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Liver and onions

pamilyn's picture

DH and I are going to a restaurunt that has Liver and Onions as a special every Wednesday. It occured to me that I don't think I have ever seen a discussion about Liver and Onions here. Is it just an outdated dish that not too many people make anymore???? Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

ehBeth's picture

(post #33245, reply #1 of 79)

It's on quite a few menus on restaurants here - and it's certainly something I order when it's at one of the good spots (like Allen's on the Danforth). 


I also prepare it at home fairly regularly through the autumn and winter.


 


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Regality's picture

(post #33245, reply #2 of 79)

I do it at home, not as frequently as I once did, but still love it.  I used to have a recipe for lamb liver in red wine sauce from the Galloping Gourmet that was exceptional, but somehow misplaced it.  I always subbed calf's liver for the lamb liver.

 


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Susan-Calgary's picture

(post #33245, reply #3 of 79)

Is this the one?


                     *  Exported from  MasterCook  *


                      Braised Lamb's Liver Henderson


Recipe By     : The Graham Kerr Cookbook pg. 172
Serving Size  : 4    Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    : Lamb


  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
   1      pound         lamb's liver -- finely sliced
   2                    onions -- sliced 1/2" thick
     1/2  cup           clarified butter
     1/2  cup           dry red wine
     1/4  cup           fresh parsley -- chopped
   1                    bay leaf
   1      sprig         thyme
     1/2  cup           flour
   1      teaspoon      salt
                        ground black peppercorns -- to season
   1      clove         garlic -- crushed
     1/2  cup           water


Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
Coat liver with flour.
Brown onion in clarified butter in casserole with crushed garlic. 
Dot with butter, add wine, parsley, bay leaf, thyme, salt, pepper, and water.  Cover and bake at 350 degrees F. in oven for 30 minutes.
Shallow fry floured liver slices quickly - to color only - lay them on top, cover, and bake 10 minutes at same heat, basting two or three times with red wine mixture.
Remove cover, bake further 5 minutes, then serve.


                   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -



 

Regality's picture

(post #33245, reply #27 of 79)

Oh, yes, yes, yes, that's IT!  Thank you so much.  *hugging you* The only MadMomming I do is to fry up some bacon and then use the drippings to fry the onions and liver in.  I've put this on the menu for next week when my SO is out, because it's not exactly on his low purine, anti-kidney stone diet.  *L* 

 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


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Susan-Calgary's picture

(post #33245, reply #30 of 79)

I'm so glad I could help Regality.  Enjoy.

samchang's picture

(post #33245, reply #4 of 79)

It occured to me that I don't think I have ever seen a discussion about Liver and Onions here. Is it just an outdated dish that not too many people make anymore????


I think it's because people view liver like they do kidneys: they have a hard time dealing with consuming the filter of bodily fluids. Me, I like my liver processed in pates and the like. To me, the texture is off-putting when its served as is. And that liver sashimi? Don't even go there!

MadMom's picture

(post #33245, reply #6 of 79)

I'm with you...although I don't even like organs in pate.  Liver was one of the few things my mother wouldn't eat (I didn't get my pickiness from her), even though she said so many people loved it.  When she was in her final illness and we had caregivers looking after her, I did all of her grocery shopping, and one day, the caregiver put liver on the list.  I explained that mother did not like liver.  "She'll like mine," was the reply.  I cautioned her to never call it liver, but simply to refer to it as baked steak.  She did, and Mom ate it once or twice a week until she passed away.  Guess it's all in the mind, right?



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Susan-Calgary's picture

(post #33245, reply #5 of 79)

Too too many years ago my DH joked that he wanted to have the promise  I would make liver, bacon and onions at least once a week put in our marriage vows - and I haven't made it in quite a while, but if I ever want to really make him happy, that's what I still feed him.  We both love it.

Adele's picture

(post #33245, reply #7 of 79)

I bought calves liver just last week.  I cut it into strips, dip in flour & rosemary & lightly saute.  I do this without touching it.  LOL

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Marcia's picture

(post #33245, reply #26 of 79)

I don't touch raw liver to cook or to eat. My parents used to have calves' liver with bacon and onions, but it's something that actually makes me gag.


DH would eat it, but it's no great loss to him. I do make liver pate with chicken livers, and I don't enjoy doing it, but I use lots of butter and brandy (I know you can't have this part), which makes things better somehow.

Fledge's picture

(post #33245, reply #43 of 79)

oops, here is where the sisterhood part separates.


Smothered Liver and Onions with gravy and grits.


YUM. 


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Marcia's picture

(post #33245, reply #44 of 79)

God, what a terrible thing to do with grits. I'm ashamed. LOL

Fledge's picture

(post #33245, reply #45 of 79)

hee-hee


"Let it be, let be....whisper words of wisdom, let it be."


