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molds for brioche - what can i use

foodie's picture

i made 2.25 lbs of brioche dough, will be baking it tomorrow. i don't have the traditional brioche molds, any suggestions as to what can be used?

MER02's picture

(post #28963, reply #1 of 30)

i would try muffin tins, the closest that i can imagine.

Biscuits's picture

(post #28963, reply #2 of 30)

That's what I used, until I got brioche tins.


Or you could do half in muffin tins, and half in a regular loaf pan.  That way,  you can use the loaves of brioche for the best french toast you ever ate, or - my favorite! - twice baked brioche!


 

Ancora Imparo -

MER02's picture

(post #28963, reply #3 of 30)

yum... a whole brioche loaf... :)

is brioche a pain to do?

sandermom's picture

(post #28963, reply #4 of 30)

umm...did you mean paine?   What's for snacks in the corner?

Klaatu Barada Nikto

Wolvie's picture

(post #28963, reply #5 of 30)

I do brioche in loaf pans all the time. It's great. My Mom loves it just for toast. It's also then conviently shaped for bread puddings. The muffin tins work great tho too.


If you have the French Laundry cookbook, try their version. It's a tad richer than Silvertons, and reflects brioche the way it should be, IMO. For the ultimate indulgence, make the mousseline brioche that Cookimonster posted awhile back. Heaven!


"So beautifully arranged on the plate - you know someone's fingers have been all over it."
Julia Child

 

Tuck's picture

(post #28963, reply #6 of 30)

I do too and I shape it in a loaf shape as well.  I like the French Laundry Brioche and found I Madeline Kamman's mousseline brioche a bit more difficult, in other words, I made quite a mess (I wasn't patient enough) and wasn't quite as successful with it - I'll try another day since it's a technique I need to practice.


~tuck
“A good dish is like a piece of music. It needs harmony, but, most of all, it must have clarity.”

foodie's picture

(post #28963, reply #7 of 30)

i baked them this morning in 2 large loaf pans using the "6 balls" technique. they came out very nice and we already consumed one, the second one is headed straight to the freezer. thanks everyone!


i used nancy silverton's recipe from baking with julia but noticed that it's slightly lighter than in her pastry book where she uses more eggs and butter.

Biscuits's picture

(post #28963, reply #8 of 30)

I really like Nancy Silverton's recipe.


Since you have the book, and you've got an extra loaf (G) you should try the twice-baked brioche.  O-M-Heaven!!!!!  It's absolutely delicious.


 

Ancora Imparo -

foodie's picture

(post #28963, reply #9 of 30)

next time i'll make her viennese cream version w/creme fraiche and the twice baked; the one in the freezer is reserved for my favorite chicken liver pate to be made at some future date.

ceb1's picture

(post #28963, reply #12 of 30)

Chicken liver patte ??


Would you share your recipe ? I have a bunch of chicken liver in the freezer that I need to use and a pate sound great.

ashleyd's picture

(post #28963, reply #13 of 30)

Not foodie but this is an interesting take on chicken liver pate


Chicken Liver and Apple Paté

Serves 6


1 lb chicken livers


4 shallots


2 cloves garlic


3 apples (Coxes or Granny Smith)


8 oz (two sticks) butter


4 tbsp Calvados (or brandy)


2 tbsp caster (superfine) sugar


salt and pepper


fresh mint for garnish


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Peel the shallots and chop them finely.  Peel the garlic and chop finely or crush.  Trim any membranes or unpleasant bits from the chicken livers.  Core and peel two of the apples and cut into ½" dice.  Melt 1 oz of butter in a frying pan and sauté the apples with salt and pepper, stirring frequently, until tender, about 5 - 7 mins.  Remove the apples with a slotted spoon and save.  Add another ounce of butter to the pan and add the chicken livers with salt and pepper and fry rapidly, stirring, until brown on the outside, 2 - 3 minutes.  Add the shallots and garlic and continue to cook until the shallots are slightly softened, about 1 - 2 minutes.  The livers should be very brown on the outside but still pink in the centre.  Add Calvados, bring it to the boil and set light (very carefully at arm's length!) to it.  Baste the livers with the juices until the flames subside (use a long handled basting spoon).


Let the livers cool slightly and then put the mixture into a liquidiser or food processor with 5 oz butter and purée until almost smooth.  Scrape out the purée into a bowl and mix in the apples with a wooden spoon.  Spoon the mixture into 6 ramekins and smooth the tops with the back of a spoon dipped in hot water so that it does not stick to the paté.  Cover and chill until firm.  At this stage they can be kept for up to 2 days in the fridge and the flavour will mature.


For the garnish core the remaining apple (you can leave it unpeeled if you wish) and cut it into 6 slices through the hollow core so that you have 6 apples rings (discard the ends).  Melt the remaining 1 oz butter in the frying pan, add the apple slices and sprinkle them with half the sugar.  Turn the slices over and sprinkle with the remaining sugar.  Fry the apple slices over medium heat, about 2 - 3 mins per side, until they are caramelised and brown.  Remove them and place on a piece of non-stick baking paper (you can use a plate but the slices tend to stick to it).


When ready to serve place an apple ring on top of each of the patés and garnish with a sprig of mint.  Serve with toasted wholemeal bread.  You can cut the bread into circles with a pastry cutter before toasting if you want it to look a little more elegant, otherwise just cut the toast into triangles and serve at once.


 


"Appreciation is a wonderful thing; it makes what is excellent in others belong to us as well."
Voltaire

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Gretchen's picture

(post #28963, reply #14 of 30)

That sounds delicious and interesting. Do I understand that the apples are not pureed in with the livers and so are sort of discrete chunks within the pate?

