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irloin tips

TrishE's picture

After several failed attempts at finding "sirloin tips" for Fine Cookings wonderful Spicy Beef Thai Curry recipe I would like to know what alternative cut can be used? Or perhaps what name for that cut might be used in my part of the country. I live in south-eastern Virginia.

Gretchen's picture

(post #35940, reply #1 of 22)

It is just the sirloin cut into "tips".  There is a cut of meat called "sirloin tip" (which I think comes from the top round) which can be a roast, or it can be cut into chunks for "tips". This is a less tender cut than a "sirloin" as in a sirloin steak. I haven't looked at the recipe but if it is cooked fast, you might want to get a piece of boneless sirloin steak and cut it into the chunks needed.

Gretchen

 

Looked at the recipe. Get a piece of boneless sirloin for best results.


Edited 5/15/2008 8:08 am ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
MEANCHEF's picture

(post #35940, reply #2 of 22)

Use boneless top sirloin.

bkt's picture

(post #35940, reply #3 of 22)

Mean Chef!! You are so very, very good! and I love your comments.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #35940, reply #4 of 22)

What's not to love?

bkt's picture

(post #35940, reply #7 of 22)

What? The comments or you?? Either one. Don't worry -- this old gal is old enough to be your Granny!!

MadMom's picture

(post #35940, reply #12 of 22)

Doubt if you're old enough to be Mean's granny.  He's just a year younger than I am, and my Granny would be 120 if she were still around!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

bkt's picture

(post #35940, reply #20 of 22)

Your Granny started late! ;=)

MadMom's picture

(post #35940, reply #22 of 22)

No - I'm just old, LOL!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

butterscotch's picture

(post #35940, reply #5 of 22)

A couple of weeks ago at Costco I encountered something labeled "beef loin flap meat."  Although it looked good and was well priced, I didn't buy any because I had no idea what it was.  Just this morning I was looking at a back issue of FC that had a recipe for sirloin tips and mushrooms braised in beer.  The recipe mentioned that "beef loin flap meat" is another name for "sirloin tip."  So perhaps ask your butcher or market whether they carry "beef loin flap meat" or see if you can find some at your local Costco.  I really sympathize with your problem.  I've been seeing, and passing on, recipes for sirloin tip for years now because I just couldn't find any. Suddenly, I see "sirloin tip" or "beef loin flap meat" on sale at all my usual markets.  Now if I could just find "hangar steak".

Gretchen's picture

(post #35940, reply #6 of 22)

"Sirloin tips" are cut up pieces of beef, in my part of the country, forever.
In that recipe, it is top sirloin, boneless. 
"Flap meat", if you can find it (and if you can't find "tips", well) is certainly OK, but a lot more esoteric than is needed for this recipe.

Gretchen

Gretchen
butterscotch's picture

(post #35940, reply #11 of 22)

Thanks for sharing, Gretchen.  I've always wanted to take a class about cuts of meat, what part of the cow they come from, which ones can be substituted for other ones, etc. I need remedial help in this area.

TrishE's picture

(post #35940, reply #8 of 22)

Thanks for the help! Will check out the "flap" meat the next time I am in COSTCO. Don't you just love the names!

Marcia's picture

(post #35940, reply #9 of 22)

It seems to me that they used to call it something other than flap meat, but whatever it's called, it's excellent, and you're sure to be pleased.

butterscotch's picture

(post #35940, reply #10 of 22)

I really would like to know who the marketing genius was who devised the name "beef loin flap meat" for this innocuous-looking cut.  "BLFM" sounds like something that belongs in pet food.

gourmand's picture

(post #35940, reply #13 of 22)

The reason you can't find hangar steak is because it is tough and usually ground into hamburger. Skirt or flank would be a better choice.

 Growing old is inevitable, Growing up is optional.

 Growing old is inevitable, Growing up is optional.

butterscotch's picture

(post #35940, reply #16 of 22)

I'll take your word about the hangar steaks. And skirt or flank is what I always make when the recipe calls for a chewy but flavorful piece of meat.  It would be nice to be able to cook and taste a hangar steak just once, though, to satisfy my curiosity.

Gretchen's picture

(post #35940, reply #17 of 22)

They are very popular in "bistro" cooking--we have a cute/good restaurant here (Lulu's festers) that serves them and they are on menus in France.  It is also sometimes called "butcher steak" because the butcher knew how good they are and would take them home for the family.
I personally think that skirt steak has more flavor and tenderness. I NEVER buy flank steak since it costs more than ribeye, and is just too tough/striatedly stringy. Long ago it was cheap and nice for a stuffed steak braise, but no more.

Gretchen

Gretchen
laserbeam's picture

(post #35940, reply #18 of 22)

Don't agree with you on the hanger steak.  The reason it's hard to find is that there is only one per animal and the butcher saves it for himself.  I frequently order it when I see it on a menu, usually at a French-style bistro where it may be listed by its French name, "onglet."  Cooked to no more than medium rare and sliced on the bias, it's tender and has delicious beefy flavor.   Check this out for more info:


http://www.lobels.com/store/main/item.asp?item=25  

Gretchen's picture

(post #35940, reply #19 of 22)

I could swear I hear an echo. Helllloooooo out there!!  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
FL.Cook's picture

(post #35940, reply #21 of 22)

I heard that hanger steak was always taken home by the butcher because it was so good, and there is only one to a cow!!!!  That is why you never find them.  I have had them and it was very tender.

Carole
gourmand's picture

(post #35940, reply #14 of 22)

There are two parts of the sirloin, top sirloin (excellent sirloin steak) and sirloin tip (much tougher steaks and roasts). The short loin has the strip, t-bone and tenderloin steaks. Like Gretchen said use good sirloin. Cut across the grain.

 Growing old is inevitable, Growing up is optional.

 Growing old is inevitable, Growing up is optional.

Gretchen's picture

(post #35940, reply #15 of 22)

But if you use top sirloin there is no need to cut across the grain. If you have sirloin tip (the tougher cut) then you do.  I roast a whole top sirloin for family dinners and it carves just like prime rib--no need to cut across the grain there either.

Gretchen

Gretchen