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Roast Chicken favorites?

nutcakes's picture

I haven't roasted a whole chicken in ages. I used to do the Marcella recipe with a small bird. I have a 4 pound chicken that is pretty good quality. Unfortunately I didn't plan in advance so it isn't salted or seasoned. Anyone have a go to recipe? I don't have time to google around. I think the default will be lemon and herb salt like on the Finecooking web recipe, though that was supposed to be salted in advance.


I have lemon, onions, fresh oregano, garlic, apricots, prunes, potatoes, carrots, cream, white wine, vermouth, canned chix broth, various vinegars butter, olive oil, spices, not sure what else.


 


Edited 1/1/2009 7:59 pm ET by nutcakes

Syrah's picture

(post #36910, reply #1 of 58)

Anything and everything works really. I'd stuff a lemon in the cavity, along with some oregano and garlic. You could even stuff some oregano under the breast skin. with a bit of butter or even not. Season with salt and pepper inside and out.

I'd also be tempted to make a bread sauce if you have breadcrumbs. I love bread sauce with chicken.

I believe in champagne...

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Risottogirl's picture

(post #36910, reply #2 of 58)

I don't like bread sauce at all :) Must be a cultural thing. I was all excited to try it and then I thought it was kind of gross. of course maybe I had awful bread sauce, I think I'd try it again :)

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Syrah's picture

(post #36910, reply #5 of 58)

Really?? That's interesting. I think it's homey and comforting, and real cold weather food. Did you make or have it out somewhere?

I use a Jamie Oliver recipe, which is very similar to the one in my Commonsense Cookery book. I can't seem to find it online though.

This one is reasonably similar http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database/traditionalbreadsauc_8298.shtml

I believe in champagne...

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Risottogirl's picture

(post #36910, reply #7 of 58)

I had it at a dinner at a friend's house. I think she was trying to do some "British" dishes to honor a homesick friend. So it may not have been a successful version LOL.


Bread sauce is not common here at all and I know it is very traditional from reading British food mags and cookbooks.


It was pretty gross, but I would definitely try it again. I never judge anything on one try.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

ashleyd's picture

(post #36910, reply #15 of 58)

Bread sauce is not as common as it used to be (along with many other traditional British dishes, but that's another story), but it can be quite pleasing, and in the days of less well stocked pantries it could be made with what was to hand. It isn't a great taste sensation and to my mind it serves the same purpose as grits or polenta, as a foil to the meat rather than an enhancer.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Bronwynsmom's picture

(post #36910, reply #16 of 58)

One of my favorite roast (sort of) chickens is Joseph Verde's chicken under a brick from a back issue of this magazine...not a last minute decision (although you can shorten the marinating time), but it cooks fairly fast and is unfailingly delicious. Here's the link:
http://www.taunton.com/finecooking/recipes/chicken_under_brick.aspx

nutcakes's picture

(post #36910, reply #20 of 58)

That sounds like a good one. I've never done that method at home, but have had wonderful renditions in restaurants.

soupereasy's picture

(post #36910, reply #17 of 58)

Same type of consistency?

ashleyd's picture

(post #36910, reply #19 of 58)

Pretty much, the sauce is, as you would expect, a little looser.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

LMH62's picture

(post #36910, reply #43 of 58)

Hi!


Here's how I roast whole chickens. The result is crispy and juicy. In fact, the only problem I have with the recipe is the mess from all the juices when I carve it.


I just rub a little softened butter on the outside, season the bird inside and out, tie the legs and tuck the wings under and put it on a rack in a pan at 425 degrees. After 15 minutes, drop the temp to 350, throw a couple of veggies in the bottom of the pan and let it go. Total roasting time is usually about 45 minutes plus 7 minutes per pound. The drippings make a great gravy.


Good Luck!


soupereasy's picture

(post #36910, reply #3 of 58)

What's a bread sauce.  Haven't heard of it before.

teebee's picture

(post #36910, reply #4 of 58)

Thank you for asking this so that I didn't have to.

Syrah's picture

(post #36910, reply #6 of 58)

It's a British sauce traditionally served with roasted poultry. Basically, you infuse milk with onions, cloves, bayleaves and then add bread crumbs to make the sauce. It's real comfort food.

I believe in champagne...

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

nutcakes's picture

(post #36910, reply #8 of 58)

Yes, you are right, I guess everything works. Silly me not to search the forum before asking, There are so many good recipes and tips. There is a nice Ina Garten recipe that I kinda modeled it on, but I also made the Finecooking Rosemary-Lemon salt.


I think I will start getting back into the chicken roasting habit again, and try some interesting variations. Mean Chef posted a Mario Battali one. Long ago I recall making a Jacques Pepin one with butter and red wine vinegar, that was very appetizing. If anyone has anything like that I'll take it. I've always wanted to do the Zuni chicken with that TDF bread salad.


 


 

Syrah's picture

(post #36910, reply #9 of 58)

I didn't mean to sound like you shouldn't ask, just that I don't think you could roast a chicken and have it turn out badly. Even just salt and pepper makes for awesome roasted chicken.

