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New (to me) taste sensation

Gretchen's picture

Just when I thought I had roasted every vegetable I possibly could, it is  now roasted kale. It is delicious.


Cut the stems out, toss with olive oil, sprinkle with salt. Roast @425* (I have seen every temp from 250*-450*) for about 10 minutes. Turn with tongs and roast another 10 minutes. It will still be dark green with just a touch of brown, and crispy.


Thanks to Cyn for the idea. Who'd a thunk it!!


Gretchen


Edited 2/28/2009 2:15 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
roz's picture

(post #37160, reply #1 of 76)

That does sound delish, Gretchen. But boo-hoo, all my kale is gone from the garden. I'll book mark the recipe. Thanks.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Gretchen's picture

(post #37160, reply #2 of 76)

It is 99c/lb.--that is a lot of kale!! But it is really different.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Nightrider's picture

(post #37160, reply #3 of 76)

I do this too. It's delicious! I love the crispy brown edges :)

kathymcmo's picture

(post #37160, reply #4 of 76)

I did this by mistake a few weeks ago. I had braised some kale earlier in the week, and left it in the oven too long when reheating the leftovers. It was delicious with the crunchy edges! A happy accident. Now I will try to do it on purpose.

Gretchen's picture

(post #37160, reply #6 of 76)

You will be even more amazed. It is like a green "potato" chip. VERY crisp, dry and tasty.

Gretchen

Gretchen
kathymcmo's picture

(post #37160, reply #7 of 76)

Really wishing I'd picked up some kale at the farmers market this morning! Next week.

Marcia's picture

(post #37160, reply #8 of 76)

It's irksome that I so often forget about this method of cooking kale. Maybe your posts will remind me. ;-)

Heather's picture

(post #37160, reply #9 of 76)

A friend puts lots of seasonings on kale and dries it in her food dehydrator. A very tasty snack.

Gretchen's picture

(post #37160, reply #10 of 76)

BUT no need for the dehydrator. And I can only wonder about the size of the dehydrator!! But no never mind. This is going to be a staple--DH's answer to NO POTATO CHIPS!!  LOL

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #37160, reply #11 of 76)

Potato chips, if they're good ones, are better than kale, I'm sad to say. (: 'Course that is just one woman's opinion, and you don't have to tell your DH.

Gretchen's picture

(post #37160, reply #12 of 76)

OH, you will get NO objection to that here in this family. BUT they are a gone commodity from DH's cholesterol diet.  Mikey likes the kale chips!!


We have not had potato chips in this house for 16 months--as opposed to --well, I will not EVEN embarrass DH with that statistic.  LOL  He's proud to be a recovering potato chip addict (apologies to true AA, etc. folks).


Gretchen


Edited 2/28/2009 8:49 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #37160, reply #19 of 76)

I understand, but I've not begun recovering as yet although I don't often buy potato chips because if I do, I eat them. DH hasn't much interest in them, which boggles my mind.

Heather's picture

(post #37160, reply #13 of 76)

So yours gets really crispy in the oven--that's great to know because I wasn't going to buy a dehydrator.

Gretchen's picture

(post #37160, reply #17 of 76)

It does. And I left it in the turned off oven to get the last leaves crisp.


The original recipe I saw said 250* for 40 minutes, but in looking I saw temps all over the place, most being the higher so decided there wasn't much to lose. I did oversalt to my taste, not DH's, because I did it at the beginning when there was so much surface.


And as I said, new to me--finding lots of things that I hadn't before.  ;o)  Lucky me!!


Gretchen
Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #37160, reply #5 of 76)

Molly Katzen suggested roasting kale in some place or other. Glad you found it, because it's really good.

Lee's picture

(post #37160, reply #14 of 76)

It's delicious, but it's not new.  I use Jacques Pepin's method, which is to toss the kale with a little olive oil, put it on a rack over a baking sheet, sprinkle with coarse salt and roast it at 250F (no higher) for 20 to 25 minutes (no more).  It works with chard and spinach, too, but it's best with kale. 

avak123's picture

(post #37160, reply #15 of 76)

I remember a few years back when FC recommended freezing kale prior to cooking. Having cooked kale in a variety of ways, I decided to try this around Thanksgiving.

