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gjander's picture

Oven Fries (post #30379)

Tonight I was kind of in the mood for french fries, but I didn't want to bother with the whole hot oil thing.  I frequently make oven roasted potatoes where I cut the potatoes into wedges, toss them in olive oil, salt and pepper, and then roast in the convection oven at 400 for an hour or so.  Tonight though, I cut them into sticks and just shortened the cooking time a bit.  They were as good as, if not better, than true fried potatoes.  Crisp and flavorful.  If you haven't tried this I recommend it.


Gary

madnoodle's picture

(post #30379, reply #1 of 44)

I do this all the time.  I think I like sweet potato "fries" even better than white potato fries.

Saskatchewan:  hard to spell; easy to draw.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Bethany's picture

(post #30379, reply #2 of 44)

That's the ONLY way I make French *Fries*. We eat very healthy, so frying is out of the question. I do real frying maybe twice a year.

 


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Lword's picture

(post #30379, reply #3 of 44)

These are wonderful and I like them segregated - make a rectangle of the potato to facilitate easier slicing and season the curved portions of the strips with peel differently. Also like doing this with sweet potatoes as noodle mentioned. I like rosemary on white potatoes but not sweet, and like something hot on the peeled portions. A mixture makes a nice presentation too, and you can dip them in anything.

L.

L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
chocolatedog's picture

(post #30379, reply #4 of 44)

There is a great article in Cooks Mag. issue Feb 2004 pg 20.  It recommends using Russet Potatoes and soaking them in warm water for 1/2 hr b-4 cooking them.. It alows them to absorb liquid and not dry out during the cooking.  Dry them off and bake in the bottom rack of the oven on a sheet covered with tin foil for 5 min. uncover and cook for 20 - flip and cook for 20 more.  475 degrees.  These are fullproof DTF.

 

 

ehBeth's picture

(post #30379, reply #32 of 44)

An ancient Martha Stewart magazine had a variant on this.  It recommended soaking the potato slices/wedges/sticks in a bowl of water with some fruit vinegar added it.  I don't know the food chemistry involved, but it results in a wonderful, slightly puffed, very crispy potato chip/wedge/stick.  My dad always requests these homemade chips/whatevers when I visit. 


 


If you can't play a sport, be one.
If you can't play a sport, be one.
courgette's picture

(post #30379, reply #34 of 44)

I've made ovem fries for years in an attempt to cut down on fat. We love 'em, even more than reg fries. Only problem is, we eat too many, so now I only make a few!

Heather's picture

(post #30379, reply #36 of 44)

We have oven fries often but I'd never heard the vinegar bath variant before. I just received a magazine (we are on some list that we can't get off of that sends us random magazines constantly--this one was "Chile Pepper") with a recipe for "Seared Tenderloin on a Yukon Gold Crouton with Zinfandel-Maytag Blue Drizzle". The potatoes are sliced into 1/4" thick rounds and soaked in 1/2 C Champagne vinegar, salt, mixed fresh herbs and 1/4 C olive oil then baked on parchment.

ehBeth's picture

(post #30379, reply #37 of 44)

Oh, I like the sound of those 'croutons'.

If you can't play a sport, be one.

If you can't play a sport, be one.
Wolvie's picture

(post #30379, reply #38 of 44)

me too. I'll have to try those.

Men in authority will always think that criticism of their policies is dangerous. They will always equate their policies with patriotism, and find criticism subversive.   Henry Steele Commager



 

 

Heather's picture

(post #30379, reply #39 of 44)

Would you like the actual recipe's version of "mixed fresh herbs" or are you happy winging it?

ehBeth's picture

(post #30379, reply #40 of 44)

I would love the 'real' recipe. Thank you.

If you can't play a sport, be one.
If you can't play a sport, be one.
Heather's picture

(post #30379, reply #41 of 44)

Did you want the whole recipe or just the herb mix?

ehBeth's picture

(post #30379, reply #42 of 44)

The herb mix is what I'm after. I'm working up trying new herb/spice/seasoning combos. Thanks.

If you can't play a sport, be one.

If you can't play a sport, be one.
Heather's picture

(post #30379, reply #43 of 44)

This makes a lot more than you need for the croutons--they rub the tenderloin with the rest.

4 T fresh basil
5 T fresh Italian parsley
2 T fresh oregano
1 T fresh rosemary
2 T fresh thyme
1 T fresh sage
All herbs are chopped before measuring
6 cloves garlic, minced
1 T each pink, green and black peppercorns, coarsely crushed
Pulse in the FP.

ehBeth's picture

(post #30379, reply #44 of 44)

Thanks so much, Heather.

I'm doing a lot more with Italian parsley - now that I've learned how much flavour it has (v. curly parsley, which I just never 'got'

If you can't play a sport, be one.
If you can't play a sport, be one.
madnoodle's picture

(post #30379, reply #5 of 44)

you can dip them in anything


Really?  You mean there's life beyond ketchup?  I think I've been hanging out with the kids for too long.


