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SallyBR1's picture

I've done roasted cauliflower soup, tomato soup, carrot soup, accorn squash soup

Need ideas - I would like to have a different kind of soup for next week. Maybe better to avoid creamy soups, unless it's something totally tantalizing (tantalizing, don t you love this word?)

Merci, in advance for your ideas

By the way, Jean - the accorn squash soup was great! I made a pretty big batch, we had it three times during this past week, every time it seemed to get better. Yesterday we finished it up - I had a little bit of baby green peas leftover from a previous dinner, and decided to sprinkle them over the soup. It was pretty interesting. Looked cute and tasted surprisingly good.

 


 


"Born ok the first time...."

Geoffchef's picture

(post #32198, reply #1 of 51)

Go directly to Mean Chef Recipes.

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

schnitzel's picture

(post #32198, reply #2 of 51)

Minestrone?  Pea soup?


SallyBR1's picture

(post #32198, reply #3 of 51)

Actually, I went to MC database and found two options that seem great

Senegalese Chicken and Peanut Soup

Yucatan-style Chicken, Lime and Orzo Soup

Anyone here tried them?

 


 


"Born ok the first time...."

schnitzel's picture

(post #32198, reply #11 of 51)

I've made the Senegalese Chicken and Peanut Soup at least twice. It's very good. Just remember, Meanie likes it HOT!  (That's a hint. ;·)

In case you haven't already, look through all of these soup recipes.



 


Edited 2/17/2006 1:31 pm ET by schnitzel

Heather's picture

(post #32198, reply #12 of 51)

I'll second the Chicken Peanut soup--very good.
Jean's turkey soup with potatoes and spinach is good although I'm not so much of a garbanzo fan and may omit those next time. I've forgotten the exact name--Jean, help!
There are lots of variations on the Italian tomato/veggie/pasta theme. There was one here recently with ingredients from Trader Joe's--maybe from Tracy? I used to make one the kids loved (when they still lived at home) which I just winged--leftover pasta sauce augmented with canned tomatoes or sauce, sauteed onions/garlic, whatever vegetables where on hand (zucchini, broccoli, carrots, green beans, etc). Cook until almost done and then add spiral pasta (some people add tortellini), cook until done. sprinkle with lots of grated Parmesan. If you have a rind, put it in at the beginning. My kids always loved this and would eat veggies they wouldn't otherwise. And it cleaned out the fridge!

Jean's picture

(post #32198, reply #14 of 51)

Here's the turkey soup from my DD, but it doesn't have garbanzo beans in it, although it could--:)


oops didn't add the link. BRB.


http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cookstalk/messages?msg=17337.27



If lawyers are dihttp://forums.taunton.com/tp-cookstalk/messages?msg=17337.27sbarred and clergymen defrocked, doesn't it  follow  that electricians can be delighted, musicians denoted, cowboys  deranged,  models deposed, tree surgeons debarked, and dry cleaners depressed?  
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/


Edited 2/17/2006 11:58 am ET by Jean

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Heather's picture

(post #32198, reply #19 of 51)

Sorry Jean--I must have still been asleep when I posted. I confused your turkey soup and that spinach/chickpea soup from the Martha site that was posted here last month. They both have spinach in them and look similar in their freezer containers--that's my excuse.
Your soup is wonderful, the Martha soup is also very delicious but I like it better without the chickpeas. It is very creamy tasting without any dairy, apart from the Parmesan.
Here's the link for the Martha soup:

Click here: Hearty Spinach and Chickpea Soup

Sorry--that link didn't work, here is the URL. I'm on a Mac and this site doesn't like them.

http://www.marthastewart.com/page.jhtml?type=content&id=recipe2550051&layout=martha


Edited 2/17/2006 1:49 pm by Heather

Jean's picture

(post #32198, reply #20 of 51)

That is an excellent recipe!


That soup and the conversation about it (subbing barley for the brown rice) got me to experimenting and came up with what is DH's current favorite. I used a rich ham broth for the base. (I cook picnic shoulders in water and save the resultant broth for soups) We just finished up the last of that batch this noon.


http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cookstalk/messages?msg=26495.24


Now I have to go and clean up my kitchen B4 DH comes back from the grocery store.  And B4 my butt adheres to this chair.


If lawyers are disbarred and clergymen defrocked, doesn't it  follow  that electricians can be delighted, musicians denoted, cowboys  deranged,  models deposed, tree surgeons debarked, and dry cleaners depressed?  
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #32198, reply #15 of 51)

Senegalese Chicken and Peanut Soup!


Fantastic, but watch the hot stuff if you don't want really hot!


