NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Oregon Pinot Gris

gmunger's picture

Maybe I have mentioned it in previous posts, but....I love it. One of the more underappreciated groups of wines these days.


Pinot gris is now grown in many parts of the world. It sometimes goes by its Italian name, Pinot Grigio. Many US wineries have adopted this moniker, presumably for marketing reasons. In northern Italy, PG makes a pleasant, if often uninteresting quaff, with notable exceptions of course. In Alsace, PG is made into dry, sometimes assertive wines often with heady floral aromas and a distinctive earthy (minerally) character.


In Oregon, PG seems to have found yet another home. I have tasted perhaps a half-dozen different producers and have liked every one. The wines seem to tend toward being more fruit-driven than their Alsatian counterparts. But they retain the tart backbone that provides structure and makes them so food-friendly. Love OR PG with salmon, or most any dish that calls for a rich, dry white.


I recently tried the Adelsheim 1996 Willamette Valley with FC's Mediterranean chicken salad with fennel, raisins, and pine nuts. I liked the wine perfectly fine on its own, but with the chicken salad it really blossomed. This was one of the happier food/wine pairings I've had in a while. Give it a try and tell me what you think.



 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.


Edited 6/6/2008 11:37 am by gmunger

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
BonnieinHolland's picture

(post #36021, reply #1 of 55)

Defintitely count me in as another Pinot Gris fan!  Right now, my favorite is by Ehrhart, Domaine St. Remy, from Alsace.  They farm biodynamically, and the wine is wonderful.  Plus good value at 10.45 euros per bottle.  Especially good paired with smoked salmon.  cheers, Bonnie


Edited 6/6/2008 10:30 pm ET by BonnieinHolland

Amy's picture

(post #36021, reply #2 of 55)

Ok, you sold me. We are going to picnic w/ concert on Sunday. That's what I'll take. And will report back.

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #36021, reply #3 of 55)

I'm a huge Pinot Gris fan. I love the BC pinot gris, but I've never tried any form Oregon. I'll keep a look out for it.

gmunger's picture

(post #36021, reply #5 of 55)

I'm disappointed we see no BC wines here in MT. You are only over the hill from us! And I've heard good things.

 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
CookiM0nster's picture

(post #36021, reply #11 of 55)

How close are you to the border? I could always arrange to meet you for lunch and a wine trade.

Heather's picture

(post #36021, reply #4 of 55)

I did crostini with that chicken salad last summer and people loved it.

gmunger's picture

(post #36021, reply #6 of 55)

It's definitely a winner. I made a lemon/garlic/olive oil orzo too. Used baby romaine leaves as wraps/scoops for both.

 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
thecooktoo's picture

(post #36021, reply #8 of 55)

ITA = pinot gris is wonderful food wine.  For  your information I have attached a menu sheet for a class I taught a year or so ago featuring Washington and Oregon wines.  As  you can see, these are both cooking classes and wine tastings...and it was a real toss up whether to serve the Pinot Noir with the Salmon or the chicken...chicken won.  But actually in practice, I served the Pinot Noir last and carried it over to the chicken.  I just can't not serve Pinot Noir with good Northwest Salmon.


Only had a chance to serve one Pinot Gris, but it was a good one.  Also did a Pinot Class a coupel of years ago, Noir,Gris, Blanc and Meunier


MENU


Wine Pairing


Pacific Coast Wines


Washington and Oregon


October 12, 2007


7:00 PM – 10:00 PM


Ross Boddy Community Center


Montgomery County Recreation Department


 


Jim Davis, Instructor


Member, Society of Wine Educators


 


Domaine Ste. Michelle, Blanc de Noirs, White Sparkling Wine


with Amuse Bouche


Pork Tenderloin with Roasted Vegetables and Apples


Gewurtztraminer, Washington Hills, 2006, Columbia Valley, Washington


Riesling, Columbia Crest, 2006, Columbia Valley, Washington


Chenin Blanc, Hogue, 2005, Columbia Valley, Washington


 

...[Message truncated]


Edited 6/6/2008 2:32 pm ET by thecooktoo

cosmo55's picture

(post #36021, reply #7 of 55)

Thanks for the "heads up". I really enjoy pinot gris, but I have not yet tried any from Oregon. I'm looking forward to doing so...I would highly recommend a pinot gris from mendocino county -- handley cellars pinot gris -- it's really quite good!

gmunger's picture

(post #36021, reply #12 of 55)

They make a nice gewurztraminer too?

