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Recipes or Thoughts on Tea..

Risottogirl's picture

...based rubs for salmon (or even for meat or poultry)?


I am really thinking green tea, but not ruling out black altogether. I have gathered some stuff from googling, books etc., but haven't hit what I am looking for yet. Of course, being able to articulate what I am looking for MIGHT help !


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Glenys's picture

(post #32679, reply #1 of 10)

A friend infuses Earl Grey in oil and uses it for a salmon thing. Can't remember. I use Lagsang Souchong for wok smoking salmon or poached chicken breasts for salad. I'm not much help.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #32679, reply #2 of 10)

I have done tea smoking with Lapsang Souchong (sp?) and poaching and of course desserts with EG infusions.


I have in mind a rub using matcha, I think, but the idea is not fully formed.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

drussell's picture

(post #32679, reply #3 of 10)

Ming Tsai has two tea rubs in his "Simply Ming" book that might interest you. 


CITRUS HERBAL TEA RUB


1 cup green tea leaves
1/2 cup dried peppermint, spearmint, or mint
1 cup lemongrass powder or flakes
2 tablespoons sea salt or kosher salt
2 tablespoons turbinado sugar or raw sugar
1/2 cup dried orange zest, crushed
1/2 cup dried lime zest
1/4 cup dried lemon zest
1/4 cup ground ginger


Combine all the ingredients in a small bowl. Use or store.
Makes about 4 cups. Lasts 3 weeks, refrigerated.


 


FIVE-SPICE CHILE TEA RUB


3 cups lapsang souchong tea leaves
1/2 cup sea salt or kosher salt
1/2 cup red pepper flakes
1/2 cup chipotle chile powder
1/2 cup dehydrated garlic or regular garlic powder (not garlic salt)
1/4 cup cayenne pepper
1/4 cup dried chives or onions
1/4 cup five-spice powder


Combine all ingredients in a medium bowl. Use or store.
Makes about 6 cups. Lasts 3 weeks, refrigerated.


 


 

Risottogirl's picture

(post #32679, reply #4 of 10)

Thanks! The second one pops up all over but I have not seen the first one. Looks interesting!

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Wolvie's picture

(post #32679, reply #7 of 10)

I don't know if you've seen this one from Ming, but - it's pretty good with fish. here is the link with some recipes: http://www.ming.com/simplyming/showrecipesSeason2/CurryTeaRub.htm


 


CURRY TEA




  • 11⁄4 cups Madras curry or any local curry powder



  • 1⁄2 cup turbinado sugar



  • 1⁄2 cup blackberry tea or any local fruity tea



  • 2 tablespoons ground ginger



  • 1⁄2 cup sea salt



  • 1⁄4 cup chives



  • 1⁄4 cup lime zest


In a small bowl, mix all the ingredients together. Store in a covered glass jar in a dry, dark place for up to 1 month.


 


I have always loved tea smoking— a classic Chinese cooking technique for the wonderful smoky flavor it imparts on food. Here I’ve combined a fruity blackberry tea with curry powder. Fruit and curry is always a great combination, especially in the Indian tradition —think of all those wonderful chutneys! While I was in South Africa, I toured the famous spice markets of Durban, which are filled with aromatic and colorful Indian spices—South Africa has an enormous Indian influence. While many home cooks steer clear of Indian cuisine, this Curry Tea Rub gives you the wonderful flavor of India with minimum fuss or expense. Just rub the curry spice blend on chicken, fish, meat or veggies and then cook—in no time you have a unique and tasty dish and it doesn’t get much easier than that!


Sit down before fact as a little child, be prepared to give up every preconceived notion, follow humbly wherever and to whatever abysses nature leads, or you shall learn nothing.


THOMAS HENRY HUXLEY,  September 23, 1860.


 

 

chiquiNO's picture

(post #32679, reply #8 of 10)

Are there no instructions on ho0w to use this in the recipes???  Rub it on and smoke?? Pan sear?? Bake??

Chiqui from way down yonder in New Orleans

 

drussell's picture

(post #32679, reply #9 of 10)

Those 2 rubs are presented as master recipes in Ming Tsai's book, "Simply Ming." He gives a few ideas on how to use the rubs and goes on to present recipes that feature the rubs.
For the Five-Spice Chile Rub he suggests using the rub as you would any other: to season chicken, salmon, hamburger,turkey, and more. Sprinkle the rub on vegetables before grilling them. Use the rub to season meatloaf. Sprinkle the rub over the loaf before baking.
Here's one of the recipes for the Five-Spice Chile Rub:


TEA-RUBBED SALMON WITH STEAMED SCALLION-LEMON RICE


serves 4


1 cup Five-Spice Chile Tea Rub
4 center-cut skinless salmon fillets, 5 to 6 ounces each
2 Tbs. grapeseed or canola oil
2 cups jasmine rice, washed
juice and zest of 2 lemons
1/4 thinly sliced scallions, white and green parts
pinch of salt


1. Spread the rub on a large plate and coat the salmon in it liberally.


2. Heat a large saute pan over high heat. Add the oil and swirl to coat the pan. Add the salmon and saute, turning once, until the salmon is cooked, 3 to 4 minutes per side for medium.


3. Meanwhile, cook the rice in a rice cooker, adding the lemon juice, half the zest, the scallions, and the salt to the water. Alternatively, place the rice in a medium saucepan fitted with a tight lid. Flatten the rice with a palm and without removing your hand, add water until it touches the middle and highest knuckle of your hand. Add the lemon juice, half the zest, the scallions, and the salt, cover, and bring the water to a boil over high heat, 10 to 15 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer for 30 minutes. Turn off the heat and let the rice stand, covered, to plump, for 20 minutes.


4. Place a small mound of rice (there will be rice left over) and top with salmon. Garnish with remaining zest and serve.


The two other recipes for this rub are: Tea-rubbed Sirloin with Country Mash and Tea-braised Lamb Stew. Let me know if you want these.


For the Citrus Herbal Tea Rub he suggests seasoning scallops and pan-frying them; seasoning chicken thighs with the rub and braising them in stock(slow cooking in liquid allows the tea to "steep" which brings out its subtle flavor); trim and halve zucchini lengthwise and coat all sides with the rub, sear in a medium hot pan until cooked through and well colored (about 5 minutes.)


Ming also suggests making your own dried zest for this rub. Zest the fruit, spread the zests on a baking sheet, bake at 200 degrees F. until the zests are dried, about 2 hours. Store in a tightly sealed container in the fridge.


Here's a recipe for the Citrus Herbal Tea Rub"


SEARED TEA-RUBBED CHICKEN BREASTS WITH CELERY SAUTE


serves4


1 cup citrus herbal tea rub
4 boneless chicken breasts with skin
3 Tbs. grapeseed or canola oil
2 shallots, minced
1 head of celery, sliced diagonally 1/4 inch thick (about 4 cups)
juice and zest of 1 lemon
1 cup Master Chicken Broth (another recipe in the book) or low sodium canned chicken stock
kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 Tbs. unsalted butter


1. Spread the rub on a large plate and dredge the chicken breasts in it on both sides.


2. Heat a large saute pan over medium heat, add 2 Tbs. of the oil, and swirl to coat the pan. Saute the breasts, turning once, until cooked through, 4 to 5 minutes per side. Set the breasts aside and reheat the pan. Add the remaining tablespoon of oil, swirl to coat the pan, and add the shallots. Allow the shallots to sweat, about 1 minute. Add the celery and saute, stirring, until just heated through, about 2 minutes. Add the lemon juice and the broth, and season with salt and pepper. Cook until reduced by one quarter, 6 to 8 minutes. Whisk in the butter.


3. Slice the breasts diagonally 1/4 inch thick. Divide the celery among 4 plates and arrange the chicken around it. Spoon the pan sauce over the chicken and serve.


The other recipes for the citrus herbal rub are: citrus tea-rubbed halibut with orange fennel orzo salad; tea-rubbed shrimp fried rice; and citrus herbal tea-steamed scallops. Let me know if you're interested in these. 

chiquiNO's picture

(post #32679, reply #10 of 10)

Thanks so much...both sound just delish..think I need his books...LOL

Chiqui from way down yonder in New Orleans

 

Rhea's picture

(post #32679, reply #5 of 10)

...someone here mentioned the two from Ming Tsai-I have used both and they are quite good.:)

 a wise woman once said you have to kiss alot of frogs before you find your prince.. my lips are sore...!

I can't even afford the lifestyle I don't want...

Syrah's picture

(post #32679, reply #6 of 10)

I posted a tea steamed fish recipe a while back. It was delicious.

"The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off"
Gloria Steinem

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie