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Merlot ?

javajitters's picture

I opened a bottle of Merlot about one week ago, used half and recorked the bottle.  I spaced putting it in the fridge and am wondering if I can still use it?  Does opened wine go bad?


Thanks in advance

Risottogirl's picture

(post #36763, reply #1 of 29)

It doesn't get any better once open, that's for sure. Taste it and see what you think. If it tastes okay to you, drink it, otherwise don't hesitate to use it for cooking. After a couple of days, open red wine around here usually gets relegated to cooking wine :)


 



Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay



Edited 11/30/2008 3:25 pm ET by Risottogirl

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

javajitters's picture

(post #36763, reply #2 of 29)

Thanks, I opened it for cooking.  Do I need to refrigerate it, or does it matter?

ashleyd's picture

(post #36763, reply #3 of 29)

Once opened it starts to oxidize, keeping it in the fridge will slow that reaction down. It is unlikely to go off completely, just lose its flavour and become vinegary so if it smells OK you can still use it for cooking.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

javajitters's picture

(post #36763, reply #4 of 29)

Okay, thank you.  I'll refrigerate it.

thecooktoo's picture

(post #36763, reply #5 of 29)

Whether you drink it or cook with it will most often depend on whether there is another bottle in the house to drink!


When I have a recipe that calls for red wine, I almost always have to open a new bottle.  Then we drink that bottle.  I rarely have a need for corking or recorking bottles.


But, if you don't drink it all...refrigerating red or white wine will increase it's shelf life once opened.  My experience has been 3 or 4 days for reds in the fridge and a week or so for whites.


Jim


 

MadMom's picture

(post #36763, reply #6 of 29)

Jim, I was sort of wondering about how anyone could have wine which wasn't drunk as soon as the bottle was opened, but was afraid to ask.  Hate to sound like a lush, LOL.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

thecooktoo's picture

(post #36763, reply #8 of 29)

Yea, I have a Vacu Vin system that evacuates the air from bottles, but I sure don't have worry about wearing out the little rubber cork things.  Between cooking, sitting around drinking and just generally enjoying the wine, we open at least five or so bottles a week and sometimes more if we have to use some of it to cook with.


Jim

MadMom's picture

(post #36763, reply #9 of 29)

Amen, brother!  I understand that wine is medicinal, isn't it?  Lordy, but I do take a lot of medicine, LOL.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

gmunger's picture

(post #36763, reply #22 of 29)

I was sort of wondering about how anyone could have wine which wasn't drunk as soon as the bottle was opened, but was afraid to ask. 


It happens when one is inundated with wine samples and has limited time for tasting. But it moistens the compost pile very well.  (:


To all: Actually, I ideally like to spend several days with a bottle. It's interesting to see how a wine, once opened, evolves/devolves as oxidation has it's way. It is oftens the case that a wine shows best on the 3rd or 4th day. Some folks look askance at me for asserting this, but my experience (as well as that of trusted vina compadres) confirms this over and again. Slow and easy wins the race.


 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
MadMom's picture

(post #36763, reply #23 of 29)

You know, you're right.  DH will often open a bottle of wine which seems a bit harsh to me, but when we drink it the following night, it is quite good.  Of course, we're not wine connoisseurs, but that has been my experience.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

ashleyd's picture

(post #36763, reply #24 of 29)

I'm really glad you said this because it fits with my experience too. Far too many people (many of whom should know better) say that you should only keep wine for a day or two after you have opened it. This, in most cases, is rubbish. I have known fine wines with some age that that have died completely within a few hours of opening, but that's not the kind of wine most people are using for cooking - at least I sincerely hope not.  For modern-style wines of less than a year or two old you can keep them for a week or more (recorked and in the fridge) and they will be perfectly fine at least for cooking. For red wines, once you have let them warm up a bit, a day or two after opening they will probably be better for drinking, and white wines won't come to any harm either. It won't go seriously off, i.e. will not become hazardous to your health, for many weeks so a quick sniff will tell you whether or not it is worth using and a quick sip will tell you if it's worth drinking.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

thecooktoo's picture

(post #36763, reply #25 of 29)

I recently served a bordeaux that the client had in his cellar with dinner.  It was absolutely magnificent!


But with one of the bottles, only for the first 5 minutes in the glass.  By the time you got to the bottom of the glass, the wine was completly gone.  Just nothing left, no nose, little taste, no finish.  I have talked to others and they agree that it is rare but does occasionally happen.  This was a 1977 Mouton Cadet, Red Bordeaux, Baron Philippe de Rothschild.  The other two bottles were just fine.  He had brought it back from NYC a few months ago and the wine seller promptly issued him a credit without even seeing the bottle.  Now that's what I call a wine merchant.


Jim

Gretchen's picture

(post #36763, reply #26 of 29)

DS had a special bottle of Silver Oak that he opened for an anniversary celebration. It was corked.  He wrote them and they sent a replacement, no questons asked. They had gotten it at the winery on a trip, I should add.

Gretchen


Edited 12/3/2008 11:41 am ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
BonnieinHolland's picture

(post #36763, reply #28 of 29)

thecooktoo, Mouton Cadet is a modest Bordeaux, not one for long keeping.  So it would seem to me that a 1977 is way too old for this wine.  Unless you meant a Mouton Rothschild, which is a premier cru Grand Cru Classe - a whole other level of wine and one that can be kept.


About the whole issue of how long a wine can be kept...it seems to me that this is also a matter of personal taste as well as the particular wine in question.  Some folks like the way a particular wine tastes after it's sat a bit.  There aren't really any rules.


cheers, Bonnie

thecooktoo's picture

(post #36763, reply #29 of 29)

All I know is that he paid about a hundred and fifty a bottle for it a couple of months before we served it.  The good bottles were wonderful, as was the other one.  It just went absolutly flat in less than 10 minutes after it was in the glass.


Jim

soupereasy's picture

(post #36763, reply #27 of 29)

Good to know!

vjom's picture

(post #36763, reply #7 of 29)

Putting it in the fridge was the best thing you could have done and using a resealing system that creates a vacuum in the bottle while temporarily sealing it (which I hope you used). The cold temp of the fridge almost halts the ageing processes which are sped up at room temp and the vacuum pretty well halts the oxidization process.

annieqst's picture

(post #36763, reply #10 of 29)

JJ: I'm impressed you still have a bottle after a week and a half. Wine doesn't hang around that long in our house. ; )

MadMom's picture

(post #36763, reply #11 of 29)

The rats would get to it before that.  Sometimes I get a full glass and it seems no more than seconds before I'll set it down and the damnable rats have drank the whole thing.   Well, course, that's not my fault, so DH has to pour me another one, because usually by that time, the rats have his, too.  We've never seen any of the little creatures, but I know it must be them; who else could it be?



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Heck's picture

(post #36763, reply #12 of 29)

gremlins.  ;-)

       

  

when you are up to yur knees in gators, make gatorade     

MadMom's picture

(post #36763, reply #13 of 29)

I guess gremlins does sound better, but it has two syllables, and sometimes it's all we can do to say "rats".



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Heck's picture

(post #36763, reply #14 of 29)

I see your point, it's just at my house it's usually the g'lims that get in the wine. :)

       

  

when you are up to yur knees in gators, make gatorade     

annieqst's picture

(post #36763, reply #15 of 29)

Rats? I was wondering what was getting ours. Now I know! ; )

MadMom's picture

(post #36763, reply #16 of 29)

Definitely!  You might not ever catch them at it, but I know they're doing it.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

thecooktoo's picture

(post #36763, reply #17 of 29)

I have not had the problem with wine drinking rats (too far north, I would have to assume), but I do suspect Buddy the bijon of getting into my wine.  I know that I cannot drink it that fast.


We don't have rats but we do have a problem with snakes up here in MD...so we have to take a lot of preventive snake bite medicine.  And it works, we have never seen a snake on our property!


Jim

MadMom's picture

(post #36763, reply #18 of 29)

I've never seen a rat, either, but I know that I don't drink that much wine, so I have to blame it on something.  Wine is also good tiger medicine.  It must work to keep them away because I haven't seen a single tiger on my property here in NC!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

soupereasy's picture

(post #36763, reply #20 of 29)

I learned that about the tiger repellent as well. Also that well known toast, "may this house be free of tigers". Drink plenty of wine and have yet to have any tigers!;)

MadMom's picture

(post #36763, reply #21 of 29)

Amen!  It actually works.  Have not had a single tiger here since we started religiously drinking wine with dinner!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

javajitters's picture

(post #36763, reply #19 of 29)

I don't usually drink wine, but cook with it always.  I'm more of a vodka with an olive person. :-)