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DeannaS's picture

Injera (post #30793)

I made doro wat and injera this week. I'm still trying to perfect both (which is hard, since doro wat is really high fat so I don't make it often).

Anyway, has anyone attempted injera? Mine is passable, at best. It's not thick enough or fluffy enough or sour enough. I even cheated this time by adding a wee bit of my sourdough starter. I haven't gotten the gumption up yet to let it sit out for 3 days - but that's going to be my next attemp.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

MadMom's picture

(post #30793, reply #1 of 30)

You're way beyond me on both...can you post recipes, since I have no ideas what either is?



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DeannaS's picture

(post #30793, reply #2 of 30)

Sure. There's a bunch of recipes out there for doro wot, and I change mine up each time. But, here's the gist of it:

Doro wat (Ethiopian Chicken Stew)
3 onions
1 stick butter
3-5 T berbere (Ethiopian spice mix: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/104015)
4 cloves garlic
1 inch chunk of ginger, grated
1 small can tomato paste
1/2 cup red wine
4 chicken breasts (skin removed and marinated in water and the juice of 1 lemon for 20-30 minutes - removed from marinade and slits poked in flesh for sauce to penetrate)
carrots (optional and not traditional)
hard-boiled eggs (one per person, optional and traditional)

In a large pot, sweat the onions until nearly caramelized. Add butter and cook for a few more minutes until butter if fully melted. Add the rest of the ingredients (except eggs if you're using those), and enough water to make it saucy. (I used the marinade water - maybe a cup and a half?) Cook for about 20 minutes. Add eggs and cook until chicken (and carrots if using) are done. The butter should "break" and float on top.

The carrots are something that our local Ethiopian restaurant does. So, we add them. We don't use the eggs. This was the first time I used that much paste. I usually use about half that amount, and I like it better with less. I also used the wine for the first time, but prefer it without. You can also add additional hot pepper of some sort, if you like things hotter. The amount of spice mix is pretty variable, too - depending on taste. I think this was less garlic than I used last time, too.

Some recipes I've seen use as much as 1 pound of butter. But, I just can't do it. I think the most I've used is a half-pound. It was definitely good that way, but total heart attack on a plate.

I serve this with a dollop of sour cream. I don't know if that's traditional or not - but it's the way our restaurant does it, so I follow suit (and it's good that way).

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

DeannaS's picture

(post #30793, reply #3 of 30)

Injera (the way I did it this time).
(Note, this recipe didn't include a sitting time. I let mine sit for a few hours, and added maybe an ounce of sourdough starter.)

• 1/4 cup teff flour
• 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
• 1 cup water
• a pinch of salt
• peanut or vegetable oil

• a mixing bowl
• a nonstick pan or cast-iron skillet

1. Put the teff flour in the bottom of a mixing bowl, and sift in the all-purpose flour.

Tip
Many Ethiopians in America use square-shaped, electric, nonstick pans. These heat evenly and make it easy to remove the injera once it is cooked.

2. Slowly add the water, stirring to avoid lumps.

3. Stir in the salt.

4. Heat a nonstick pan or lightly oiled cast-iron skillet until a water drop dances on the surface. Make sure the surface of the pan is smooth: Otherwise, your injera might fall apart when you try to remove it.

5. Coat the pan with a thin layer of batter. Injera should be thicker than a crêpe, but not as thick as a traditional pancake. It will rise slightly when it heats.

6. Cook until holes appear on the surface of the bread. Once the surface is dry, remove the bread from the pan and let it cool.

Edited cause I meant to add the link where I got this one:
http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/bread/recipe-injera.html


Edited 4/22/2005 10:53 am ET by Deanna

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

MadMom's picture

(post #30793, reply #4 of 30)

Sounds good...and I have all the ingredients for the Ethiopian spice.  Couple of questions...I noted your comment that the butter should break and float to the top...is it served that way?  Also, on the Injera, what is teff flour?  I realize I could google, but figure you know.  Is the Injera similar to a naan?  Could you use some sort of sponge, biga, or other starter if you don't have a sourdough starter?  I'm tempted, although after my one experience with Ethiopian food in Adams-Morgan, I swore I'd never eat it again.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

DeannaS's picture

(post #30793, reply #5 of 30)

Yep. It's said that Ethiopians aren't happy unless the butter is swimming on top. Me, I stir it back in before ladeling it out.

The injera is more like a pancake. It's cooked just on one side.

Teff is a grain native to Ethiopia. I got a bag of Bob's red mill teff grain and ground it into flour in the mortar and pestle (because my spice grinder broke). It's a lot of work, and I highly recommend getting the flour if you can find it. I'd guess that you'll be able to find it, judging by the shopping options you've mentioned before.

Another recipe that I've seen (and that I'm going to try next) is just teff flour and water, left to sit for 3 days or until it bubbles and smells sour.

Oh, and we use the spice mix in other stuff, too. It's really tasty.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

elizaram's picture

(post #30793, reply #6 of 30)

Wow, thanks for the recipe - I was just thinking about posting here asking for an injera recipe that uses teff. I've been using the Moosewood recipe, which substitutes wheat flour assuming that teff is generally unavailable, but I just discovered that Woodman's (of all places) carries it. Same brand you mentioned - I didn't realize it was whole grains rather than flour, I'll have to figure out what to do about that. (Would whizzing it in the food processor work?) I'd be interested in seeing your other recipe, the one that involved fermentation.


Anyway, here's the recipe, and yes it's one of those 3 day ones.


Injera (Ethiopian Flat Bread)
(Sundays at Moosewood Restaurant, p. 525)


1 3/4 cup unbleached white flour
1/2 cup self-rising flour
1/4 cup whole wheat bread flour
1 package dry yeast (about 1 tablespoon)
2 1/2 cups warm water


To finish:
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt


Combine the flours and yeast in a ceramic or glass bowl. Add the warm water and mix into a fairly thin, smooth batter. Let the mixture sit for three full days at room temperature. Stir the mixture once a day. It will bubble and rise.


When you are ready to make the injera, add the baking soda and salt and let the batter sit for 10 to 15 minutes


Heat a small, nonstick 9-inch skillet. When a drop of water bounces on the pan's surface, take about 1/3 cup of the batter and pour it in the skillet quickly, all at once. Swirl the pan so that the entire bottom is evenly coated, then return to the heat.


The injera is cooked on only one side and the bottom should not brown. When the moisture has evaporated and lots of "eyes" appear on the surface, remove the injera. Let each injera cool and then stack them as you go along.


If the first injera is undercooked, try using less of the mixture, perhaps 1/4 cup, and maybe cook it just a bit longer. Be sure not to overcook it. Injera should be soft and pliable so that it can be rolled or folded, like a crepe.


-----


I've had pretty good luck with this recipe, having made it many times over the last few years. I've left it on the counter for 3 days and we all lived to tell about it, LOL! (Have even left if for four days when something came up on day three that prevented me making dinner.) The first couple of days it looks like an absolute mess - it separates into a greyish liquid and a stringy mass of gluten, and no amount of stirring will homogenize it. But on day three, it magically breaks down into a nice smooth pancake-batter texture. Pretty easy to cook as well, but a nonstick pan is essential, and like waffles, the first one in the pan might end up as a sacrifice to the kitchen gods.


The same cookbook has recipes for Yemiser W'et and Yetakelt W'et (lentil and vegetable stew, respectively), which like Dorowat go very well with the injera. I'd be glad to post them if any are interested. (And only half a stick of butter each! :-p )


Which Ethiopian restaurant were you referencing? I've enjoyed meals at Buraka (lacking in atmosphere, but tasty and cheap!) Haven't been to Yirgalem yet - hubby's been trying to take me there for my birthday, but the babysitter keeps canceling on us. I've heard that they've tried to "healthify" the recipes, though, and that some just aren't as tasty as a result.