We love this soup and my neighbor swears that it is the new cure for what ails ya!

Geoffchef's picture

(post #32198, reply #23 of 51)

The Senegalese is terrific, haven't tried the other one. The yellow pepper is also very nice, as is the chipotle/sweet potato. That last one is Ming's, not sure if it's in MC's database or not, but it was recently discussed.

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #32198, reply #24 of 51)

I have. LOL  They will make you moist

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #32198, reply #4 of 51)

Have you tried Jean's Barley Soup? It's wonderful (and in T&T.)

~RuthAnn


<insert witticism here>

~RuthAnn

SallyBR1's picture

(post #32198, reply #5 of 51)

Will take a look right now, thanks

 


 


"Born ok the first time...."

MadMom's picture

(post #32198, reply #8 of 51)

Jean's barley soup is delicious, and just perfect for this weather.  Wonder if it's on my SB diet?



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PeterDurand's picture

(post #32198, reply #26 of 51)

I LOVE barley soup..will have to go and look it up. Thanks

 

Jean's picture

(post #32198, reply #6 of 51)

Glad you liked the squash soup, Sally. I'll bet the green pea polka dots was a fun garnish. Cute idea. :)

If lawyers are disbarred and clergymen defrocked, doesn't it  follow  that electricians can be delighted, musicians denoted, cowboys  deranged,  models deposed, tree surgeons debarked, and dry cleaners depressed?  
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Gretchen's picture

(post #32198, reply #7 of 51)

Somewhere around there is a red lentil/curry soup that is delicious. Do you ever just make "soup"--vegetable soup.

Gretchen

Gretchen
SallyBR1's picture

(post #32198, reply #9 of 51)

I don t think I get what you mean -

pea soup is usually beloved's domain. He has a recipe that he makes every year using turkey bones from Thanksgiving or ham bones. We had it this year already - he makes such a huge batch that we tend not to repeat it until the following winter :-)

 


 


"Born ok the first time...."

Gretchen's picture

(post #32198, reply #10 of 51)

Just a hearty vegetable soup. Good stock, onions, French cut green beans, diced carrots, celery, and any of a myriad other veggies you like. I don't care for potatoes in mine but many do.  It's just a great comfort food to us.


Gretchen
Gretchen
tones's picture

(post #32198, reply #13 of 51)

I was going to be doing research on vegetable soup this week and haven't had  extra time to do it yet.  I got a very good vegetable soup at Marie Callenders and wonder if anyone has a recipe they love with great flavor.  This restaurant's soup was very flavorful with a bit of tomato color in it but it didn't have a lot of tomoatoes which is what I want.  The seasoning was just right...not bland but not overpowering of any particular spice, I think.  I would love any ideas.  Gretchen, do you use a stock with beef or chicken?  I used to make a minestrone that I couldn't decide which was the right base.  I'd love to hear what others use.  Thank you.

Gretchen's picture

(post #32198, reply #40 of 51)

Finally back from our ski trip to the mountains.


My vegetable soup is my very rich chicken stock/broth, canned tomatoes, onions,celery, carrots, French cut green beans, occasionally butter beans (tiny),shoepeg corn, and I do think the "secret" ingredient is some finely shredded cabbage. I don't care for peas or potatoes in veggie soup.


I concocted a "green soup" from this one time for a friend who was allergic to tomatoes. My friends truly rave about it.  Just everything that is green--celery, (onions), parsley, butter beans, zucchini (diced), cabbage,okra, peas (in this one!).  It seems blah, but is not at all.


Gretchen


Edited 2/21/2006 8:47 am ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
tones's picture

(post #32198, reply #41 of 51)

Thank you, Gretchen, Madmom, and Aj12754 and of course, everyone who has posted.  Your ideas have helped me and I plan on making a veg. soup this week.  I am always blown away by this group's expertise and obvious confidence in cooking.  I have always looked and listened to find out if I should have a food mill.  When I made pea soup I used the blender (what a mess), then I experimented and made a soup with the dried peas and did not blend.  Either the family just liked the change, or they truly liked it better than the blended one, but I haven't whirled it since after their comments.  Do others see the obvious advantage in using the food mill, and what other benefits are there besides taking off the skins?  (That is a good point, though.  However, if one uses canned tomatoes, that isn't a concern, is it?  There is also that gadget that one holds and just puts in the pot to blend.  Is that worth buying also?  Thank you so much.  I hope someone asks a question that I think I could help with.

Gretchen's picture

(post #32198, reply #42 of 51)

I have never used a food mill but don't often use fresh tomatoes. And probably would peel if I did.  And my pea soup is always cooked long enough that blending of any kind really isn't needed.