The Beatles

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

wonka's picture

(post #33245, reply #8 of 79)

I'm one of those people who do not like liver. I don't like the smell, the taste and I especially dislike the texture. I've only eaten it 3 times in my life and all 3 times I vomitted violently afterwards. I'm pretty sure I'd know if someone tried to give it to me on the sly.

butterscotch's picture

(post #33245, reply #9 of 79)

I was raised on it and love it. If I weren't concerned about its high cholesterol content and other unhealthful properties, I'd cook it all the time. As things are, I make it about once a month. DH was also raised on it and likes it, thank goodness. But sometimes I feel that we're the only people left in the world who do like it. Most people I know just make faces and gagging noises whenever it's mentioned. DD, who grew up seeing us eat it, won't touch it.

assibams's picture

(post #33245, reply #10 of 79)

I like to eat calf's liver, but truly hate handling it. DH loves venison and wild boar's liver.


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"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
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Li's picture

(post #33245, reply #13 of 79)

I love venison liver, too. I always remind DH to keep it for me, and he always forgets, or drops it in the field.

Do you have a favorite recipe? Now I'm craving it.

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ehBeth's picture

(post #33245, reply #14 of 79)

http://www.chefkoch.de/rezepte/229801094393286/Kalbsleber-Berliner-Art.html


now if I could translate this better than google can ...


Preparation

 The liver skins, wässern as well as the veins cut out. From the liver 20 disks à 80g cut. The apple disks in lemon water put. The bulbs in Julienne cut. The bulb disks mehlieren and knusprig brown frittieren. Then to drip off leave.
And anschwitzen apple disks heat butter up in a pan from both sides. With sugar to cover and easily karamellisieren leave. In another pan and anbraten the easily mehlierten calf liver disks heat the butter fat up from both sides well and pink refine. The liver arrange and with roasting butter nappieren. And with the frittierten bulbs kidneys put an apple disk on the liver.
As supplement Kartoffelpüree is served, to prescription sees CK, Rezeptsuche´´


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samchang's picture

(post #33245, reply #16 of 79)

Das war ausgezeichnet und very funny.

assibams's picture

(post #33245, reply #21 of 79)

*G* Funny, and I could understand every single word of it ;-)


Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

pamilyn's picture

(post #33245, reply #19 of 79)

Does it taste alot different than beef liver? Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Li's picture

(post #33245, reply #41 of 79)

Not much different. I've never done a side-by-side comparison.

Central Scrutinizer

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assibams's picture

(post #33245, reply #20 of 79)

We are lucky that our providing hunter's wife is sick of liver and kidneys of whatever he drags home *g*. Since Bernie likes simple best I normally prepare all livers the same: slice thinly. While prepping the liver I sautee some sliced onions, well, a lot actually (DH loves them) in either butter or ghee. When the onions are nice and golden, some crispy, yumm, I remove them from the pan, add the liver, sautee it until done. I season with salt&pepper, and some thyme or marjoram (prefer marjoram with liver). If I want sauce, I add a splash of heavy cream, then serve with the onions.


Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Li's picture

(post #33245, reply #40 of 79)

Sounds perfect! Thank you.

Central Scrutinizer

Only connect.

APonKP's picture

(post #33245, reply #23 of 79)

I saute calves liver that has been lightly dusted with seasoned flour, remove when still pink, saute shallots in pan, deglaze with a good sherry vinegar, pour over and top with chopped fresh tender herbs like parsley, tarragon, chives. I would think that would be good for venison liver as well. If those cute little boys learn to like well prepared liver early they will always. Of course, it is nice to have organic because of liver's function.

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne
butterscotch's picture

(post #33245, reply #15 of 79)

I can understand and relate to that, although to me it is much less off-putting than a raw chicken or certain types of fish.

Wolvie's picture

(post #33245, reply #11 of 79)

I make it once or twice a year - very rich dish, so a time or two takes care of the craving. I'd really have to trust a restaurant to get it right to order it. Usually it is terribly overcooked. (In my experience anyway)

 


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Gretchen's picture

(post #33245, reply #12 of 79)

My mother made it perfectly. And I like it but don't ever think about making it. Had a really good plat  in Paris however.

Gretchen

Gretchen
pamilyn's picture

(post #33245, reply #18 of 79)

Wolvie, I read somewhere around here that you have a very yummy pate recipe. Care to share? Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Wolvie's picture

(post #33245, reply #24 of 79)

are you talking about this one?


http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cookstalk/messages?msg=20634.131


the original recipe in my post is my stand by. I do like the WS duck liver recipe - and you can combine the 2, it did work out well, as odd as it sounds. Thanks for reminding me of it - I'll be making some for a TG day starter(along with other things, of course)


 


I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts. - Will Rogers