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Madeleine's picture

Pesto (post #33222)

I've never made pesto, but I'm bringing in all me basil before the frost and thought that was a logical thing to do with it.  Some things I read say you can freeze it.  What else can you do with it besides put it over pasta?

Madeleine

Madeleine
SallyBR1's picture

(post #33222, reply #1 of 20)

Swirl over soups....

spread a little on a toasted baguette slice, a thin slice of tomato and mozarella on top, run under the broiler

I like to add a little over pan fried fish just before serving - but I am a pesto addict, can have it with almost anything :-)

Sometimes I dilute my pesto with olive oil and use it over Caprese salad - looks gorgeous, tastes great... we also add the same "pesto dressing" to a "Caprese-variation" that includes avocado slices.

 


 


"Her shimmyshaky is much better than her chimichurri"
(Glenys, June 2006)

macy's picture

(post #33222, reply #2 of 20)

Toss it with vegetables---steamed carrots are good with pesto and parmesan to taste. Cooked zucchini too.

Gretchen's picture

(post #33222, reply #4 of 20)

Spread on your bread with some mayo on a chicken salad sandwich.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #33222, reply #3 of 20)

First of all, it's best frozen without cheese, and the cheese added when it's used. I think leaving out the cheese makes it more versatile for other uses, such as Sally's idea of adding it to sauteed fish, which I do, too.


We like a cube added to a rice pilaf, and it's lovely in some soups as someone mentioned. I've used it as an addition to a pan of steamed mussels and that's delicious, too. Just be sure not to overdo, since the pesto is a very strong flavor element and you don't want it to overwhelm something delicate.


I freeze mine in ice cube trays reserved each year for the purpose, and well wrapped, it keeps nicely. If you have a Food Saver it's all the better. We don't, and it's fine.

pamilyn's picture

(post #33222, reply #5 of 20)

Grilled asiago, pesto and shrimp sandwich. Major yum.....Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

KarenP's picture

(post #33222, reply #6 of 20)

 You could make some compound butters, as well.  They freeze well, makes great gifts, and are so welcome in January or February.

Napie's picture

(post #33222, reply #7 of 20)

Red spuds and broccoli steamed together with LOTS of pesto.  Mixed half and half with Mayo on about any sandwich.  On just about any grilled meat or fish.  Or, I have been known to eat it straight off the spoon.... 

Madeleine's picture

(post #33222, reply #8 of 20)

Thanks everyone for all the ideas.  Think I will make some without the cheese and freeze in cubes for later use. 

Madeleine

Madeleine
RuthWells's picture

(post #33222, reply #9 of 20)

I use pesto as a spread on a thin wrap, before adding roasted veggies and rolling it up.  Major yum.  Pesto is also good for a non-traditional pizza -- we had one last week which was pesto with fresh garden tomatoes sliced on top.


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

ckells's picture

(post #33222, reply #12 of 20)

I also spread it on pizza crust before adding sauces and veggies. We thin it with olive oil and dip lovely bread in, I think I'll thaw some now.

Syrah's picture

(post #33222, reply #13 of 20)

I do this too.. and it is lovely.

"god, I'd love to turn this little blue world upside down", Tori Amos

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

butterscotch's picture

(post #33222, reply #10 of 20)

You can use it as a pizza topping--just don't bake it with the pizza. Apply it to the baked pizza just before serving.


You can also make a salad dressing out of it. Dilute it with some vinegar and/or lemon juice and more oil, if necessary. Good on pasta salads.

thedessertlady's picture

(post #33222, reply #11 of 20)

Take some nice red peppers 1/2 and seed them put a tbsp or so of pesto in the bottom and top with baby Bocconcini's and a little sherry or balsamic vinegar (1/2 tsp or so) and grill on BBQ until cheese is melted or bake in oven and broil at the end.

Aberwacky's picture

(post #33222, reply #14 of 20)

Freeze some basil just chopped, too.  Very versatile.


I chop it in my food processor, then pack it into ice cube trays to freeze.  When it's frozen, I pop it out and vaccuum seal it.


Great for all kinds of applications.


Leigh


How is it that we put man on the moon before we figured out it would be a good idea to put wheels on luggage?

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Madeleine's picture

(post #33222, reply #15 of 20)

Wow...I thought basil would just blacken if it were frozen!  I don't have a vacuum sealer, can I freeze it in zip locs?

Madeleine

Madeleine
Marcia's picture

(post #33222, reply #16 of 20)

I freeze it in ziplocks, but carefully. My method is as follows: wash, stem and dry the basil thoroughly. Place in a heavy duty bag in one layer, making sure as much air as possible is out of the bag. It doesn't have to be a really thin layer, but fairly thin. Freeze. It does turn color, but most of the flavor remains. You can only use it in cooked dishes, of course, and I just break off a portion and crumble it into the hot dish. It's not perfect, but it works for me.

Aberwacky's picture

(post #33222, reply #17 of 20)

I go ahead and chop it up so I don't have to do it later, but I use lots of the frozen basil all winter.  The flavor is soooo much better than dried, and it's wonderful for all kinds of cooked dishes, as you suggest. 


I wash, stem but don't dry it (the water on the leaves helps it freeze together better, I think) then chop it up in batches in the food processor, pack it into ice cube trays, etc., and freeze.  The next day I pop the basil cubes out of the trays and into bags.  I like the size--makes it easy to add one or more to whatever I'm making.


Leigh


How is it that we put man on the moon before we figured out it would be a good idea to put wheels on luggage?

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Marcia's picture

(post #33222, reply #19 of 20)

I just might try your method, if only because it's a real PITA to dry the stuff. It IS so good during the winter, isn't it? Some say it just doesn't have the flavor, but it's far better than winter supermarket basil, and the dried is a another animal entirely.

Aberwacky's picture

(post #33222, reply #20 of 20)

I agree--it's better than winter supermarket basil (not to mention cheaper!), and in cooked dishes I don't notice a difference.  I don't keep dry on hand, because it just doesn't have the right oomph to me.


Leigh


How is it that we put man on the moon before we figured out it would be a good idea to put wheels on luggage?

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #33222, reply #18 of 20)

I picked the last of my basil yesterday and quickly blanched it and then into ice water to keep the bright green color.  I made Giada's pesto that she used for grilled tuna.  Very good with the added touch of lemon.  I just wanted to use the basil before it was totally gone, so it was a last minute thing, but I ended up serving a small bowl with some bread chunks before dinner...the pesto made it to the dinner table. 


I also freeze it without the cheese.