Saskatchewan:  hard to spell; easy to draw.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Wolvie's picture

(post #30379, reply #6 of 44)

did you use russets or yukons?


I don't normally have russets in the house, but if that's what I need, that's what I will buy.



Men in authority will always think that criticism of their policies is dangerous. They will always equate their policies with patriotism, and find criticism subversive.   Henry Steele Commager



 


Edited 1/27/2005 8:03 am ET by Wolvie

 

gjander's picture

(post #30379, reply #7 of 44)

Yukons work perfectly.  As for dipping, mayo is excellent.  I'm usually too fat conscious to do it, but I do enjoy it occasionally.

PeterDurand's picture

(post #30379, reply #8 of 44)

Try Hellmans Ultra Low Fat mayo. LoML did not believe when I said it tastes just like the "real" thing. So I administered a blind tasting and converted her.

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #30379, reply #9 of 44)

I agree about the Hellman's. I think it is that it is "tart" like real mayo is.

Gretchen

Gretchen
gjander's picture

(post #30379, reply #10 of 44)

I'm interested--but what's it made of?  Am I replacing the fat with something not fat but even worse?  My general philosophy is to avoid fat free and sugar free products and just keep things in moderation.  But I'm on the lookout for a new mayo anyway.  We recently bought a jar of canola oil mayo at Whole Foods that is just terrible.

Wolvie's picture

(post #30379, reply #11 of 44)

jar of canola oil mayo at Whole Foods that is just terrible.


and this surprised you? ;-0


Seriously, I think moderation is the key. I do homemade mostly, just as much as I need.


Men in authority will always think that criticism of their policies is dangerous. They will always equate their policies with patriotism, and find criticism subversive.   Henry Steele Commager



 

 

assibams's picture

(post #30379, reply #28 of 44)

ITA! Unless I have to make cole slaw for a large gathering (school things) I avoid commercial mayo like the plague. Homemade is easy and fast enough to make. And if you want to cut back on fat there are many more possibilities than a dollop of mayo. If you have a stick blender you can make a mock mayo with a whole egg, foolproof and less oil and fat.

"...never forget that the first syllable of convenience is con."
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Herm Albright

JoanneB17's picture

(post #30379, reply #33 of 44)

ITA, although I do buy the Hellman's light.


I found when testing immersion blenders that you can actually freeze homemade mayo--although I'm guessing you can use up a batch pretty quickly. But if you do need to freeze it, it works. I'd put each batch in a ziplock bag, flatten it and bundle and put in a freezer bag. When I was making just a batch of sandwiches, I took out a single bag, let it defrost for a few minutes (or squish it with hands to hasten)--it looks terrible and curdled, but just immersion blend it a few seconds and it's back to normal.

Marcia's picture

(post #30379, reply #35 of 44)

I love it - homemade mayonnaise can actually be frozen? I would never have guessed. Such a happy accident came from your testing of immersion blenders.


I have a 15 year old Moulinex which is still going strong, and I adore it. It even has a ricer attachment which I've not seen elsewhere else. Did you happen to run into a ricer in any of your tests, as I've not seen them anywhere else?


I believe Moulinex was bought out by Braun some years back, and my Moulinex must have cost all of twenty dollars.


BYT, if you have access to a Trader Joe's their mayonnaise is great - no sugar and no preservatives, as well as a good price. I've tried Whole Food's brand and it's just plain nasty.

Gretchen's picture

(post #30379, reply #13 of 44)

If the canola oil mayo is full fat, what have you gained?  The "truth in packaging" is usually violated by their labelling it "cholesterol free", which all or nearly all mayo is anyway.
 Personally I have never had any of the "organic" type  mayos that tasted nearly as good as the old standards.

Gretchen

Gretchen
GeezeLouise's picture

(post #30379, reply #14 of 44)

What kind of oil is used in "regular" mayo, like Hellman's or Kraft? I always thought mayo was an emulsion of egg and oil. I guess I assumed it would be canola - maybe safflower oil? I wonder why the canola oil mayo would be gross. My DH really likes Nayonaise, made from tofu.


I am new by the way, well I have lurked for a long, long, long time so I feel like I know a lot of you. And no, I am not a Zaar refugee :)


 

Gretchen's picture

(post #30379, reply #16 of 44)

Welcome.


You are right about the oil and egg emulsion plus some acid, etc.  It could be canola oil, vegetable oil, corn, safflower, olive oil, etc.  There are just some mayos that don't taste good for whatever reason--their recipe, I guess.


Gretchen
Gretchen
MadMom's picture

(post #30379, reply #19 of 44)

Hi, and welcome to CT.  I happen to like just about anything Hellman's makes, including the low fat and fat free mayo.



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GeezeLouise's picture

(post #30379, reply #21 of 44)

Thanks! Nice to be here!


There have been some <interesting> discussions around here lately!


I like regular Hellman's myself, on the rare occasion that I do eat mayonaise. I have never made it myself, mainly because I don't like it all that much. It doesn't sound too difficult though!