Gretchen

Gretchen
ashleyd's picture

(post #28963, reply #15 of 30)

You understand absolutely correctly! You keep getting these little bursts of sweetness in the pate plus a different texture which makes a nice change.

"Appreciation is a wonderful thing; it makes what is excellent in others belong to us as well."
Voltaire

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Adele's picture

(post #28963, reply #16 of 30)

This sounds really tasty.  I had made a liver pate from someone here a year or so ago and enjoyed it.


Of course, I have to ask about the Calvados, (sigh), can I leave it out?  Substitute with????? (Re- no alcohol)


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

MER02's picture

(post #28963, reply #17 of 30)

no idea about the recipe, but if you have to sub out cavedos, what about some apple cider? ( if you need the moisture ) it wont be as strong as the liquor, but it will have much more flavor than apple juice

ashleyd's picture

(post #28963, reply #18 of 30)

Seems about right, maybe two tablespoons because you're not going to burn it off like the Calvados.

"Appreciation is a wonderful thing; it makes what is excellent in others belong to us as well."
Voltaire

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

doyenne's picture

(post #28963, reply #20 of 30)

Sure you can. Boil apple juice until it is reduced by half and use that in place of the Calvados.

I can't remember today what it was I  couldn't remember yesterday

Where is Monica Lewinski when you need her?

Adele's picture

(post #28963, reply #21 of 30)

Thanks all!  I've already copied the recipe and have everything I need on my list for the next store run.   Looks like I'll be trying it this weekend.


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Gretchen's picture

(post #28963, reply #22 of 30)

You could also use frozen apple juice concentrate.  Unlike others, and perhaps because of our location, I often think cider is not as flavorful.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Adele's picture

(post #28963, reply #23 of 30)

I agree totally on the flavor of cider, especially down here.  That is just another thing that I miss during the fall from the veggie place that went under.  To tell you the truth, I was going to buy frozen concentrate, as I know it would be useless to even look for cider.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

foodie's picture

(post #28963, reply #19 of 30)

Chicken liver pate

 


1lb chicken livers


1 shallot minced


1/2 cup heavy cream, whipped lightly


3 TBSP madera


salt, pepper, cinnamon, nutmeg to taste


 


Trim chicken livers.  Melt butter and sauté shallot, add the chicken livers, spices and wine - they should simmer in butter! Do not over cook, s/b pink in the center.


Process in Cusinart while still hot, chill for 20 min. on an ice bath, stir 3-4 times to set properly.


Fold in whipped cream, pour into a serving dish, chill. Serve w/brioche and sliced apples. Rich and wonderful!

Adele's picture

(post #28963, reply #24 of 30)

Chicken Liver and Apple Paté

Thanks for the recipe Ashley- this is a keeper. Made it this morning, I did substitute frozen apple juice for the Calvados. Put 8 tbs in a pan and reduced to 4. Of course, I didn't get to play with setting it on fire :(, but followed everything else. The pate itself is nice and light with a wonderful flavor from the apple. The diced apples (will make 1/4 dice next time, just because it was a bit awkward to spread) are a nice surprise when taking a bite.

I do hope I can freeze this, just a bit much for one person. Didn't think of halfing the recipe until I filled the last ramekin. LOL

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

TracyK's picture

(post #28963, reply #25 of 30)

Hey Adele-- Here's another chicken liver pate for you to try... I love this recipe, and I don't even like chicken livers. :-)


 



"Noncooks think it's silly to invest two hours' work in two minutes' enjoyment; but if cooking is evanescent, so is the ballet."


Julia Child

Adele's picture

(post #28963, reply #26 of 30)

Thanks Tracy, printed for next time.  I am just assuming here, that the 1/2 teaspoon, yes, 1/2 teaspoon of cognac can be left out.  (Just kidding!)


On Ashelys' recipe, I now realize it doesn't matter if I dice 1/2 or 1/4, as it gets cut when you use the knife. (duh!)


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

TracyK's picture

(post #28963, reply #27 of 30)

I'm sure you could leave it out! :-)


"Noncooks think it's silly to invest two hours' work in two minutes' enjoyment; but if cooking is evanescent, so is the ballet."


Julia Child

Cissy's picture

(post #28963, reply #28 of 30)

ashleyd, this sounds wonderful.  I'm planning on making the pate, packing it into a thin, straight-sided loaf pan and placing the apple slices slightly overlapped across the top.  Thanks.


 

ashleyd's picture

(post #28963, reply #29 of 30)

That's the presentation I use, mix a little clear apple juice (or cider) with gelatin to give a glaze over the apple, really does look good.

"Appreciation is a wonderful thing; it makes what is excellent in others belong to us as well."
Voltaire

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Wolvie's picture

(post #28963, reply #10 of 30)

the mousseline is tricky, that's why CM insisted I try it as written the first time. My hands ached for a couple of days. Oy! ;-)


I have since figured out how to do it with the KA mixer, and it comes out exactly the same. Having made  it first by hand made all the difference - I knew what I was looking for dough wise. It makes heavenly cinnamon rolls. 


"So beautifully arranged on the plate - you know someone's fingers have been all over it."
Julia Child

 

Biscuits's picture

(post #28963, reply #11 of 30)

Oh!  Brioche based cinnamon rolls are absolute heaven!!!!

 

Ancora Imparo -

Tuck's picture

(post #28963, reply #30 of 30)

I think any brioche dough makes great cinnamon rolls.  One of these days I'll give it another try.


~tuck
“A good dish is like a piece of music. It needs harmony, but, most of all, it must have clarity.”