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need asian viniagrette

whatscooking's picture

Can someone help me out with an asian-style salad dressing that you've tried and liked?  Sure, I can find a bunch of recipes for such a dressing, but I want one that is tried and true.   I don't feel much like experimenting.  I have one leftover grilled chicken breast and I want to make some sort of asian chicken salad for dinner tonight.


I am thinking of something a little tart or semi-sweet, that will taste good on salad greens, a little sesame flavor, but not too heavy.


 

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Gretchen's picture

(post #30907, reply #1 of 38)

Oh, get thee immediately to the Tried and True folder and print out Mean Chef's Vietnamese chicken salad.
Or alternatively, look for the peanut lime vinaigrette noodle recipe and serve it with some chopped/sliced chicken on it.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Lexi's picture

(post #30907, reply #2 of 38)

I just found Mean's recipe yesterday and printed it for future use.  Is there a secret to getting a list of all the recipes in T&T?  I can't believe that the ones that come up when you click on "All" are really all of them, and I can't figure out how else to get at them.  I also can't figure out how to ask for a specific type of recipe in T&T.  Can it be done, or do you have to scroll through all of them?

 

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #30907, reply #3 of 38)

To get more recipes go all the way to the bottom of the list of everything and click on "next 50".


Schnitzel has made a category list and I thought I had it bookmarked but can't find it.  Someone will come along with a link


Gretchen
Gretchen
KarenP's picture

(post #30907, reply #4 of 38)

I just found Mean's recipe yesterday and printed it for future use.  Is there a secret to getting a list of all the recipes in T&T? 


It works kind of goofy.  You have to scroll to the bottom of the page to get the next 50.  The easier way is to find a post from schnitzel and click on her link to the tried and true archive that she created at recipe circus.  She's done a great job!


 

Jean's picture

(post #30907, reply #5 of 38)

Here's Amy's web page.


http://recipecircus.com/recipes/Schnitzel/


Now everyone bookmark it, OK?


Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Lexi's picture

(post #30907, reply #6 of 38)

Fabulous!  Thanks to everyone.

 

 

samchang's picture

(post #30907, reply #7 of 38)

So you want Thai, Vietnamese, Japanese, Chinese, Indonesian . . . ?

Here's a tried and true one: it's Chinese inspired using occidental technique:

In a bowl, pour in 1 Tbs soy paste (NOT sauce), 2 tsp sugar (I use raw sugar, which is a bit sweeter than the white stuff), 1/2 tsp sesame oil, and 1 Tbs Chinese black vinegar. Whisk until thickened. Add 2 Tbs peanut oil and whisk until emulsified. The soy paste, BTW, is the emulsifier, taking the place of mustard or peanut butter, which is why you can't use soy sauce.

You can easily doctor this recipe: add chopped garlic or ginger juice, scale up or down, whatever. It comes together in about 30 seconds, and it will have your guests wondering what in the world you did.


Edited 5/23/2005 6:45 pm ET by samchang

whatscooking's picture

(post #30907, reply #8 of 38)

I was looking for Chinese.  Thanks for this recipe, I probably won't use it tonight, but I'm intrigued.  I guess I'll be looking for soy paste.

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #30907, reply #9 of 38)

I'll be searching out soy paste at my Asian market.  Certainly you didn't mean this product!


Healthy Sexy Hair soy paste

Heather's picture

(post #30907, reply #10 of 38)

Thanks for the morning giggle. Are you going to try it?

elizaram's picture

(post #30907, reply #11 of 38)

Gee, your hair smells delicious!



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

samchang's picture

(post #30907, reply #12 of 38)

Rats. My cooking secret has been unearthed!

Kimlan makes a good soy paste. It's in the soy sauce section, in tall plastic bottles, but read the label carefully--for some reason, the chili soy paste is in an identically colored and labelled bottle save for those small words, "chili soy paste."

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #30907, reply #13 of 38)

Thanks.  I'll look for the Kimlan brand, but, can I use it on my hair?

ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #30907, reply #15 of 38)

Thanks for the recipe...I am always trying to find the perfect Asian "sauce/dressing"  there are a few that I really like (MC's Chili-lime :o! , but your directions are intriguing and I would like to know if the ingredients that I have on hand are good enough.


Mitsukan Brown Rice Vinegar, instead of, Chinese black vinegar, red or white soy bean paste and there is still one other that I can use...I am quite used to your suggested additions and in fact, made a change or two with the current issue of FC in the Asian Dressing line on the chicken wings.


Thank you, yet again, for your wonderful additions.


 


 

samchang's picture

(post #30907, reply #16 of 38)

Chinese black vinegar, alas, has a taste of its own, unreplicated by any other. It should be easy enough to find nowdays, though. Also, soy paste is not the same as soy bean paste: the latter is thick, while the soy paste pours out of a bottle, with just a little looser consistency than oyster sauce. Soy paste is just thickened soy sauce, but that thickening does wonders for the tecture of the sauce. It lets the sauce stick around in the mouth and is not that sharp or salty. Rather, it is quite mild and savory. It is hard to describe the flavor, actually.

ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #30907, reply #17 of 38)

Thanks for the information...I will try to find the vinegar and soy paste that you have described.  Our best Asian Market went out of business and the two that I know are left are very small stores that specialize in Japanese products only.  So it is time to visit one of them or I will get one of my friends in the big city to shop for me. 


Thanks again.