Silly me...even with a spare frig/freezer in the garage, bagged kale for twelve, takes up a LOT of space. Not a great idea to try around Turkey day. Frankly, I could not tell a bit of difference by using this method.

Live and learn!

leonap's picture

(post #37160, reply #16 of 76)

I can't believe you washed enough kale for 12 people at Thanksgiving. lol.

Now, to the opposite end of roasting kale, how about massaging your kale? I kid you not. Apparently massaging greens is pretty common with raw food enthusiasts. http://cheaphealthygood.blogspot.com/search/label/Recipes%3A%20Vegetarian Scroll down to the 2/25 post, but if you need to increase your fiber, check out the recipe for the Indonesian Curried Bean Stew while you're there.

Lastly, there is a blog called I Heart Kale. http://iheartkale.blogspot.com/


Edited 3/1/2009 7:38 am ET by leonap

avak123's picture

(post #37160, reply #20 of 76)

Massaging my kale, that's one I haven't tried! :-)

I love bean stews. Thanks for the heads up.

roz's picture

(post #37160, reply #21 of 76)

Paula Wolfert has a recipe for 'massaged' greens in one of her cookbooks. I've tried it and it works! A little salt certainly breaks down the cell walls of the plant.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
leonap's picture

(post #37160, reply #29 of 76)

I'll have to give it a try sometime.

Lee's picture

(post #37160, reply #18 of 76)

LOL, that's a LOT of kale!

wonka's picture

(post #37160, reply #22 of 76)

I make this all the time as my snack. Love it.

Maedl's picture

(post #37160, reply #23 of 76)

I read your note before I headed off to the farmers' market this morning, so I brought a bag stuffed full of kale home for experimentation. I followed your time and temperature and it came out crisp all the way through--tasted great, crunched even better, but is that the way yours came out?

I must say that dinner was particularly good--what with a divine crabcake, the kale, roasted mini-peppers and grape tomatoes, a small piece of roasted sweet potato, and a salad of avocado, orange, olives, and red onions. And some wine too--an Aglianico, which I discovered is an ancient grape that is grown in Basilicata and Campagnia. It was brought to Italy by the Greeks, and the Greeks most likely got it from the Phoenicians. Perhaps it was not the perfect bottle for the crabcakes, but it was open and beckoning from the refrigerator!

So now, I am inside and feeling quite cozy. The snow has begun (the storm is coming from the South and those are the ones that usually result in tons of snow. Even if we're snowed in, I have a very well-stocked refrigerator and am secure in the knowledge that it will melt in a few days and spring will be just around the corner.

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Gretchen's picture

(post #37160, reply #24 of 76)

We are having this magical southern US snowfall--DH just about has his nose pressed against the window watching it.


And yes, thin and crunchy!! It is so good!! All these folks coming on and saying they love it should have been sharing all this time!! BUT   NOW we have it!!


Gretchen
Gretchen
Maedl's picture

(post #37160, reply #25 of 76)

I'm wondering how it might work with mustard greens. I have some in the refrigerator, which I may try for tomorrow's dinner.

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Gretchen's picture

(post #37160, reply #26 of 76)

I just hope you have a LOT. It should be excellent/wonderful. I am just blown away by this leafy green treatment. I just had NO idea it could be SO good!


  Forgive my sophomoricness, those who knew.  Don't hide the light under the bushel!!  It is so good!!


Gretchen
Gretchen
designercook's picture

(post #37160, reply #40 of 76)

When my partner and I discovered roasted kale we loved it but wondered if the nutrients were crisped right out of the kale. Anyone have any knowledge around that topic?

Thanks,

Gordon

TracyK's picture

(post #37160, reply #41 of 76)

Generally the less water contact a vegetable has during the cooking process, the more nutrients remain... which is why steaming is "better" than boiling, microwaving "better" than steaming. So by that measure roasting would be superior.


Then again, it's not like you can eat kale raw (except maybe the tiniest young tender leaves), so I don't think it;s too much of a concern.



"I really do not know that anything has ever been more exciting than diagramming sentences."
                                                            --Gertrude Stein

Adele's picture

(post #37160, reply #43 of 76)

I'll never forget the time I was so very proud of myself for eating (and liking) a spinach salad....only to be told that because I didn't cook it it had no nutritional value.


Obviously it still bothers me.  LOL


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!