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etherhuffer's picture

As tomorrow will be warm in Seattle, I dropped in to get some Rose's Lime juice. Unfortunately, I used my brain and saw the dreaded "high fructose corn syrup" on the label. I just can't do this!


But, Roses Lime and Sweet and Sour  mixes are all sugar and lime as far as I can see. So. Cane sugar, water, lime juice should get me where I wanna go.


Any lushes make their own lime/sugar/water mixes for Margaritas?


 

avak123's picture

(post #35938, reply #1 of 44)

I typically don't use a mix--just lime juice.


edit to add my standby recipe:



Classic Margaritas - serves 16
ingredients

  • Kosher salt
  • 17 lime wedges
  • Ice
  • 3 cups (1 1/2 pints) top-quality silver tequila
  • 1 1/2 cups (12 ounces) Cointreau
  • 1 1/2 cups fresh lime juice


directions

  1. Pour a mound of salt on a plate. Run a lime wedge around the rim of each glass (preferably margarita glasses), then dip the rims in the salt to coat. Put a lime wedge in each glass or on the rim.
  2. 2. Fill a large pitcher halfway with ice and add the tequila, Cointreau and lime juice. Stir well and pour into the glasses, adding ice cubes to each glass if desired. Alternatively, fill a cocktail shaker with ice. Add 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons of tequila, 3 tablespoons of Cointreau and 3 tablespoons of lime juice. Cover and shake vigorously for 1 minute. Pour the margaritas into 2 of the glasses and add ice. Repeat with the remaining ingredients.


Edited 5/14/2008 10:51 pm ET by avak123

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #35938, reply #3 of 44)

I never make that quantity of Margaritas, but my proportion is 3 parts tequila, two parts Cointreau, one part lime juice (freshly squeezed, please!)Sometimes mixed with crushed frozen strawberries -- always in a cold, salted-rimmed glass.





"lucky in love; unlucky in metabolism"
unknown

avak123's picture

(post #35938, reply #4 of 44)

Indeed, our recipes are similar--yours, 3,2,1 and mine 3, 1.5, 1.5.


Fresh lime is a must. Also, around the holidays, I love to add a little blood orange juice.

etherhuffer's picture

(post #35938, reply #5 of 44)

All lookin good. I have found that without some sugar, the lime juice is just to acidic. This may be from the fact that store bought citrus is usually picked green.


Same problem with ceviche. I use fresh limes, but in the end, add one orange too. It keeps it tart but takes the edge off just a little.


Damn you all! Now I have to run get some fish so I can have ceviche with my Margaritas.!


 

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #35938, reply #6 of 44)

Mea culpa! <VBG!>





"lucky in love; unlucky in metabolism"
unknown

etherhuffer's picture

(post #35938, reply #7 of 44)

Guess what my in-laws brought me from Mexico? I think this may be my ingredient to make a unique margarita.

 

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gmunger's picture

(post #35938, reply #8 of 44)

Not to change the subject too much, but last weekend (Mother's Day) I helped a customer pick out a sparkling wine for mimosa....and she had a huge, beautiful mango in her hand. Yep, mango mimosas. I thought that sounded really good.

 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
Jean's picture

(post #35938, reply #2 of 44)

We just about passed out when we read HFCS on the label of some dill pickles!





Humor is a rubber sword - it allows you to make a point without drawing blood. Mary Hirsch
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Marcia's picture

(post #35938, reply #11 of 44)

Try Claussen's in the refrigerated section. Of course, they may have HFCS, too, but I don't think so, and they are the best pickles which are nationally distributed, or so I think.

Jean's picture

(post #35938, reply #12 of 44)

I really should make my own.





Humor is a rubber sword - it allows you to make a point without drawing blood. Mary Hirsch
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Marcia's picture

(post #35938, reply #13 of 44)

If you'd enjoy making pickles, you should make your own - otherwise, there must be SOME good ones out there.


But please don't make them out of a sense of duty - that's not a good reason. Homemade are wonderful, of course, but there can be pitfalls. :)

Jean's picture

(post #35938, reply #14 of 44)

When the kids were little and I was more ambitious I would can 52 quarts every year. We ate a quart of them every week back in those days. Mouth watering memories. :)





Humor is a rubber sword - it allows you to make a point without drawing blood. Mary Hirsch
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
etherhuffer's picture

(post #35938, reply #15 of 44)

Consider fresh pickles(refrigerator pickles). My Russian pals showed me how to make them with salt/dill/garlic. Once the fermentation starts, you put them in the fridge. Not good if you don't like salt however.