 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
cosmo55's picture

(post #36021, reply #13 of 55)

I think they do that as well...I'm not as fond of guvertz, but I do tend to like theirs...they also just came out with something called Water Tower White -- a viognier and riesling blend -- that I thought would be too sweet, but turned out to be quite enjoyable! I'm a big fan of their wines!

gmunger's picture

(post #36021, reply #15 of 55)

Thanks for the tip. I don't do the buying at the store. I'm just a newbie. But I do get to give lots of input.

 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
Marcia's picture

(post #36021, reply #16 of 55)

Last Friday's Wall Street Journal had an article on Pinot Gris (possibly it was Saturday), but sad to say I didn't pay much attention and it's been recycled.

Amy's picture

(post #36021, reply #40 of 55)

I have the article. If you want it, I could scan [I think!] and email to you.

Marcia's picture

(post #36021, reply #45 of 55)

Thank you, but I thought the article might be interesting for some of the others posting about Pinot Gris.

Glenys's picture

(post #36021, reply #9 of 55)

Someday we hope you'll get a chance to try the Mt Boucherie Pinot Gris from BC. The distinctive colour, which is hard to describe, say a bit of an aged Sauternes tint, and a fine balance between fruit and flint. I love it, although the previous release was superb, this one is excellent. You should do a road trip and we'll meet for a fest in the Okanagan.

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #36021, reply #10 of 55)

I haven't had that one. Got to find out if they'll ship to Alberta.

gmunger's picture

(post #36021, reply #14 of 55)

A road trip would be great, a fest even greater. But I have no time for travel these days. DW and I have discussed a trip to the Vancouver area, and if it looks like it might come to fruition we'll surely arrange a shake-n-howdy over eats and drinks.


I haven't even visited any of our own Northwest wine country, alas. Turns out DW is not a wine drinker, so while she would make a perfect designated driver it would hardly be as much fun for her. Perhaps I could trade her for a brewery tour day when I chauffeur?


 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
KarenP's picture

(post #36021, reply #17 of 55)

  I'm in the same fan club.  I've had a good one from Oregon that I believe was called Kings County (06).  Another I like that is more local is from J Vineyards in Sonoma.  I also like Robert Sinsky's Abraxas, a blend that includes some pinot gris.

gmunger's picture

(post #36021, reply #19 of 55)

King Estate?

 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
KarenP's picture

(post #36021, reply #20 of 55)

 Yes, King Estate.  Always best to look and not guess at the end of the day. 

gmunger's picture

(post #36021, reply #21 of 55)

One thing I've been surprised with at this new retail wine job is the # of customers who come in looking for a specific wine, but are trying to simply "recognize" a label. They know not the varietal or geographic origin, let alone producer. Hard to help them.


One guy, though had a unique solution. He photographed wine labels for wines he found particularly compelling, using his camera phone at home. Then, when he came into the store, he had an image of the label handy to show me.


 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
roz's picture

(post #36021, reply #22 of 55)

"One guy, though had a unique solution. He photographed wine labels for wines he found particularly compelling, using his camera phone at home. Then, when he came into the store, he had an image of the label handy to show me."

Great idea! If your store did not carry that particular 'label', could you recommend something similar or, to your taste, better?

We had a lovely pinot grigio Veneto, 2006 L'Elfo Sacchetto last night. A beautiful straw colored wine, just enough lip-smackin' taste for me. And it was 10Euro.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
gmunger's picture

(post #36021, reply #23 of 55)

If your store did not carry that particular 'label', could you recommend something similar or, to your taste, better?


