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Need Dessert Suggestions

Cincybaker's picture

I am having out-of-town guests in May and need some suggestions for desserts for two dinners.  Ordinarily this would not be a problem since I have many tried and true dessert recipe plus many that I am anxious to try.  The problem is that one of the guests is on a low carb diet.  I have never had to watch carbs so I am not familiar with what is allowed or forbidden.  I thought maybe someone here could help me with my problem.


 


Shirley in Cincy

Cincybaker

TracyK's picture

(post #30722, reply #1 of 36)

Fresh fruit, sweetened with Splenda and topped with a bit of whipped cream, or a sweet ricotta cheese sauce, would be good... I'm sure others will be along with more suggestions!!

dlish's picture

(post #30722, reply #2 of 36)

A good low-carb dessert you could try is the "Chocolate Pavlova" from one of the FC magazines (I forgot which one -- there was a picture of it on the cover). You could make it with Splenda.

I made it once and it was good! It was chewey like a brownie.

RuthWells's picture

(post #30722, reply #5 of 36)

Did you make the chocolate pavlova with Splenda?  I've been afraid to use Splenda in any stiff-egg-white applications.

Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

dlish's picture

(post #30722, reply #6 of 36)

I didn't make that particular one with Splenda. However, I made a regular pavlova and some meringues using Splenda. There didn't seem to be any difference (betw. sugar & Splenda) in the consistencey of the "batter" or the cooked product. They turned out fine. (Did that make sense?)

Has anyone out there ever beked with Stevia? Stevia is that herbal sugar substitute.

RuthWells's picture

(post #30722, reply #18 of 36)

However, I made a regular pavlova and some meringues using Splenda. There didn't seem to be any difference (betw. sugar & Splenda) in the consistencey of the "batter" or the cooked product.


REALLY?!?!?!?  Oh my sainted aunt!  I had assumed that meringues wouldn't get stiff or stable enough without the crystaline structure of sugar helping along.  I'm going to have to try subbing Splenda.  Thanks so much, Dlish!


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

Cincybaker's picture

(post #30722, reply #19 of 36)

Sounds interesting, dlish.  Does anyone have this recipe?  I don't have my past issues.


Shirley in Cincy


 

Cincybaker

dlish's picture

(post #30722, reply #24 of 36)

I'm at work right now, so I'll have to post the Chocolate Pavlova recipe this weekend. I hope it won't be too late. Unless the FC forum monitor has it.

Li's picture

(post #30722, reply #25 of 36)

Chocolate Pavlova with Tangerine Whipped Cream
Serves eight to ten.

4 large egg whites, at room temperature
1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar
1/8 teaspoon table salt
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch
1 tablespoon red-wine vinegar
3/4 ounce (1/4 cup) unsweetened Dutch-processed cocoa powder, sifted
1 cup heavy cream
Finely grated zest of 1 tangerine (about 1 1/4 teaspoons)
1 1/2 cups fresh fruit, such as raspberries, sliced strawberries, peeled and sliced mango, or a mix
3 kiwi, peeled and sliced into half moons

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F. Cut a piece of parchment so that it fits flat on a baking sheet. With a pencil, draw a 9-inch circle in the center of the parchment (tracing a 9-inch cake pan works fine). Line the baking sheet with the parchment, pencil side facing down (you should still be able to see the circle).

Make the meringue:
With an electric hand mixer or stand mixer (use the whisk attachment), whip the egg whites, cream of tartar, and salt in a large dry bowl on medium speed until foamy, about 30 seconds. Gradually add 1 cup of the sugar and then the cornstarch and vinegar; whip on medium high until the whites hold stiff peaks and look glossy, another 3 to 5 minutes. Add the sifted cocoa powder and mix on low speed until mostly combined, 20 to 30 seconds, scraping the bowl as needed. Finish mixing the cocoa into the meringue by hand with a rubber spatula until well combined and no streaks of white remain.

Shape and bake:
Pile the meringue inside the circle on the parchment. Using the spatula, spread the meringue to even it out slightly—it doesn’t need to align perfectly with the circle, and it shouldn’t be perfectly smooth or overworked . The natural swirls and ridges give the finished meringue character.

Bake for 10 minutes and then reduce the heat to 300°F and bake until the meringue has puffed and cracked around its edges, another 45 to 50 minutes. Turn off the oven, prop the oven door open, and leave the meringue in the oven to cool to room temperature, at least 30 minutes. The delicate meringue won’t collapse as much if it cools gradually.

Assemble and serve:
Just before serving, put the meringue on a serving platter . In a chilled medium stainless-steel bowl, beat the cream with the remaining 2 tablespoons sugar until it holds soft peaks. Whip in the tangerine zest, making sure it’s evenly distributed. Pile the whipped cream on the meringue, spreading it almost out to the edge, and then top with the fruit. To serve, slice into wedges with a serrated knife.

Gale Gand, FC #62

Central Scrutinizer; Cooks Talk moderator

Only connect.

