NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Minestrone soup question

teebee's picture

I am going to make Tony Rosenfeld's Roasted vegetable minestrone soup tomorrow. It calls for cannellini beans, but I could only find Great Northern Beans (as well as the red kidney beans it called for). What is the difference? Can I use the Great Northern Beans?

One more question, please. He doesn't call for any meat in the recipe. DH is a meat kind of guy and would like some in the soup. Any suggestions as to what meat to put in?

Thanks for your help (as always!).

dorcast's picture

(post #36899, reply #1 of 20)

I make minestrone (Giada's) with pancetta. Saute it at the beginning with the carrots, onion & celery.

If he wants more meat, I would add some sausage. I haven't tried the recipe, but the New England Soup Factory Minestrone calls for cooking sausage in the oven, then slicing and adding when you add the beans.

teebee's picture

(post #36899, reply #6 of 20)

I will add the sausage, as I don't have pancetta (and can't get it in town). Thanks!

Glenys's picture

(post #36899, reply #2 of 20)

Traditionally minestrone does not have meat; minestrone Genovese doesn't use stock either, it's peasant soup with restorative powers. Cannellini beans are like white kidney beans except petite, GN's are just fine. When I'm not in the mood to cook the GN's I use baby lima beans. Actually I prefer their buttery quality and they cook from hard to soft in about half an hour, without a pressure cooker.
Add the sausage for meat-man.

Jean's picture

(post #36899, reply #3 of 20)

That's it! I'm making minestrone today. BTW, I've always wondered if you pronounce the 'e' on the end?


You can't change the past, but you can ruin the present by worrying over the future.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
ashleyd's picture

(post #36899, reply #5 of 20)

I once saw it described on a menu as "Ministroni soup". Phonetically correct but points off for spelling!


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

teebee's picture

(post #36899, reply #7 of 20)

What recipe are you using? I always worry that a different recipe will be better than the one that I am using, and wonder what's different.

Jean's picture

(post #36899, reply #8 of 20)

The one from the NE Soup Cookbook.  Madmommed a bit of course. It makes a huge pot. I think there are as many recipes as there are Italians. Hee.  I'm putting venison sausage in my version.


You can't change the past, but you can ruin the present by worrying over the future.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Marie Louise's picture

(post #36899, reply #10 of 20)

I've always used Marcella's recipe. I love it.

I also make MM versions. I've made a Mexican version-recipe from Sunset, IIRC- that is quite tasty.

Lee's picture

(post #36899, reply #11 of 20)

My minestrone is based on Marcella's recipe, too.  I don't know how it could be improved. 

teebee's picture

(post #36899, reply #13 of 20)

Is that Marcella Hazan? I have Essentials of Classic Italian... I'll check it out. Thanks!

Marie Louise's picture

(post #36899, reply #14 of 20)

Yes-the one that came out 10 or 15 years ago.

Marie Louise's picture

(post #36899, reply #15 of 20)

BTW, here is the Mexican Minestrone recipe (it references Marcella's recipe, but any one could be used.)

Mexican Minestrone

Make as above, except change the ingredients as follows:

Decrease onions to 1 cup & add 2 small or 1 large leeks; Add 1 cup chopped red bell pepper and 1 tablespoon minced garlic. Delete potatoes. Add 2 teaspoons chili powder, 1 to 2 chopped chipotle in adobo (to taste) & 2 teaspoons dry oregano or 1 tablespoon fresh oregano to taste. Add 2 cups of water in addition to 6 cups stock & the tomatoes. Substitute 3 cups cooked pinto or kidney beans for cannelloni beans. Add 1 cup (2 ounces) uncooked small macaroni at the same time as beans.

adapted from a recipe by Jacqueline McMahan in the SF Chronicle

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #36899, reply #16 of 20)

I have been making this one lately.  It is excellent.



Winter Minestrone




List of Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 onion, chopped
2 carrots, peeled,chopped
2 stalks celery, chopped
3 ounces thinly sliced pancetta, coarsely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 lb swiss chard, stems trimmed,leaves coarsely chopped
1 russet potato, peeled,cubed
1 (14 1/2 ounce) can diced tomatoes
1 sprig fresh rosemary
1 (15 ounce) can cannellini beans, drained,rinsed
2 (14 ounce) cans low sodium beef broth
1 ounce parmesan cheese, rind
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
salt and pepper



Recipe

Heat the oil in a heavy large pot over medium heat.
Add the onion, carrots, celery, pancetta, and garlic.
Saute until the onion is translucent, about 10 minutes.
Add the Swiss chard and potato; saute for 2 minutes.
Add the tomatoes and rosemary sprig.
Simmer until the chard is wilted and the tomatoes break down, about 10 minutes.
Meanwhile, blend 3/4 cup of the beans with 1/4 cup of the broth in a processor until almost smooth.
Add the pureed bean mixture, remaining broth, and Parmesan cheese rind to the vegetable mixture.
Simmer until the potato pieces are tender, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes.
Stir in the whole beans and parsley.
Simmer until the beans are heated through and the soup is thick, about 2 minutes.
Season with salt and pepper, to taste.
Discard Parmesan rind and rosemary sprig (the leaves will have fallen off of the stem.) Ladle the soup into bowls and serve.


dorcast's picture

(post #36899, reply #17 of 20)

Is that the Giada recipe? I really like it too. I usually add pasta instead of potato.
I'm going to make it tomorrow, this thread put me in the mood.

teebee's picture

(post #36899, reply #19 of 20)

"I'm going to make it tomorrow..."

See what I started!! It's comfort food time!

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #36899, reply #20 of 20)

teebee's picture

(post #36899, reply #18 of 20)

Thank you for the recipe--I am printing it right now. I made Tony Rosenfeld's Minestrone with the roasted vegetables. It was really good (but a little time consuming). I made a double batch, as we'll be home all weekend and it will be eaten for lunch several days. I will try your recipe next time. It was snowy and cold (19) here today, so having something simmering on the stove and roasting in the oven was very nice! Happy New Year!

Thanks to everyone for the feedback!

Lee's picture

(post #36899, reply #12 of 20)

I've always wondered if you pronounce the 'e' on the end?


You should, but Italians don't pronounce it as  "eee;" it's closer to an "eh" sound.  Of course, we Americanos say "minestroneee."


Edited 12/31/2008 12:40 pm ET by lee

teebee's picture

(post #36899, reply #4 of 20)

Thanks for your response. Your responses are always so helpful, informative, yet gentle (sometimes I think that I am asking a stupid question or one with an obvious answer, but you never respond like I am). I bet that you are a really good teacher.

I will toss in the sausage. "Meat Man" needs his sustenance. He is as passionate about his woodworking as I am about cooking, and is always working around the house. We had an addition put on last year, and I swear he would do more in one weekend than the 6-man construction crew did all week, and I'm not trying to slam the crew--they were great! Thanks again for your help.

Sondra's picture

(post #36899, reply #9 of 20)

My favorite minestrone recipe is from the second Silver Palate book.  Uses cannellinis, but GN's fine.  The recipe calls for beef broth which gives it a nice rich taste without meat, and adds cheese tortellini and sauteed Italian sausage slices at the end. 


Happy to email the recipe to you if you wish.  We're serving it at a "soup/salad/bread/dessert" neighborhood get together this coming Saturday.