Almost always, yes. But you would be surprised at the number of people who are only interested in one particular wine, and are not interested in hearing about alternatives. Never mind that an alternative might even turn out to be better.


All that said, I am fortunate where I am. We have a disproportionate (compared with average retail outlets) number of customers who are engaged. Lots and lots of good folks. Makes the job much more enjoyable.


 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
roz's picture

(post #36021, reply #24 of 55)

I met your counterpart at the Hanover Food Co-op last year! He was very knowledgeable and patient when I was looking for a sparkling/champagne wine for my girls for their reunion. Of course, I didn't get to taste what he recommended but the reports were favorable.

Mostly here in Ireland we rely on our memories, not too good, to buy wine. The "Dunnes Store Girl' is very sullen!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
KarenP's picture

(post #36021, reply #25 of 55)

They know not the varietal or geographic origin, let alone producer. Hard to help them.


  I know you can tell by how intelligently I can converse on the subject but I don't drink much or often.  When I do, I hope for something of a quality that helps make the moment be it a meal or just hanging out.  I am exactly the person who should write things down or have pictures and I rarely do.  What makes me different than those you're talking about is that I would prefer to try a recommendation of someone who has some knowledge based on a description of what I've liked before or what would pair with what I'm having.  The times I ask for an exact match is when I've really enjoyed something and want someone else to have a chance to try it.  I tried this when I was in Minnesota, they had neither of the two things I was looking for. 

Gretchen's picture

(post #36021, reply #26 of 55)

It is what absolutely amazes me about our daughter's knowledge of wine. She just came back from a 4 day wine tasting trip to Napa with Kendall Jackson. She had a terrific time, plus SO many wine tastings.


SHE can remember, know, put together with food, and all. It is lots of fun when we get together to shop and taste wines.


And at the restaurant, along the lines of what is being said, many will come in and just order the biggest baddest most expensive cab, whether or not it goes with the meal or not!! "maybe I can suggest something for you?"


Gretchen
Gretchen
KarenP's picture

(post #36021, reply #27 of 55)

It is what absolutely amazes me about our daughter's knowledge of wine. She just came back from a 4 day wine tasting trip to Napa with Kendall Jackson. She had a terrific time, plus SO many wine tastings.


  I have the utmost respect for people with that talent.  To know vintages, good years, grapes, wine makers, and events that changed the harvest over the amount of territory that she must know is phenomenal.  Those credentials are not easy to earn.  I volunteer over at Copia and spent time helping with Peter Marks classes when he was with them.  He is one of not very many masters of wine.  I pick up little pearls, but don't use it enough to retain it.  Now Andrea is there.  The first wine weekend was rescheduled to August and I'm scheduled to help with that one...I know it will be fascinating.
  I hope those people are wise enough to take some advice when offered. 


Edited 6/7/2008 11:20 pm by KarenP

BonnieinHolland's picture

(post #36021, reply #28 of 55)

Karen, I have been curious as to why Peter Marks left.  Does it have anything with the new regime there at COPIA?  And any idea what he is doing now?  cheers, Bonnie

KarenP's picture

(post #36021, reply #29 of 55)

  He went to a winery and if I remember correctly, it's Regusci.  Burke went to Bonniedoon.  Jacqueline went to Laura Chanel.  It is too coincidental to not have something to do with the new regime but noone has said that.  The staff that are there seem enthusiastic.  Gary has some great plans and many have already come to fruition.  There is a new bistro in that big cavernous lobby. It is more welcoming when you walk in the door.  There is talk of a tv show that would be shot in the Meyer Food Forum (already equiped) and on site with growers of food and wine that would hopefully be televised.  Regardless, there will be web programming this year.  Those horrible wine machines are going away.  There will be a new wine bar with 500 vintners represented.  A new welcome area.  To come a full culinary insitute and full wine institute upstairs.  Thats just off the top of my head.  One of my friends saw Tyler Florence there on Friday.  They seem committed to get back to what Julia Child and Robert Mondavi had mind for the place.