Adele's picture

(post #30907, reply #18 of 38)

Chinese black vinegar


I love this and have used it straight as a dipping sauce,  I've also sprinkled it on salads.


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

samchang's picture

(post #30907, reply #23 of 38)

Straight up, it's really good with dumplings.

And I'm not sure if this counts as Asian or not, but since Indonesians love eating cooked vegetables with a peanut sauce, I played around with the concept some time back, replacing the mustard in a normal vinaigrette with smooth peanut butter. And you know what? It works! Someone told me I should use grape jelly for a sweetener, but that sounded a bit whacky. The best ones were mixed with a bit of curry paste, although now I'm wondering how a hit of coconut milk would work.

oliveoil's picture

(post #30907, reply #25 of 38)

Now that I have Chinese black vinegar and the soy paste, what else can I do with them?

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #30907, reply #26 of 38)

I guess you can put the soy paste in your hair . . . just kidding.

nutcakes's picture

(post #30907, reply #27 of 38)

You can make Orchid's Tany and Cool Noodles. Having this in the fridge is like money in the bank--it keeps for a week. You can top it with chicken and cucumber if you like, but I like it just the way it is. I must have posted in the past but can't find. If memory is right:

3-1/2 Tbsp Black Soy Sauce (this is the extra dark thick kind you have to buy in a Chinese market, it clings to noodles instead of running off like regular soy sauce would).
3-1/2 Tbsp Sesame Oil
2 tsp Chinese Black Vinegar or Balsalmic vinegar
squeeze of hot chile oil
I think it has sugar but I can't remember how much maybe 2 Tbsp???Maybe someone can check Modern Art of Chinese Cooking by Barbara Tropp
2 Tbsp chopped scallion

I toss this with a package of fresh chinese noodles. Ready in a couple hours, but flavor deepens overnight. Sprinkle 2 Tbsp fresh scallions on before serving.

Gretchen's picture

(post #30907, reply #28 of 38)

So, where ya been? Welcome back.

Gretchen

Gretchen
nutcakes's picture

(post #30907, reply #29 of 38)

Hi - see sanderson's brunch thread. Not cooking much. Work, work, work and much crazyness.

Anyway this recipe is one I don't mind making for one. Otherwise, I really hate cooking for myself these days. I am living on bread, goat cheese and eggplant spread this week.

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #30907, reply #30 of 38)

It's good to see you back.  Hope you stay awhile.

Heather's picture

(post #30907, reply #34 of 38)

"Orchid's Tangy and Cool Noodles. . . If memory is right:
3-1/2 Tbsp Black Soy Sauce
3-1/2 Tbsp Sesame Oil
2 tsp Chinese Black Vinegar or Balsalmic vinegar
squeeze of hot chile oil
I think it has sugar but I can't remember how much maybe 2 Tbsp???Maybe someone can check Modern Art of Chinese Cooking by Barbara Tropp
2 Tbsp chopped scallions"

Nutcakes, this dish sounds delicious. Do you or does anyone else know how much sugar to add?

Jean's picture

(post #30907, reply #35 of 38)

Yes, it's 2 tablespoons.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
nutcakes's picture

(post #30907, reply #36 of 38)

Thanks Jean! Please try this Heather. It is just so good and simple. It needs a couple hours of chilling or (preferable) overnight for the flavors to meld. And it keeps well for almost a week.

Heather's picture

(post #30907, reply #37 of 38)

Thanks Jean and Nutcakes--I'm looking forward to trying this. I'll have to make a visit to my Asian market first. sounds like a great summer meal with some chicken.

nutcakes's picture

(post #30907, reply #38 of 38)

You have to use that Black Soy Sauce so it will cling to the noodles. Regular soy sauce just runs off. I really wanted to make these today, but I don't have any on hand and can't find it in the regular market. I like Koon Chun brand that has a distinctive yellow and blue label. Pearl River Bridge is a good brand for any product in general.

While googling, I found this orange flavored chicken wings recipe that uses Black Soy Sauce from Staff Meals at Chantrelle. This sounds so good!
http://www.globalgourmet.com/food/special/2001/chanterelle/chicken.html

samchang's picture

(post #30907, reply #31 of 38)

You can make all sorts of dipping sauces with the soy paste. Mix some with chile bean sauce, sugar, sesame oil, and garlic, and you've pretty much got the basis for a Szechuan sauce for white cooked pork. Alter the proportions and you've got a dumpling sauce. It's very versatile stuff.

As for the vinegar, you can of course use it as a replacement for any type of vinegar, but its distinctive taste may overpower some applications. There are 2 things to do with it that come to mind. The first is as part of a braising liquid for 1-2-3-4-5 pork ribs, so called because it requires 1 part shiaoxing wine, 2 parts black vinegar, 3 parts sweetener (anything from white sugar to maple syrup [which is what I prefer]), 4 parts dark soy, and 5 parts water. The 'parts' can be any measure you wish, i.e., tabelspoons, cups, bottle caps, 5 gallon containers, or what have you depending on the amount of pork ribs you have. The second way to use it is as a glaze. Put equal parts of honey and black vinegar in a pot with a pinch of salt, and heat until melted together. This is the glaze that new-fangled Cantonese restaurants in Hong Kong use to pour over fried pork ribs. It's a fantastic dish that really shows off the vinegar, but the glaze can't really stand after making since the volatile aromatics of the vinegar get lost after a while.