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Milk powder ratio in homemade ice cream

digger655's picture

I've been reading about using milk powder to improve the texture/firmness of homemade ice cream, but cannot find a general formula to use. Most recipes don't call for it and we often increase/decrease the original recipe. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Beth

mishmish's picture

(post #35660, reply #1 of 9)

If you have FC issue 10 there are some recipes that use skim milk powder. Great ice cream! This is the recipe we use in my house. Don't have time to type it out now but the basic proportions for 1 1/2 quarts are
2c heavy cream
1c skim milk
1/2 - 1c sugar
pinch salt
1/4c skim milk powder
5 large egg yolks
and flavorings and additions as desired

Heat base ingred. in bowl over simmering water to between 165 and 180
keep the temp in that range for 10-15 min.
put bowl in an ice bath and cool to 65
chill for at least 4 hours

I know every FC recipe is supposed to be on the website now if you pay the fee but I guess I am search challenged --can't find it.

Don't let your mind wander. It's much to small to be out by itself.
Don't let your mind wander. It's much to small to be out by itself.
digger655's picture

(post #35660, reply #2 of 9)

Thanks for the recipe. I'm trying to figure out how much milk powder to put in a choc. ice cream recipe that has 4 cups of liquid. I'm thinking about trying 1/3 cup.

Beth

Lazio1954's picture

(post #35660, reply #3 of 9)

Giorgio Locatelli (Made in Italy Food and Stories) has quite an in depth section on ice creams as his restaurant makes all their own. He uses aprox 10% milk powder to liquid ratio. He also uses dextrose in place of one third the total ammount of sugars to cut back on crystalization.

Silvana

We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.
Winston Churchill

Silvana We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. Winston Churchill
Gretchen's picture

(post #35660, reply #4 of 9)

So, how does it improve the texture specifically. Thanks.

Gretchen

Gretchen
gourmand's picture

(post #35660, reply #5 of 9)

The solids supposedly add body when not using cream. Myself, the few times I make it, I'm going to uses cream.

 Growing old is inevitable, Growing up is optional.

 Growing old is inevitable, Growing up is optional.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #35660, reply #6 of 9)

Do you use all cream or a combo of cream and milk?


I don't like the mouthfeel AT ALL when all cream is used, it feels gross to me. I always use a combo but lots o'yolks, lest anyone think I'm trying to slip a lowfat ice cream on them :)


Never tried the dry milk though since I am generally pleased with the texture. I suppose it boosts the protein a bit :)


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

gourmand's picture

(post #35660, reply #7 of 9)

I totally agree! I only make it 3 or 4 times a year when friends or family come down to the lake. I use half cream and half 1/2&1/2. I found a Mennonite farmer this winter that will sell fresh, the real deal! I have been making Doc Wilson's for over 10 years. Leftovers remain in the freezer and never get rock hard or ice crystals. Know it is not for everybody so save your comments.


http://www.users.nwark.com/~piperw/flavorp.htm



 Growing old is inevitable, Growing up is optional.


Edited 3/7/2008 11:44 am ET by gourmand

 Growing old is inevitable, Growing up is optional.

Lazio1954's picture

(post #35660, reply #8 of 9)

He uses milk powder in addition to full fat and cream to boost the "milk flavour" richness without adding more fat.


The different sugars all have different resistance to freezing, and different sweetening capacities. This means that you can up the quantity of different sugars (the less sweet ones) to give you maximum anti crystallization properties, without taking the sweetness up with it.


Shirley O Corriher has a good section in Cookwise as well.


Silvana

We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.
Winston Churchill

Silvana We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. Winston Churchill
Debby's picture

(post #35660, reply #9 of 9)

That article in issue #10--"The Key to Smooth, Rich, Homemade Ice Cream" is great! (I do love this new site where we can find info from issues we've never had!) It discusses the fact that over 14 to 20 % butterfact makes the ice cream "stiff and greasy".  The 'secret' seems to be the use of skim milk powder.  It "helps to stabilize the emulsion without adding fat.  It does this by absorbing most of the extra water in the ice cream mixture."  "Instead of turning icy after two or three days in the freezer, ice cream that's made with skim milk powder should last a few weeks." 


Anna Olsen  (Sugar) claims that a tablespoon of skim milk powder in whipped cream helps to keep it stable; slows it from becoming 'weepy' as it sits.  I know that this does  indeed work well.


I'm going to try one of these recipes from Article 10 by Hingston--Although homemade ice cream generally doesn't last long in our house, I have been disappointed with the texture and iciness of some that I've made. 


Thanks for bringing this article to light!


Debby