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marinading with buttermilk

PCM's picture

I recently tried marinading chicken in buttermilk, with great results!
What results will marinading pork spareribs, or any pork or beef with buttermilk produce?
Thanks to all in advance!
Pete

Gretchen's picture

I think it is pretty specific (post #69126, reply #1 of 10)

I think it is pretty specific to chicken. And don't over marinate--it can make the chicken mushy (like in overnight, which I see in some recipes.).
That said, a lot of Indian recipes use yogurt as a marinade, and then use it in the sauce. Again, it is often chicken--maybe lamb occasionally. NOt sure.

Gretchen
PCM's picture

I will look into yogurt. I (post #69126, reply #3 of 10)

I will look into yogurt.
I presume the tenderizing is due to the cultures added to milk and yogurt.
Thanks!
Pete

thecooktoo's picture

I marinate AND BRINE chicken (post #69126, reply #2 of 10)

I marinate AND BRINE chicken at the same time. I add 1/4 cup of salt to 2 cups of buttermilk and marinate/brine for 2-4 hours.
Remove from the brine, let it just drain off while you hold it for a few seconds, then into seasoned flour, then pan fry. Wonderful fried chicken.

Jim

PCM's picture

I'll try the (post #69126, reply #4 of 10)

I'll try the brine.
Thanks!
Pete

Gretchen's picture

And just so you know, I am (post #69126, reply #5 of 10)

And just so you know, I am not a fan of brining at all--going against the tide usually because so many do. I think it makes the meat mushy, and it definitely will if you leave it too long.
I don't think it is necessarily the "cultures" because most buttermilk isn't cultured any more. It is more likely the lactic acid.

Gretchen
StevenHB's picture

Over-brining can be a (post #69126, reply #6 of 10)

Over-brining can be a problem. I once turned some lovely boneless chicken breast into spongy lunch meat by overbrining it.

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Fledge's picture

I have never liked buttermilk (post #69126, reply #9 of 10)

I have never liked buttermilk taste with fried chicken. Didn't grow up eating it that way, seaux....got me one of those deep fat fryers and haven't tried chicken yet. After a long while, I was finally able to fry a whole chicken that I did brine and it was great. (In a cast iron pot though). I am curious how the vat will work.

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

Chef Todd Mohr's picture

The buttermilk works because (post #69126, reply #7 of 10)

The buttermilk works because of the acidic qualities.

Acids in marinades break down connective tissues, tenderizing the item slightly, and adding flavor.

You can certainly marinate pork in buttermilk. It's a great way to get extra moisture into the finished dish. When cooked incorrectly, pork can be dry. Marinating first, then breading and pan-frying will give you the best chop ever.

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Gretchen's picture

IF you don't overcook it. (post #69126, reply #8 of 10)

IF you don't overcook it. Overcooking pork would be the number one reason for dry tasteless meat, in my opinion.

Gretchen
Fledge's picture

buttermilk and pork? oh man, (post #69126, reply #10 of 10)

buttermilk and pork? oh man, I dunno...

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey