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Potato skin broth

SallyBR1's picture

A friend of ours showed me a cooking book he's had for 30 years, he wanted to show me bread recipes he used to make and love

browsing through the book, I was surprised to see a recipe for "potato skin broth" - used as a base for soups, some quite simple

When you peel potatoes, instead of trashing the peel you make a broth with it, some onions, salt -

has anyone ever hear of it? Or actually tasted it?

 


 


The garbage disposal is your friend. Treat it nicely.


(A little pearl of wisdom, February 2009)

Gretchen's picture

(post #37191, reply #1 of 40)

It should actually be quite flavorful. I love potato skins.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Risottogirl's picture

(post #37191, reply #2 of 40)

I think I recall my grandmother doing that, I'll ask my mother. The memory I have is from I was very small - a conversation between my mother and my father's mother about what to do with them. My mother grew up on a farm and they were fed to the pigs, my grandmother said she used them for soup. I remember being horrified...either way. Pretty sure it was potato peels...

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Marcia's picture

(post #37191, reply #3 of 40)

In the early seventies, when many young people were vegetarians (not that they aren't now), I remember a vegetable broth that used potato skins. They are very flavorful and I should think they'd work well for certain applications.

I almost never peel potatoes, even for mashed potatoes. DH insisted that I try using the skins, and I've always loved them, so it works for me.

soupereasy's picture

(post #37191, reply #7 of 40)

I rarely peel either. Seems like a waste.

Flapjack66's picture

(post #37191, reply #8 of 40)

I think I remember seeing that idea in a now-long-gone book called The Vegetarian Epicure.

Also around at the time was the idea of simmering apple peelings in a little water and adding that liquid to an apple pie filling. As long as the apples are organic, I still like to do that.

Marcia's picture

(post #37191, reply #9 of 40)

Try adding a splash Calvados instead, or in addition...it's yummy.

I had that book, too, so maybe that's where I remember it from. Anna Thomas or Thompson and she used gobs of butter and cream, but from what I understand, it's considered a classic. Am pretty sure there was a Vegetarian Epicure II.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #37191, reply #10 of 40)

HA! I think that's the title of the book this friend of mine showed me

I make photocopies and gave the book back to him, but I am almost sure that was it - no photos, just black and white drawings in the beginning of each chapter

is that it?

 


 


The garbage disposal is your friend. Treat it nicely.


(A little pearl of wisdom, February 2009)

Marcia's picture

(post #37191, reply #11 of 40)

Not Flapjack, but that's the book!

SallyBR1's picture

(post #37191, reply #12 of 40)

amazing! I made photocopies of the bread recipes, and a few others I intend to try

another thing that surprised me - and if you have the book you can check it out - it how many of the recipes call for MSG

 


 


The garbage disposal is your friend. Treat it nicely.


(A little pearl of wisdom, February 2009)

roz's picture

(post #37191, reply #13 of 40)

Yep...Anna Thomas. I have all three of her books and only rarely use them for a couple of recipes...pierogi, a wonderful squash pie filling, tamales, and a few other ethnic things I can't remember.

Here is her site.

http://www.vegetarianepicure.com/

She has updated her recipes in The New Vegetarian Epicure and I don't remember MSG appearing in those.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Ozark's picture

(post #37191, reply #14 of 40)

I saw a recipe once that roasted the peels first.

 


Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

 

Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

roz's picture

(post #37191, reply #15 of 40)

If I roasted the peels first, I would just eat them! I like the potato skins/peels!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Marcia's picture

(post #37191, reply #17 of 40)

I'd eat them, too. Whenever we had baked potatoes in my youth, I'd eat my own potato skin and my father's as well; I considered myself very lucky.

roz's picture

(post #37191, reply #18 of 40)

OMG! We were siblings! I would eat my Dad's potato skins, too! I guess we would of fought over the skins!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Marcia's picture

(post #37191, reply #19 of 40)

I hope we would have shared nicely, but I doubt it. LOL

What is it with fathers and potato skins, I wonder?

Marcia's picture

(post #37191, reply #16 of 40)

I don't remember the MSG at all. That seems very odd.

I probably still have the book, but if I do it's packed in a box in the dark recesses of the basement.

Syrah's picture

(post #37191, reply #20 of 40)

Me too. Plus, all those vitamins are right under the skin. Makes it easier not to peel it away.


 


 


My perseverance will be rewarded.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Marcia's picture

(post #37191, reply #21 of 40)

When DH suggested I not peel potatoes, I was almost shocked, but heck, I already loved the skin and I became a quick convert. ;-) Who likes peeling potatoes?

I almost always buy organic potatoes, because I understand lots of pesticides are used in growing potatoes. The ones I find aren't too expensive, either, thank goodness.

Gretchen's picture

(post #37191, reply #22 of 40)

Just a thought--I don't think the pesticide would get to the potato itself, would it?  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #37191, reply #23 of 40)

Some would but not as much as in the skin. We were talking about eating the skins and that is my main concern about the pesticides.

Gretchen's picture

(post #37191, reply #24 of 40)

But how would it get there underground. I just don't see the mechanism.  Just dirt contamination from harvesting?  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #37191, reply #26 of 40)

I don't know, but I have read that potatoes are some of the worst offenders when it comes to large amounts of pesticide.

There is a list called "the dirty dozen" which is a ranking of the fruits and vegetables which are most contaminated by pesticides, and potatoes are number nine on the list.


Edited 3/10/2009 10:59 am ET by Marcia

Ozark's picture

(post #37191, reply #27 of 40)

The most efficient way to fertilize a plant is thru the leaves. Would also get on the ground and rain washing it into the soils. Many studies on this.

 


Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

 

Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

Jean's picture

(post #37191, reply #28 of 40)

So many of our potatoes seem to get that green sunburn which is toxic in large doses, and you can't always see it until you start to peel. I love potato skins too, but I try to watch them carefully.



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Ozark's picture

(post #37191, reply #29 of 40)

Really bad in the stores here that stay open 24 hours.

 


Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

 

Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

Marcia's picture

(post #37191, reply #30 of 40)

There are a couple of things I really like about the Whole Foods market about an hour from us, and one is the loose organic potatoes. The price is always what I consider reasonable, and one can pick and choose carefully.

My potato choice for most applications is Yukon Gold, and I got thoroughly sick of buying a five pound bag, and having to toss so many.
There were some green spots but what really bothered me is that some were always almost rotten; I do try to look carefully but one can only see so much through the bags, which is by design. It didn't seem to matter what time of year the potatoes were purchased, either.

Gretchen's picture

(post #37191, reply #32 of 40)

I thought the green was from refrigerating--which may happen in the warehouse?  I think it goes away after a few days at room temp.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #37191, reply #33 of 40)

No, the green is from exposure to light.

Syrah's picture

(post #37191, reply #34 of 40)

Well I hadn't ever considered that. The organic potatoes I used to be able to get were really quite good, but I'm back to ordinary now. I do give them a good scrub, I don't know how effective that would be though.

My perseverance will be rewarded.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Risottogirl's picture

(post #37191, reply #35 of 40)

I agree about potatoes. One of the items I do try to always buy organic.

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay