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Glenys's picture

I've been having fun reading a batch of old cookbooks, especially those with personal contributions from many home cooks. For some reason the meat dishes are absolutely frightening; don't know what people were thinking. Odd names like Michigan Salad and Lovely Salad. One was called Winter Salad, which was just coleslaw with twelve onions and 3 pints of vinegar in the dressing. Then I came across "Souffle Coleslaw Salad" so I made it last night. It was a savoury lemong mousse (mayonnaise replacing cream) with vinegar and sugar, so tangy. Green onions and cabbage shredded superfine. It was delicious.
The presentation was individual moulds turned out. I think I might make it and serve it with lobster claw meat.

Jean's picture

(post #32697, reply #1 of 52)

Oh, my, was it made with Jello?




My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Glenys's picture

(post #32697, reply #2 of 52)

No, lemon juice and gelatine.

Jean's picture

(post #32697, reply #3 of 52)

That's a relief. :)



My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Wolvie's picture

(post #32697, reply #7 of 52)

LOL - it can be - here is the jello version:(one of many)


COLESLAW SOUFFLE SALAD
 


1 (3 oz.) pkg. lemon Jello
1 c. hot water
1/2 c. mayonnaise
1/2 c. cold water
2 tbsp. vinegar
1/4 tsp. salt
1 1/2 c. cabbage, finely shredded
1/2 c. radish slices
1/2 c. celery, diced
2 to 4 tbsp. green pepper, diced
1 tbsp. onion, diced


Dissolve Jello in hot water, blend in mayonnaise, cold water, vinegar and salt. Chill until partly set. Beat until fluffy. Add cabbage, radish, celery, green pepper and onion. Pour into mold. Chill until set. Unmold on lettuce, garnish with radish slices. Serves 6 to 8.


Seriously tho, the recipe is interesting, and basically making homemade jello is a great idea - you can control the ingredients.


Edited to add: I go thru some old cookbooks from time to time, which is fun, to see what they used to come up with - especially the books focused on parties and entertaining at home. I mean, those folks were pleased back then. :-)



Sit down before fact as a little child, be prepared to give up every preconceived notion, follow humbly wherever and to whatever abysses nature leads, or you shall learn nothing.


THOMAS HENRY HUXLEY,  September 23, 1860.


 


Edited 6/21/2006 7:20 am ET by Wolvie

 

Jean's picture

(post #32697, reply #8 of 52)

Now that sounds like a midwest version. ;)



My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
schnitzel's picture

(post #32697, reply #9 of 52)

Similar to my Aunt's recipe: 13083.18  ;·)


Wolvie's picture

(post #32697, reply #10 of 52)

thought so too - vaguely remember something similar being served lo these many years ago - at a Metro Parks bbq/get together. Ah... those summer days. ;-)

Sit down before fact as a little child, be prepared to give up every preconceived notion, follow humbly wherever and to whatever abysses nature leads, or you shall learn nothing.


THOMAS HENRY HUXLEY,  September 23, 1860.


 

 

Tess's picture

(post #32697, reply #4 of 52)

Could you post the recipe? My husband loves both lemon and cabbage.

Tess's Japanese Kitchen http://1tess.wordpress.com
Glenys's picture

(post #32697, reply #5 of 52)

Coleslaw Souffle

4 large lemons
1 cup water
1 (1/4-oz) envelope gelatin
1/2 cup sugar
2 tbsp vinegar
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 cups very finely shredded cabbage
4 scallions, white and pale green only, finely minced

Remove all peel from lemons with a vegetable peeler. Boil peel and 1 cup water until water is bright yellow, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat.

Pour 1/4 cup of the lemon water in a small bowl and sprinkle in the gelatine. Let stand 2 minutes to soften.

Squeeze 2/3 cup lemon juice from lemons into a glass measure, then pour through a fine-mesh sieve into a bowl and stir in sugar until dissolved. Add the lemon water and vinegar. Stir in the mayonnaise. Chill until partially set.

Beat the chilled gelatin until fluffy. Fold in the cabbage and green onion.
Chill in oiled moulds. Makes 6-8 servings.

Marcia's picture

(post #32697, reply #11 of 52)

Do you shred the cabbage in a FP? This sounds sort of like a cleaned-up version of the famous Perfection Salad, but a whole lot better.

Glenys's picture

(post #32697, reply #12 of 52)

I cut the cabbage into 1" wedges and then chiffonade with the chef knife; wanted it very fine rather than short.

Glenys's picture

(post #32697, reply #13 of 52)

It was interesting how few jello recipes appeared in the book but marshmallows were popular. One dessert was called "Fairy Pudding", baked in a bain marie, it's a combination of marshmallows, milk, eggs, coconut sugar and vanilla. And of course, that famous Ambrosia salad with marshmallows, fruit cocktail etc. Canned pineapple seemed to be a popoular ingrdient in many things.
The book I took the Coleslaw Souffle from was from 1973, so I suspect tomato aspic and a number of jello favourites had peaked and moved on long before.

