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Now, let's talk Thanksgiving!!!

chiquiNO's picture

Anybody trying anything new this year???  I'm always reluctant to change too many things on my traditional menu because there is always an uproar if I leave something off that someone was looking forward to!!


This year I will be in Raleigh, actually I leave Monday for Raleigh for the birth of my 5th grandbaby!!!  I will be cooking Thanksgiving dinner and although the guest list will only be about 5-6 people, I will try to keep as traditional as possible.


I am taking oyster dressing already made and frozen.  I will also take some smoked sausage to make the turkey gumbo.  My biggest change this year will be to try the dry brine method described here and in Martha's Thanksgiving issue!!  Martha also has a cake that looks divine...Butterscotch/Pecan something layer cake!!


One question????  DO you rinse it off the turkey before roasting???  Seems like a LOT of salt to leave it all on the bird!  I will also try to make some of Giada's Chocolate Dipped Nougat!!  Looked so good and so easy!


 


Anybody else trying something new???


 

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #36620, reply #1 of 111)

You rinse it off if you put it on the day before as that method says.

Gretchen

Gretchen
chiquiNO's picture

(post #36620, reply #2 of 111)

AH!!  Of course, Martha's directions say to rinse it out, too!!  Don't know why I didn't catch that...guess I had one eye on the recipe and the other on the returns!!LOL

 

 

BossHog's picture

(post #36620, reply #3 of 111)

Just a bit of input regarding something you said. ..

My Grandma used to make what she danged well pleased for meals. She then told us if we didn't like it we could starve for all she cared.

I don't endorse a stance quite THAT harsh. But if YOU are the one buying the food, preparing it, and having me over to your house to eat it I dang well ain't gonna complain if you don't make one or two thing thats I like.

So go with what you WANT to make. If they don't like it, they can contribute to the meal next year.

Q: What's a turkey's favorite song?
A: "White Christmas"



Gretchen's picture

(post #36620, reply #4 of 111)

Nah, I think you misunderstand the feminine psyche when it comes to family meals.   ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
BossHog's picture

(post #36620, reply #5 of 111)

"I think you misunderstand the feminine psyche when it comes to family meals."

I think I understand it. (As much as a man EVER understands how women think)

I don't mean to tell anyone what to do. I'm only suggesting that the OP worry a little more about what THEY want to do, and not try to make everyone happy. (An impossible task)

I feel honored when someone goes to a lot of trouble to make a meal for me. I would never complain about what someone did or did not make.

O.K. - I wouldn't complain MUCH. But I do occasionally like to poke fun.

a few years back my Mom made some "brown 'n serve" rolls for dinner. But she left them in a bit too long, and they got burned a bit. So I referred to them as "black 'n serve" rolls.

She didn't see the humor in that for some reason.

(-:

I plead contemporary insanity.



Jillsifer's picture

(post #36620, reply #7 of 111)

I feel honored when someone goes to a lot of trouble to make a meal for me. I would never complain about what someone did or did not make.


JEEEEEZ, I wish more people felt that way, and (dare I hope?) passed it along to their children.


It's gotten so bad here that one friend actually jokes when he's invited to dinner--"What are you serving? I need to see what's on the menu at so-and-so's house that night before I accept or decline the invitation.


Regarding Thanksgiving innovations at my house--nope. My 13-year-old traditionalist would hand me my head if I changed ANYTHING. We're having the usual suspects--turkey, dressing, chiffonade of Brussels sprouts (probably in bacon drippings--I'll indulge!), sweet potatoes, mashed potatoes, pumpkin pie, apple pie and a whole lotta "Pilgrim casserole" for leftovers.



 


 


Motherhood: It's STILL not for sissies.


Edited 11/5/2008 1:40 pm by Jillsifer

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

BossHog's picture

(post #36620, reply #8 of 111)

If I invited someone over for dinner and they said "What are you making?" I'd probably smack 'em upside the head.

.

I can't say this over at BT or they'd take away my man card, but -

Have you ever read the book "The Five Love Languages"?

"Acts of service" is my primary love language. Someone making a meal for me falls into that category. That's probably why I appreciate it so much.

.

Apologies to the OP for hijacking the thread...

Sometimes it's better to put love into hugs than into words.



Jillsifer's picture

(post #36620, reply #9 of 111)

If I invited someone over for dinner and they said "What are you making?" I'd probably smack 'em upside the head.


Well, so would I if it were serious. This friend is a prankster of the first water, and ADORES yanking my chain (and the chains of others).


Yes, I'm pretty sure I read that book a million years ago. I think I even have its offspring--The Five Love Languages for Teens or something like that. Should prob'ly get around to reading that one!


 


 


Yes, I know who I'm voting for. No, I won't tell you.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

evelyn's picture

(post #36620, reply #17 of 111)

what is pilgrim casserole?

In the end, that's what this election is about. Do we participate in a politics of cynicism or a politics of hope? Barack Obama

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
Jillsifer's picture

(post #36620, reply #18 of 111)

Finely minced Pilgrim mixed with turkey feathers, bits of ground Plymouth Rock and a few shards of Mayflower wood, of course! ;-)


(I'm playing.) When G was very tiny, "Pilgrim casserole" came into being as a way to deal with Thanksgiving leftovers. It's really just ANYTHING left from Thanksgiving dinner layered in an enormous ceramic casserole, then drowned in gravy. It feeds us for the rest of Thanksgiving weekend, during the preliminary Christmas baking, decoration finding, list making and shopping that we swear we're not going to do. "Pilgrim casserole" is just a smarty-pants name for "leftovers all piled into one dish."


Typically, it's sliced turkey, mashed potatoes, roasted broccoli and MOUNTAINS of dressing/stuffing arranged in layers, with each layer being slightly drenched in leftover gravy. I cover it in foil on Thanksgiving night and everyone is free to grab and reheat as they like.


It is NOT diet friendly. But it's easy and convenient and eliminates the problem of having nine million containers fighting for space in an already-crammed refrigerator.


(G and my mom top their reheated Pilgrim casserole with cranberry sauce but they're Visigoths and I think the sweet-savory combination tastes vile.)


 


 


 


Motherhood: It's STILL not for sissies.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

evelyn's picture

(post #36620, reply #20 of 111)

sounds 'interesting'.LOL I think I'd use a little cranberry sauce myself.

In the end, that's what this election is about. Do we participate in a politics of cynicism or a politics of hope? Barack Obama

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
annieqst's picture

(post #36620, reply #73 of 111)

Jillsifer: What do you do to your brussels? A chiffonade sounds like a fast cook and that might be a switch that would be good to make.

Jillsifer's picture

(post #36620, reply #74 of 111)

It's from Diane Morgan's The Thanksgiving Table. I believe it's called (cleverly) chiffonade of Brussels sprouts with hazelnuts and bacon, and I'm at work, so don't have the recipe with me. But I can post it if you like.


And it IS yummy!


 


 


Motherhood: It's STILL not for sissies.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

Jean's picture

(post #36620, reply #75 of 111)

I think that is in T&T. Yup.  http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cookstalk/messages?msg=13909.1



A merry heart does good like a medicine: Prov. 22:17



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TracyK's picture

(post #36620, reply #76 of 111)

It's in T&T: http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cookstalk/messages?msg=13909.1


:-)


For the record, I add a splash of balsamic or cider vinegar at the end, and use pecans instead of hazelnuts. I prefer it that way!



"The thing I love about Senator Obama is that he is, deep down, a doer of homework. All I want is a chief executive who has done/will do the reading!"                              -- Sarah Vowell

annieqst's picture

(post #36620, reply #77 of 111)

Thanks Jillsifer, Tracy & Jean!

soupereasy's picture

(post #36620, reply #80 of 111)

There is also an FC version which I have made my own with lemon zest and ( I use pistachio nutmeats).

Eisje's picture

(post #36620, reply #6 of 111)

I like your grandma. Wonderful life philosophy and the perfect cure for all the neurotic pleasing behaviour I am so often guilty of.

Carole4's picture

(post #36620, reply #10 of 111)

Your dinner sounds wonderful, as usual. We are having about 15 people this year and we are doing the turkey, stuffing, gravy and my port cranberry sauce. Everyone is bringing a side so there will be lots of vegetables as most of them are vegetarians and always come up with some good an unusual dishes.

Husband is going to make the chocolate/pomegranate torte in this issue. That's going to be new for us along with the usual pies.

Jillsifer's picture

(post #36620, reply #11 of 111)

my port cranberry sauce


Ooooooooooh, yum. Is that a sharable recipe? (Share-able?)


Not sure what's wrong with my brain this morning . . .


 


 


Yes, I know who I'm voting for. No, I won't tell you.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

Carole4's picture

(post #36620, reply #13 of 111)

Sure is. I've made it every year now for about 15 years.