 

roz's picture

(post #35938, reply #21 of 44)

Oh yes! Half-sour dills! I think there is nothing better. The Vegetarian Epicure II, by Anna Thomas has a recipe for half-sours. Just a salt/sugar brine, fresh dill, lots of garlic and a red pepper with the cukes. I would let them sit in the fridge for a few weeks before eating. I made them by the gallon!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
etherhuffer's picture

(post #35938, reply #22 of 44)

I just finished a book called "Salt" and its about the history of salt and indirectly, food preservation. The lactic fermentations were very commonly used for short preservation times. I like this because pickling dills mold up too quickly and need some good use fast.

 

nexus's picture

(post #35938, reply #23 of 44)

Could you please post that recipe? Half sours were my Father's favorite and every time I eat them I think of him. The last time I bought some (an impulse purchase) the bottle cost me about $5.00. Shocking. OK, they're my favorite too.


Cheryl

roz's picture

(post #35938, reply #24 of 44)

I'm sorry...I can't post it. I don't have Anna Thomas' Vegetarian Epicure II with me in Ireland. I do remember it was something like 3/4 c. kosher salt, 2/3 c. sugar, 1 quart cool water, fresh dill, garlic (lots of it to taste) and red pepper, and washed fresh grape leaves (to mimic alum). Put washed whole (or cut lengthwise) cukes in a gallon container, layering the grape leaves, garlic and pepper with the cukes. Pour over the brine solution. Put in the fridge for a few weeks. Make sure the cukes stay submerged in the the brine. Test after a few weeks. You can also make in quart containers to fit in the fridge better. Also, make sure your containers are sterilized...and the lids, too.

Maybe your local library has this book on its shelves. I think the book dates from the late '70's or early '80's. Or do you know an old hippie?

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
nexus's picture

(post #35938, reply #27 of 44)

I do actually own the Vegitarian Epicure, but not book 2. Old hippie indeed. Thanks for the off the cuff recipe attempt; I might just play with it.


Cheryl

etherhuffer's picture

(post #35938, reply #31 of 44)

Roz, you can also use blackcurrant leaves. They give a really nice undertone. Are you sure on your sugar/salt amounts? The amount I used was much less and no sugar. But the Russian versions are usually lower in salt/sugar than our recipes.

 

roz's picture

(post #35938, reply #32 of 44)

I am totally not sure of the sugar/salt amounts! I would make them in gallon glass containers. You will have to find the recipe in that cookbook...Vegetarian Epicure II, Anna Thomas. It has been years since doing it, but I do remember a sugar/salt brine. I didn't know about the blackcurrant leaves! That is good info...definately more blackcurrant bushes here than grape vines! Thanks for that...

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
roz's picture

(post #35938, reply #25 of 44)

Trader Joe's in Tucson had some good half sours...and I don't think they were $5.00! Look there.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
nexus's picture

(post #35938, reply #28 of 44)

Thanks, I'll check that out.


Cheryl

Gretchen's picture

(post #35938, reply #26 of 44)

Oh, I made half sours for our son's DFIL, and he pronounced them VERY good. I was pretty proud. I'll look for the recipe. It was dead easy.

Gretchen

Gretchen
nexus's picture

(post #35938, reply #29 of 44)

Thank you, that would be super. I'm going to have to eat one now after reading your post.


Cheryl

Marcia's picture

(post #35938, reply #20 of 44)

Yes, I remember being more ambitious, too, but my family would never have eaten a quart of pickles a week. Pickles are something we eat or ate in spurts.


Nice to have those good memories. :)

Florida2's picture

(post #35938, reply #35 of 44)

Yes indeed on the pickles! At my major supermarket I read every single label on their selection of pickles: they all have high fructose corn syrup in them. I'm telling you, big Food is slipping in this junk wherever they can! It's enuf to make me start making my own pickles.

Gretchen's picture

(post #35938, reply #36 of 44)

Don't eat sweet stuff.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Jean's picture

(post #35938, reply #37 of 44)

But these are dill pickles--go figure!





Humor is a rubber sword - it allows you to make a point without drawing blood. Mary Hirsch
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
TracyK's picture

(post #35938, reply #39 of 44)

Not just sweet stuff.... sour pickles! Why would they need HFCS?

CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

Jean's picture

(post #35938, reply #40 of 44)

Exactly!!





Humor is a rubber sword - it allows you to make a point without drawing blood. Mary Hirsch
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need