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Roast Chicken favorites?

nutcakes's picture

I haven't roasted a whole chicken in ages. I used to do the Marcella recipe with a small bird. I have a 4 pound chicken that is pretty good quality. Unfortunately I didn't plan in advance so it isn't salted or seasoned. Anyone have a go to recipe? I don't have time to google around. I think the default will be lemon and herb salt like on the Finecooking web recipe, though that was supposed to be salted in advance.


I have lemon, onions, fresh oregano, garlic, apricots, prunes, potatoes, carrots, cream, white wine, vermouth, canned chix broth, various vinegars butter, olive oil, spices, not sure what else.


 


Edited 1/1/2009 7:59 pm ET by nutcakes

soupereasy's picture

(post #36910, reply #29 of 58)

Deboning a chix breast is a very quick process, and then you have the bones to make a quick bit of stock.


Just remember sharp knife!:)

suz's picture

(post #36910, reply #35 of 58)

I know I'm coming in a bit late to this conversation but perhaps for two you could consider using poussins.  That's what I've always used for chicken under a brick.  I have the butcher take out the backbone and 2 poussins(1 each) will fit in a 12" pan.  I use tin foiled covered bricks 1 on ea. poussin and cook about 12 min. per side.  They never need to go in the oven and they are as crisp as can be.

FL.Cook's picture

(post #36910, reply #37 of 58)

Thanks, but the closest I would be able to come to Poussins here would be two 2 small cornish hens , which would really be a bit**h to bone!!  I think I might go with a fryer and let the butcher do the work.  In the meantime I have five chicken thighs that I am going to roast for dinner tonight!!!  No fuss!

Carole
Gretchen's picture

(post #36910, reply #38 of 58)

There is absolutely nothing to this! You cut along both sides of the backbone--quite closely. I have done it with kitchen shears. This week I did it with a chef's knife. Then I made a little cut in the breastbone on the inside and flattened the chicken--or I have just taken it in my hands and pushed IN on the outside of the breast bone and OUT on the sides. Or put the chicken sans back bone flat on the cutting board and push HARD on the breast. It WILL flatten!!  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
Adele's picture

(post #36910, reply #39 of 58)

That's what I do too.


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

FL.Cook's picture

(post #36910, reply #41 of 58)

OK!  Next week!!!

Carole
Glenys's picture

(post #36910, reply #42 of 58)

I teach my students to check the widest part of the tail, if available or buy one that does for practice, cutting directly up on either side using the tail's wide point as the guide. The bones are usually thinnest at that idicator point, and it's no work to cut straight up parallel to the backbone, whether scissors or knife. Just a natural point of reference at no cost.

Rae's picture

(post #36910, reply #49 of 58)

What pan should I use to roast a chicken. I have a 4 lb chicken that is looking lost in my roasting pan. What I don't know is do I want it on a sheet pan that is open on the sides or a dutch oven with high sides?


Edited 1/10/2009 3:40 pm by Rae

Gretchen's picture

(post #36910, reply #50 of 58)

Low sided "cake" pan.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Rae's picture

(post #36910, reply #51 of 58)

Thanks,

Risottogirl's picture

(post #36910, reply #52 of 58)

I often roast chickens in a copper skillet. I start my chickens on top of the stove, browning each side, then into the oven in the same pan.  I can do two chickens in the larger pan :)


I like to do it in something that is heavy enought to deglaze on the stovetop. Works with a heavy stainless skillet, like AllClad, too :)



Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay


Edited 1/10/2009 5:31 pm ET by Risottogirl

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #36910, reply #53 of 58)

I spatchcock it and use a 12 inch cast iron skillet

Rae's picture

(post #36910, reply #54 of 58)

That's a great idea. My cast iron skillet is not that big but it may still work.

Gretchen's picture

(post #36910, reply #55 of 58)

If you haven't, look at Glenys's recipe for chicken with figs and honey. It is spatchcocked and fits perfectly in my 12" SS pan. AND it is just SO delicious!!


Gretchen
Gretchen
Rae's picture

(post #36910, reply #56 of 58)

That really looks good I sure like the new "email this message" feature. I can email a post to myself without having cut and paste a recipe. I think it's a new feature, I don't remember seeing it before.

Lee's picture

(post #36910, reply #57 of 58)

I frequently use a heavy quarter sheet pan.  It's the perfect size for a 3.5 to 4 pound spatchcocked chicken and allows for maximum air circulation.   

soupereasy's picture

(post #36910, reply #58 of 58)

My favourite pan as well. I always parchment.  Deglaze with the parchment, works like a charm for me.

Lee's picture

(post #36910, reply #44 of 58)

Poussins are great for this, but they are almost never available except by special order, so I use small (about 1 lb. each) Cornish game hens.  I marinate them overnight in olive oil/lemon/garlic/herbs and cook them the same way you do.  They're delicious!

suz's picture

(post #36910, reply #45 of 58)

I'm fortunate as poussins are readily available.  I marinate them for several hours in olive oil, garlic and rosemary.  Cornish Hens are a great sub.  I love cooking under a brick!

Lee's picture

(post #36910, reply #46 of 58)

Well, all this talk about roast chicken had me craving it, so I've got a butterflied chicken in the oven right now.  I used salt/espelette pepper/lemon zest/rosemary/garlic/oo under the skin and have parsnips, onion wedges, potatoes, Brussels sprouts and butternut squash roasting in the second oven at a lower temp.  I'll deglaze the pan with a splash of vermouth and add jus that I had left over from the last roast chicken.  Sure smells good!   

Glenys's picture

(post #36910, reply #47 of 58)

When I do chicken this way, I brine it when possible, but otherwise all the same ingredients then serve it over greens, drizzled with more lemon and oil, then deglaze the pan and pour that over the greens as well. It's the best.

Lee's picture

(post #36910, reply #48 of 58)

Roast chicken and greens are a great pairing.  We had a salad of mixed bitter greens with garlic and lemon vinaigrette along with the chicken and veggies.  Too much food, as DH commented, but the salad is a given as far as I'm concerned.  Sometimes I do as you do and serve it over watercress or arugula and add some of the drippings to the vinaigrette.  It's my favorite way to eat roast chicken, or steak, for that matter.


I bought a couple of organic chickens at Findley Market in Cincinnati when we were there Thanksgiving weekend.  They are raised by an Amish family that comes to the Market on weekends from Indiana.  It was amazingly juicy and very flavorful, better than the commercial Amish chickens I normally buy.  Next time we visit DD I'm going to stop at the Market and buy more of them.  One forgets how chicken is supposed to taste.


I bought a rabbit from the same purveyor and plan on cooking it Sunday.  I can't decide if I want to braise it in white wine and just serve it jointed, or turn it into a pasta sauce for fresh pappardelle.  


 

Bronwynsmom's picture

(post #36910, reply #31 of 58)

A panini press! What a great idea! Now would somebody please send me about ten more running feet of counter space?

Marie Louise's picture

(post #36910, reply #32 of 58)

I would if I could, I don't have 10 feet total in my house, let alone 10 to spare. ;-)

But here's a link to the pan I have. It lives in a cabinet, and makes great bacon.

http://www.amazon.com/Mario-Batali-Panini-Grill-Chianti/dp/B000MPR1ZU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1231128060&sr=8-1

Bronwynsmom's picture

(post #36910, reply #33 of 58)

Thank you! I may break my not-another-thing-into-this-kitchen rule for that.

Bronwynsmom's picture

(post #36910, reply #34 of 58)

Oh...forgot to ask you...do you use any additional weight for the chicken, or is the lid enough?

Marie Louise's picture

(post #36910, reply #40 of 58)

No, the lid is heavy enough.

PS this pan makes the best bacon.

evelyn's picture

(post #36910, reply #36 of 58)

2 recipes for you to try this year...

http://www.recipezaar.com/Greek-Lemon-Chicken-With-Potatoes-59469

http://www.recipezaar.com/Evs-Roast-Chicken-59580

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