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red wine & lobster?

cosmo55's picture

Does anyone have recommendations for a red wine that might work with lobster? We're boiling up lobster for dinner, but, since it's our anniversary, I wanted to serve a special wine....And, for us, that would be red...Any suggestions? If not, what type of white would work best? Thanks for your advice!

Gretchen's picture

(post #36428, reply #1 of 32)

A pinot noir would be good, I think.

Gretchen

Gretchen
cosmo55's picture

(post #36428, reply #6 of 32)

And, the one red I don't think we have....so, no go on a zin, cab, meritage, syrah or merlot?

Jean's picture

(post #36428, reply #2 of 32)

Oh dear, my gut reaction is - don't do it. If you don't like the usual chardonnay, at least go with a nice rosè.



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Regality's picture

(post #36428, reply #3 of 32)

Oh dear, my gut reaction is - don't do it. If you don't like the usual chardonnay, at least go with a nice rosè


I agree wholeguttedly.  Rose' is the reddest I would recommend.  An oaky, buttery Chardonnay.  However, my #1 preference would be champagne... for personal romantic reasons.


 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


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Gretchen's picture

(post #36428, reply #4 of 32)

No, it really is pretty good Jean--if it is the right one--not a big fruit bomb ,etc. But it also has to be a good pinot, which are not easy to find, in spite of Sideways!!  DS wouldn't drink white wine if he had to!  says it tastes "white"!!  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
cosmo55's picture

(post #36428, reply #8 of 32)

I spoke too soon...I found a pinot noir....It was in one of my last wine shipments....Of course, I have no idea if it's "fruity" one or not....I'll go to the website and read the description...

Gretchen's picture

(post #36428, reply #9 of 32)

If it is a "good" pinot, it will be fine. I am constantly on the lookout for one that is "acceptable' and doesn't cost $25.  And at our wine store last weekend, I tasted their upper end pinot, and it was AWFUL!!


Jean, tonight on Iron Chef the ingredient was halibut, and both chefs did a Barolo (no shrinking violet of a wine there) sauce. Ted Allen said he wanted to eat it on icecream!!  Redwine and fish is very good. Honest.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Glenys's picture

(post #36428, reply #10 of 32)

But my dear, lobster is not fish and it also depends on the method of cooking. Grilling pulls in a red wine efficiently, especially with meaty fish.

I wouldn't recommend Pinot Noir because it's not a butter-loving wine; my first choice would be a lightly chilled Beaujolais but really, it would be a rosé Champagne or bubbly.

cosmo55's picture

(post #36428, reply #5 of 32)

Actually,  I don't think I even have any chardonnay in the house....We just came back from Sonoma, but our tastes in white tend away from the chards....Although we did order a few, they haven't yet arrived....We do have sauvignon blanc, pinot gris, pinot blanc, cuayhoga and guevertz....Any "second choices" from any of those?

Regality's picture

(post #36428, reply #7 of 32)

The pb, pg, or sb would all be fine.

 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


http://regality3.livejournal.com/



Risottogirl's picture

(post #36428, reply #20 of 32)

I would serve a dry sauvignon blanc or rose, or a sparkling rose with plain boiled lobster.


Of course, I am not really a chardonnay fan, at least not those from CA.


I do know my lobster, though :)



Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay


Edited 9/24/2008 12:03 pm ET by Risottogirl

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

cosmo55's picture

(post #36428, reply #22 of 32)

I went with a chenin blanc and a sauvignon blanc...I thought they both worked well....I agree re: the oaky CA chards, but every so often, I have a CA chard that I think is phenomenal....We had a 2006 Chard from Paradise Ridge that I thought was great, the Hawkes Vineyard chard was also wonderful, as was the Homewood one that I had last year (but not the one this year!)..but, again, for me, it's the exception not the rule to enjoy the CA chards....

BonnieinHolland's picture

(post #36428, reply #11 of 32)

It depends on how the lobster is cooked and the sauces, accompaniments.  But I can't think of any red that would work with lobster, really.  Certainly not a California red, not even a pinot noir.  Perhaps a pinot noir from the Sancerre area of the Loire Valley (France) as those tend to be able go with fish reasonably well.  As Glenys noted, you might be able to get away with a Beaujolais, but even that is iffy.  (For Beaujolais, avoid B Nouveau -- needs to be Beaujolais-Villages or a light cru Beaujolais, like Fleurie, Chiroubles, or St. Amour.)  The idea of a rose Champagne is best if the wine has to have color.  Best of all would be a white Burgundy from France (which are of the Chardonnay grape but tend to lack that overt butterscotch-vanilla thing of California Chardonnay so they go very well with shelled fish).  cheers, Bonnie

gmunger's picture

(post #36428, reply #17 of 32)

Best of all would be a white Burgundy from France (which are of the Chardonnay grape but tend to lack that overt butterscotch-vanilla thing of California Chardonnay so they go very well with shelled fish).