I believe in champagne...

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Chicklette's picture

(post #36910, reply #10 of 58)

During the last hour of roasting I would toss in a a few whole heads of unpeeled garlic. These are wonderful alongside :)

JillElise's picture

(post #36910, reply #11 of 58)

Your chicken is surely long since roasted and eaten.

In any case, I like butter and herbs under the skin. It's easy and good. I also like to do a herbed soft cheese under the skin.

I'm not crazy about lemons inside chicken. The bitterness bothers me. I do sometimes peel and use the flesh of the lemons, and a bit of the zest, but not the whole thing. I do the same with oranges. It's funny, because I like bitter herbs and salads, and love orange marmelade for it's gentle bitterness.

nutcakes's picture

(post #36910, reply #12 of 58)

Funny that you say, cause my mother said she was not crazy about the seasoning, which was lemon peel, salt, dried rosemary and thyme, butter rub, with lemon and garlic inside (it was fine to my taste.) I thought the high heat I used might have made the herbs and lemon zest too bitter. But she is sensitive to acidic things. However, she did think the moist inside with the crisp skin was great. I roasted it for an hour at 425, then half hour at 400, used the thermometer to check not to overcook. Sat it on a bed of onion, potato and carrot. Made a light gravy with the drippings and some extra chicken broth.


I have always loved the Marcella Hazan chicken with two lemons, where the lemon is inside and the chicken is small and turned during roasting. It was always perfumed and wonderful and never bitter, to my taste.


And Syrah, of couse, I didn't think you meant 'don't ask', I was just overthinking things which I tend to do if I don't have an idea of something I want in particular. I really meant that a search turned up some great ideas quickly. Better than google.


Edited 1/2/2009 3:30 am ET by nutcakes

Syrah's picture

(post #36910, reply #13 of 58)

I understand. I tend to overthink things and get frustrated when I have no idea where to start. It's those nights we have eggs or buy pizza usually.

My best way to deal with when I'm not sure what to do is to go simple. Simon has never complained when we have a grilled protein and roasted vegetables for dinner. Salt and pepper as the only seasoning is pretty good. As long as something is defrosted, it's okay.

I believe in champagne...

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Gretchen's picture

(post #36910, reply #14 of 58)

My default recipe is to salt and pepper it liberally and put it in a 425* oven for an hour. Just delicious as is.  I sometimes put it on a bed of onions, add some carrot  chunks and new potatoes around the edges. Ina's recipe putting 2 lemons cut in wedges and 6 cloves of garlic in the cavity is good.

Gretchen

Gretchen
soupereasy's picture

(post #36910, reply #18 of 58)

I had been stuffing chix with garlic, herbs and lemons long before I had heard of Ina. Long before there was a Food Network. ;)


My new favourite way to roast a chix is to spatchcock it. Prior to that it had been my collochico (sp?).

wonka's picture

(post #36910, reply #25 of 58)

I do the same as you.

madnoodle's picture

(post #36910, reply #21 of 58)

I prick a whole lemon all over with a skewer and stuff it into the cavity, along with a few peeled cloves of garlic and a couple of sprigs of rosemary.  Rub coarse salt all over the outside.  That's it.  Simple and delicious, and tomorrow night's dinner.  I can't wait.  Roast chicken is my favourite.


 


I believe in compost.


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

MadMom's picture

(post #36910, reply #22 of 58)

Sounds like my recipe, which I think I got from Sally Schneider, who probably got it from someone else.  Makes delicious roast chicken.  I think she starts it breast side down for 20 minutes or so, then turns it over.  Wonderful!



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madnoodle's picture

(post #36910, reply #23 of 58)

I got the method from Bonnie Stern.  I have Sally Schnieder's book; I should compare them.  I start breast-side down too, and flip.


I believe in compost.


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Bronwynsmom's picture

(post #36910, reply #24 of 58)

About "under a brick" - yes, it's lovely. I used to keep bricks around for it, but I'm space-challenged in my current kitchen, so now I use my medium-sized Le Creuset Dutch oven with the littler one nested in and a piece of foil underneath, which weighs more than enough to smash the little birdie down.

Marie Louise's picture

(post #36910, reply #26 of 58)

I use my Mario Batali panini press. It works perfectly.

FL.Cook's picture

(post #36910, reply #27 of 58)

  I was also thinking of using my panini press. The deboning of the chicken seems like a lot of work, since there are only two of us, do you think that I could use chicken pieces instead?

Carole
Marie Louise's picture

(post #36910, reply #28 of 58)

I don't debone it, I just have the butcher take out the backbone & kind of flatten it. If I remember, I ask them to take out the keel bone. Otherwise, I do a sort of "bad CPR" on it and break a few of the ribs. [Sorry, tasteless insider joke-anyone who done CPR will appreciate it.]

FL.Cook's picture

(post #36910, reply #30 of 58)

Sounds like that's the way to go.  I better make friends with the butcher!!!

Carole