Here tis: Came from Gourmet

12 ounce bag of cranberries
1 cup sugar or to taste
1 cup Tawny Port
1 t. freshly grated lemon zest
2 T. fresh lemon juice
1 1/2 t. grated Nutmeg

In a large saucepan combine the cranberries, sugar, port, zest, lemon juice and nutmeg. Simmer for about 15/20 minutes or until mixture has thickened and let it cool. Spoon the mixture into a 1 quart decorative mold and chill, covered. Run a thin knife around the edge of the mold , dip the mold into warm water for about 10 seconds and invert it onto a serving plate. Serves 8

I usually double it as we love the leftovers!

Enjoy

Jillsifer's picture

(post #36620, reply #19 of 111)

Thank you! I'm doing a "dress rehearsal" Thanksgiving dinner this weekend with a formerly cooking-impaired friend, and I think we'll have this! Can't wait to try it.


Thanks,


j


 


 


 


Motherhood: It's STILL not for sissies.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

MadMom's picture

(post #36620, reply #22 of 111)

My family are traditionalists, as well.  There are certain things we MUST have on Thanksgiving, but the remainder is optional.  I used to try a different recipe for cranberry relish every year, but DH and family always asked for the canned stuff (preferably the jellied canned stuff, sliced with the ridges still showing from the can.)  Since I was the only one who ever ate it, I finally gave up.  Nobody eats it anyway, but we still have to have it.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Jillsifer's picture

(post #36620, reply #24 of 111)

Having tradition-minded kids gets my wholehearted approval. SOOOOOO much heritage has been/can be/will be lost because people don't stop to think about preserving things of value from the past. Certainly not everything; a family must flex and adjust and adapt over time. But when I hear about families who toss out the ENTIRE past unthinkingly it makes me sad and scared.


Christmas Eve is much more flexible in our house--Gillen doesn't seem to have big issues with my changing anything except his grandmother's bag of potato chips and enormous bowl of "California Dip," (circa . . . what, 1964?).


 


 


Motherhood: It's STILL not for sissies.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

MadMom's picture

(post #36620, reply #27 of 111)

Sounds delicious.  Christmas Eve at our house always includes "G-Ma's Chili" which is made with ground beef, tomatoes, and all the things no Texan would ever put in their chili.  Still, it's a tradition, and will probably be served this year, as always.  I usually serve turkey and dressing, gravy, rolls, G-Ma's stuffed carrots, canned le Seur peas, mashed potatoes, and, if my DSIL comes up from Louisiana, some sweet potatoes (probably topped with marshmallows, so shoot me!).  There will be at least a French silk pie for dessert, heaven only knows what else.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

FL.Cook's picture

(post #36620, reply #81 of 111)

Thanksgiving at our house would never be without the sweet potatoes and marshmallows!!!  I still have to make the green beans with the mushroom soup!!  Tradition, tradition, tradition!!!!  But at least I can make my cranberry sauce!!  Actually, this year is at my daughter in laws parents home, and she is the worst cook!!  So, my son will cook, I will cook and hopefully she won't!  Everything in her house is no fat!!

Carole
MadMom's picture

(post #36620, reply #82 of 111)

One Thanksgiving, DH and I were in Tucson, didn't know a soul, couldn't find any place open, even McDonald's was closed.  We finally ended up at Denny's.  One of the worst Thanksgiving meals I've ever had, but then, on this day, everyone wants to eat exactly what their grandmother used to fix.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

SallyBR1's picture

(post #36620, reply #83 of 111)

Glad to talk Thanksgiving, although this post could very well be entitled:

ME AND MY BIG MOUTH

(sigh)

I just need some sympathy

we are having all three boys + 2 girlfriends for Thanksgiving - it will be the first time the house will be full for almost a full week. That in itself will be a challenge, but no big deal

our neighbor wanted to join both families for a post-thanksgiving party on Saturday - a cocktail party of sorts.

however, because one of the sons leaves on Saturday afternoon, we suggested it on Friday eve...

my neighbor said that it would be pretty hard to have the party over there because her thanksgiving meal is labor intensive, she has no help from anyone, cooks every single dish herself

I heard myself saying loud and clear: NO PROBLEM! We make it in our house instead....

I was not fully aware at the time, but she is bringing 16 people. We are 7. That makes a cocktail party for 23

On the day after Thanksgiving.

Why do I put myself in this kind of situation is beyond my understanding.

Carole4's picture

(post #36620, reply #84 of 111)

Because you're like me, you speak before you think of the consequences...<G>

No, I seriously think it's because you're too nice and people know this. Tell her you changed your mind.

MadMom's picture

(post #36620, reply #85 of 111)

That's ridiculous.  If she is bringing over twice the number of people, then she should provide over 2/3 of the refreshments.  I can understand her house being a wreck, but seriously, she has gall. 



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!