Hi Bonnie


I'm not a big fan of CA butterbombs either, but it is quite possible to find a delicious old-world style Chardonnay from the States. While the pendulum is swinging back to more balance in the CA Chard culture, as a general rule I've found much better luck with Washington Chardonnay. Better acidity, better value too. I was recently bowled over by a Chardonnay from Abeja in Walla Walla. Incredible depth, but balanced. It easily met my simple criteria for excellence: power AND grace, dancing in tandem. Ditto for their Syrah.


 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
BonnieinHolland's picture

(post #36428, reply #19 of 32)

Point well taken!  I sure wish that we had more to choose from here.  American wines that you mostly find here tend to be on the lower quality end with extremely high prices so I shy away from them -- the Chardonnay's are in the hugely American-oaked vein.  Thus, I haven't tried my share of good-quality American wines, alas.  Only the rare few.  cheers, Bonnie

thecooktoo's picture

(post #36428, reply #12 of 32)

Ya got all that information now.  All have some really good advice about what wines would go with the lobster.


My advice is really simple.  Go with what you like.  Red, white or rose;  still or sparkling, whatever you like will make it a special evening.


If I were preparing dinner for you, or preparing it in my own home I would use either a Viognier from Condrieu in the Northern Rhone Valley or a white Crozes Hermitage from the same area (it's rousanne and marsanne)....because I don't like CA chards.  Or I would select a red or rose sparkler.


edited to add:  The sparklers would probably come from Australia if I were selecting them.


Do let us know what you decide to go with...would really like to know what you chose and how it worked out with the lobster.


Jim


Edited 9/21/2008 5:32 pm ET by thecooktoo

cosmo55's picture

(post #36428, reply #13 of 32)

Okay....after everyone's advice re: the reds, we ended up going with a sauvignon blanc (which was opened the previous day) and a chenin blanc....I thought they both went well with the lobster...So, thanks for the help....We saved the nice reds for another day!

Syrah's picture

(post #36428, reply #14 of 32)

Good move.

Red wine does go well with Salmon in my opinion. Particularly when the flavours are strong.

I tend to have more special whites than reds. I guess for me, living in the other hemisphere, most of my celebrating is done in the warmer months so it seems to make sense.

I believe in champagne...

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

cosmo55's picture

(post #36428, reply #15 of 32)

Interesting...I enjoy whites, but our "special" wines are typically red...I tend to be something of a seasonal wine selector...white in summer and red in the fall/winter....

Syrah's picture

(post #36428, reply #16 of 32)

Me too.. and all our BIG parties tend to be in summer.

I believe in champagne...

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

cosmo55's picture

(post #36428, reply #18 of 32)

You are much kinder than I....when I have a party, I tend to serve the less expensive wines...when it's a really special wine, I regret even having to share it with my husband!!!

trio33's picture

(post #36428, reply #21 of 32)

Born and raised on the Maine coast. Lobster is a delicate flavor if boiled, better steamed. Any strong wine, red or white may overpower the lobster. If you are willing, do a baked stuffed lobster. A Cabernet is excellent.

cosmo55's picture

(post #36428, reply #23 of 32)

I've never made steamed lobster...is it a much slower cooking process? I have a hard enough time lowering them into boiling water....I'd hate to here them scrambling any longer than that....

Risottogirl's picture

(post #36428, reply #25 of 32)

When we say boiled (at least among my family and friends) we really do mean steamed since there is only a few inches of boiling water in the pot).

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Marcia's picture

(post #36428, reply #26 of 32)

Speaking of lobster, there's a question I've been meaning to ask you. I know you like the soft shelled lobsters and we much prefer them. The meat seems so much sweeter, and extra liquid aside, they are much easier to eat. That would not be a factor if I didn't enjoy them so much, however.

I've heard people denigrate them terribly and it puzzles me. Is there a stigma attached to the soft shells, or have I run into the wrong people?

Gretchen's picture

(post #36428, reply #27 of 32)

When we went to Maine a couple of years ago I asked my Maine friend about them and she said that was all you wanted to have.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #36428, reply #28 of 32)

Well, I surely agree with your friend - there's really no comparison, IMO, and my family agrees. I wouldn't mind a few to cook tonight, but I'd rather do it on the Maine coast. :)

We always like to cook extra for lobster salad or lobster rolls -- talk about heaven.

Gretchen's picture

(post #36428, reply #29 of 32)

I am NO expert. That was my first trip to Maine and I want to go back for lots of reasons. So, I asked.  We had some good dishes.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Risottogirl's picture

(post #36428, reply #30 of 32)

I don't know...perhaps more $$ equals better to some people? Maybe I was raised by frugal Yankees, but I like my "shedders".


I dated a guy in SF once who (apparently) really wanted to impress me, so he specially ordered a FIVE POUND lobster for a dinner date at a posh, old guard type restaurant (name escapes me, it was almost 20 years ago). I was speechless and horrified as I tried to CHEW my way through the monstrosity. It was like eating elastics. And I doubt it was the cooking.


I would never willingly eat a lobster bigger than 1.5 lbs.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

kathymcmo's picture

(post #36428, reply #31 of 32)

So I guess that size does matter.