Gretchen

Gretchen
AJ12754's picture

(post #32198, reply #43 of 51)

I love my hand blender -- that's what I use when I make a tomato soup with canned tomatoes -- and when I make split pea soup.


This last week-end was the first time I'd used my food mill (I saw a deal on one last summer at a kitchen store and I remembered seeing Julia Child use one in her old French Chef series and I just thought -- why not?).  My husband and I just loved how easily it took the skins off the tomatoes -- and the texture of the soup was lovely.  I don't know how often I'll use the mill (although I know I'll now be looking for additional uses) but I am glad it's in the pantry.


Good luck with your soup!


 


"Truth is the engine of our judicial system." Patrick Fitzgerald

Cave obdurationem cordis

SallyBR1's picture

(post #32198, reply #44 of 51)

Just to keep the soup thing going.... :-)

Found a pretty interesting recipe on Clotilde's blog

http://chocolateandzucchini.com/archives/2004/01/soupe_de_courgette_au_sesame.php

For next week, I am set on MC's Senegalese Chicken/Peanut

(cutting down the spices a little, for the sake of our delicate digestive system)

 


 


"The beauty of a Sally is how neatly she can be divided"
(CookiMonster, Dec 2005)

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #32198, reply #47 of 51)

For next week, I am set on MC's Senegalese Chicken/Peanut


I'll be interesting to hear how you like it.  I think I might be the only cook that was very disappointed.

whatscooking's picture

(post #32198, reply #16 of 51)

I'm currently in love with a minestrone that I found in William-Sonoma's Soups and Stews.  I have made it three weeks in a row.  I just eat it for lunch everyday.  I've gone through my back log of parmesan rinds though, so I might have to take some time off.  It is a really good recipe and makes a fantastic broth.  It has so many veggies that you just feel good after eating it.  I'll post the recipe if you'd like.

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Jean's picture

(post #32198, reply #18 of 51)

Oh, please do!

If lawyers are disbarred and clergymen defrocked, doesn't it  follow  that electricians can be delighted, musicians denoted, cowboys  deranged,  models deposed, tree surgeons debarked, and dry cleaners depressed?  
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
whatscooking's picture

(post #32198, reply #21 of 51)

Here you go.


 


Minestone from Williams-Sonoma Soups and Stews, 6-8 servings


 


2T Extra-virgin olive oil


1 slice pancetta, about 1oz, diced (I’ve made it without)


1 med. Yellow onion, diced


2 carrots, peeled and diced


2 stalks of celery, peeled and diced


1 t. minced garlic (I use more)


6 c. chicken stock


1 ½ lb tomatoes, peeled, seeded and diced. (or a 28 can of diced, drained)


1 small bunch swiss chard, stems removed, and leaves chopped coarsely


1 yukon gold potato (I usually use a few small red potatoes)


6 oz. green beans, trimmed and cut in smaller pieces(I’ve been using frozen haricots verts)


6 oz. yellow wax beans, trimmed and cut in smaller pieces (I’ve been leaving out)


2c. drained and rinsed, canned barlotti or cannelloni beans


2 -3 pieces Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese rind (optional, but a must, IMNSHO)


¼ c. chopped fresh basil


¼ c. chopped fresh Italian parsley


2t kosher salt


1/8 t ground pepper


1/2c ditallini, orzo or other tiny pasta


1/2c freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano


 


Place a large, wide, heavy saucepan over med-low heat and add the olive oil.  When hot, add the pancetta and cook, stirring until it begins to shrivel, about 3 minutes.  Add the onion, carrots, celery and garlic and stir to coat with oil.  Cover the pan and cook until veggies are very soft but not brown, about 15 minutes.


 


Add the stock and tomatoes, raise the heat to medium and cook until large bubbles appear on the surface of the liquid.  Stir in the chard, potato, green beans, canned beans cheese rind, basil, parsley, salt and pepper.  Stir well.  Reduce heat so that only small bubbles appear on the surface, cover the pan and simmer until all the vegs are soft, about 45 minutes. 


 


Add the pasta into the soup and simmer until pasta is tender and soup has thickened, about 20 minutes, depending on pasta shape.  I’ve been leaving the pasta out and cooking it separately, then combining in bowl when ready to serve.  I don’t like bloated pasta.


 


Taste and adjust seasonings.  Sprinkle with grated parm. when serving.

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Jean's picture

(post #32198, reply #22 of 51)

Sounds great, thank you.

If lawyers are disbarred and clergymen defrocked, doesn't it  follow  that electricians can be delighted, musicians denoted, cowboys  deranged,  models deposed, tree surgeons debarked, and dry cleaners depressed?  
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need