Cincybaker's picture

(post #30722, reply #28 of 36)

Thanks Li, for posting the recipe for me.  I'll have to give it a try.


Shirley in Cincy


 

Cincybaker

Li's picture

(post #30722, reply #30 of 36)

You're most welcome. Let us know how it turns out.

Central Scrutinizer; Cooks Talk moderator

Only connect.

Meryl's picture

(post #30722, reply #3 of 36)

You could do a flourless chocolate cake/torte with Splenda. 


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

Cincybaker's picture

(post #30722, reply #20 of 36)

Meryl,


Another good idea.  I'll have to check my files for a flourless cake recipe.


Shirley in Cincy

Cincybaker

Meryl's picture

(post #30722, reply #26 of 36)

Also, how about a cheesecake made with splenda? BTW, you can check the Splenda website for recipes - they have lots: www.splenda.com


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

venturedone's picture

(post #30722, reply #27 of 36)

Before you make anything with Splenda, I'd advise that you check with your guest first.  It affects some people adversely.  What it does to me shouldn't happen to a wild dog.

 


Harebrained lagomorph, prestidigitations exist for pre-adolescents.

 

Harebrained lagomorph, prestidigitations exist for pre-adolescents.

Cincybaker's picture

(post #30722, reply #29 of 36)

Venturedome,


I have never used or eaten Splenda.  From what you said, it is not just my guest that I'm concerned with, I have a pretty sensitive stomach and get effects from a lot of things.  So checking it out first is probably a good idea.  Thanks for letting me know.


Shirley in Cincy

Cincybaker

Jean's picture

(post #30722, reply #4 of 36)

Here's a web site featuring low carb desserts.


http://www.lowcarbluxury.com/lowcarb-desserts.html


Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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help to provide free mammograms for women in need
ehBeth's picture

(post #30722, reply #8 of 36)

Well, I was curious, so I wandered over to the low-carb recipe site. Things looked fine, things looked normal and then ...

http://www.lowcarbluxury.com/recipes/recipe-nibbles05.html

<gasp>

If you can't play a sport, be one.
If you can't play a sport, be one.
Jean's picture

(post #30722, reply #10 of 36)

So?? It's low carb isn't it? Nobody is asking for low fat. LOL

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
ehBeth's picture

(post #30722, reply #11 of 36)

That was just frightening. I didn't know what it was 'supposed' to be. Just thought, cinnamon, mmmmmmm, let's look at that.

If you can't play a sport, be one.
If you can't play a sport, be one.
MadMom's picture

(post #30722, reply #12 of 36)

Sorry, but that just makes me gag.



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ehBeth's picture

(post #30722, reply #13 of 36)

that would be what caused the gasp

If you can't play a sport, be one.

If you can't play a sport, be one.
Heather's picture

(post #30722, reply #14 of 36)

that is disgusting!!!

DeannaS's picture

(post #30722, reply #16 of 36)

Yah, there's a pork rind french toast - that's when I stopped looking. I think that approach to low carb is just hideous. I can abide by the south beach approach - good carbs and lower fat. But, that "I'll eat pork rinds instead of carbs" thing just makes me shudder.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #30722, reply #17 of 36)

oh, that is just so wrong.


and I like pork rinds.

(not that I eat them everyday - mayve once every couple years, until I get grossed out by what they really are...)


~RuthAnn

~RuthAnn

Cincybaker's picture

(post #30722, reply #22 of 36)

ehBeth,


I think I'll pass on that one!  I really want my house guests to remain my friends. :)


Shirley in Cincy


 

Cincybaker

butterscotch's picture

(post #30722, reply #7 of 36)

There is a recipe of Pierre Herme's that I am planning to make in a few weeks for Passover.  Have never done it myself, but it sounds very intriguing, pretty much foolproof, and, when you consider the source, likely to taste great. It involves roasting a whole peeled pineapple in the oven (like a piece of meat). Prior to roasting, short pieces of vanilla bean are stuck into the pineapple at various spots--just like cloves and garlic are stuck into pork and beef roasts. This sounds great to me because the roasting process will caramelize the natural sugars in the pineapple and vanilla flavor will infuse the whole thing. I believe there's some kind of sauce, too, to serve over the pineapple after it's been sliced-- a pureed banana is the base,if I'm remembering right. If you're interested, I'll post the recipe. 

jocelyng's picture

(post #30722, reply #15 of 36)

This sounds delicious.  I would love to try this for Passover myself.  Would you mind posting the recipe when you have a chance?


Thanks.


Jocelyn

butterscotch's picture

(post #30722, reply #32 of 36)

I'll post it over the weekend.

jocelyng's picture

(post #30722, reply #33 of 36)

Great.  That means by Monday, I'll know that at least I have charoset and roasted pineapples on the menu!  Still got a ways to go, though.


Jocelyn

Cincybaker's picture

(post #30722, reply #21 of 36)

Butterscotch,


That recipe sounds delicious!  If you could post it, I would really appreciate it. 


Shirley in Cincy

Cincybaker