Marcia's picture

(post #32697, reply #14 of 52)

Just reading the ingredients in "Fairy Pudding" made my teeth ache. The things people eat does cover a broad spectrum.


I grew up in the land of "congealed salads", but ambrosia was special and no gelatin or jello was ever involved. Simply supremes of oranges, grated fresh coconut, and a little superfine sugar. Sliced bananas could be added just before serving, and it was always served as dessert on Thanksgiving and Christmas. The stuff they call ambrosia now, is an abomination,IMHO.


In parts of the U.S., pineapple and marshmallows are very common ingredients in these so-called salads. Yes, still.

Gretchen's picture

(post #32697, reply #16 of 52)

What are they calling ambrosia?  Indeed ambrosia after T'giving or Christmas was de rigeur in DH's home.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #32697, reply #17 of 52)

There's stuff made with jello and all sorts of added things, including marshmallows that some people call ambrosia, now. It seems to have started in the last twenty years or so, which is odd.

CulinaryArtist's picture

(post #32697, reply #15 of 52)

Just deleted a recipe in Mastercook recipe swap group that called for Lemon & Lime Jello with canned apricots and pineapple!  Too many bad memories of the food of the 50's! I'm thinking they are on the rise as there's generations that have not had the pleasure!!


Some things have translated others not so much! LOL!


 


 


Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST


http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST

http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

Marcia's picture

(post #32697, reply #18 of 52)

My cousin who still lives in Georgia, told me about something called "Watergate Salad" which is made with pistachiao instant pudding and other oddities. I'd never even *heard* of pistachio pudding, instant or not.  Who thinks these things up, anyway?

Wolvie's picture

(post #32697, reply #19 of 52)

people who sell these ungodly products. ;-)


(no offense meant to the religious folks)


Sit down before fact as a little child, be prepared to give up every preconceived notion, follow humbly wherever and to whatever abysses nature leads, or you shall learn nothing.


THOMAS HENRY HUXLEY,  September 23, 1860.


 

 

Marcia's picture

(post #32697, reply #21 of 52)

Certainly not, my dear. :) 


I suppose there should be no offence to the ones who like those things, either. There are certainly some odd things that I enjoy.

Gretchen's picture

(post #32697, reply #20 of 52)

That is a pretty common deli offering.  I didn't think it was made with pistachio pudding (which is not too bad as I recall from a good while ago).  I always thought it was lime jello. It is green, needless to say.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #32697, reply #22 of 52)

You could be right about the lime jello. Who knows, maybe it has both.


It's not a common deli item in New Jersey, at least, as far as I know.

Jean's picture

(post #32697, reply #23 of 52)

 

WATERGATE SALAD

 


1 (20 oz.) can crushed pineapple and juice
1 (3 oz.) box instant pistachio pudding mix
1 (8 oz.) container Cool Whip
1 c. miniature marshmallows
1 c. chopped nuts


Fold pudding mix into crushed pineapple and add other ingredients. Refrigerate.




My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Risottogirl's picture

(post #32697, reply #24 of 52)

Oh my. I feel faint.

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Gretchen's picture

(post #32697, reply #25 of 52)

Geez, Loueeze.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Risottogirl's picture

(post #32697, reply #26 of 52)

I can handle the discussion about some of these sordid retro concoctions, but when I actually read the recipe, that's when it hits me - I retch or I faint :)


Remember, I have almost NO sweet tooth at all.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Glenys's picture

(post #32697, reply #35 of 52)

You'll notice Oh Delicate One, that I was very good about not digressing too much into the sordid details of the horrors I did find. I'm certainly old enough to have been exposed to many versions of the real thing, especially jello salads, which both my grandfathers' loved. We get foie gras, they got jello.

Heather's picture

(post #32697, reply #38 of 52)

>>>I can handle the discussion about some of these sordid retro concoctions, but when I actually read the recipe, that's when it hits me - I retch or I faint :)<<<

I don't even have to read the recipe--the term "congealed salad" does me in.

deejeh's picture

(post #32697, reply #39 of 52)

ITA - nothing that one is meant to eat should have the word 'congealed' anywhere in the title :)


deej

Marcia's picture

(post #32697, reply #33 of 52)

From doing some very minor research, it seems that our friends at Kraft are responisble for bringing us this recipe. Pushing their pudding and CoolWhip and marshmallows.

Marcia's picture

(post #32697, reply #31 of 52)

You should feel faint. I feel like swearing, which, in fact, I did.