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

DeannaS's picture

(post #30793, reply #7 of 30)

Cool, another recipe to try.

Um, the other recipe is:
3/4 teff flour
3 1/2 cups water

Let sit for 3 days. Make like crepes.

This recipe includes a tip that if you can only get teff grains, that you should put the teff and water in the blender and whiz. Well, I did that, and I don't think it worked. But, it is dutifully sitting on the counter. Today is day 3. I figured it was better to let it sit there and ferment than for me to throw it out at the beginning. But, I'll probably end up tossing it.

I got my teff at Woodman's, too. It's a recent addition, for sure. I had looked at the coop at one time, but no luck.

I also tried a millet flour recipe, as that's supposed to be as close as you can get to teff without being teff. The flavor of the teff-spiked stuff I made Wednesday was way better than the millet flavor, though (even if the texture wasn't quite right).

I'm referring to Buraka. I haven't been to Yirgalem yet, either. Also babysitter issues for us. Hm...maybe we should swap babysitting so we can each go. ;)

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

elizaram's picture

(post #30793, reply #8 of 30)

Hmm, you'll have to report on how that turns out. The recipe looks a little scary, actually - with no yeast or sourdough starter, seems you'd be relying on whatever native flora you have in your kitchen, which could be a good or bad thing! I'll give it a try next time I stop by Woodman's, but if it smells like skunk on day three, it's time for Plan B.


I've seen a lot of recipes that have no fermentation time, and rely on club soda and baking powder for the texture. The result is edible, but nowhere near as good as the one I posted.


We take DS to a lot of restaurants - having been out and about regularly since he was an infant, he's pretty well-behaved in them, though we seldom go anywhere too fancy. He's eaten his way up and down State Street and has a rather educated palate for a 3 year old, but I think Ethiopian food would still be too much for him! On the rare occasions that DH and I get out by ourselves, we try to pick a spot that we wouldn't be able to go with the kid. We should definitely discuss this swap idea further. ;-)



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

DeannaS's picture

(post #30793, reply #9 of 30)

Yah, I'm a bit skeptical, too. I'll definitely have to try the Moosewood version and compare.

Our son loves Maharaja (Indian) - though lately he's turned into a picky eater (please let it be a phase). He also loves noodles with Thai green curry. But, when I made the doro wat, I also made a green bean and potato side dish, and I took out part of that before I added the spices and turned it into cheesy soup for him. He doesn't do chicken at all - well, pretty much any meat is snubbed. So, a lot of things are out.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

MadMom's picture

(post #30793, reply #11 of 30)

Got a question.  My one experience with Ethiopian food came from being seated around a huge round table and being served this giant pancake with little blobs of what appeared to be regurgitated food around the edges.  We used more pancakes to grab some of the barf and eat it.  Were those pancakes Injera?  (Now that I've gotten more used to Thai, Indian, and Moroccan quisine, I'm wondering if I would like the Ethiopian stuff any better?  Hmmmm.)



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

wop's picture

(post #30793, reply #12 of 30)

   Yes that is injera.   The barf could describe any number of dishes that are good but yes do look like something a cat puked.


   We're more used to Eritrean, but basically it's the same cooking with different names. Both were once Italian colonies so we have lots of immigrants from both.


                                     Philip


    My brother in law called it eating sponge off of a trash can lid . Philistines.

MadMom's picture

(post #30793, reply #13 of 30)

Perhaps your brother-in-law and I would get along!  I just couldn't get around the mental picture of about a dozen Ethiopians standing around this huge pancake and poking their fingers down their throats as a way of preparing dinner. 



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

dixie1's picture

(post #30793, reply #15 of 30)

Gives a whole new meaning to "plating" doesn't it? I was just about ready to eat breakfast, but maybe I'll wait a while. ;)

DeannaS's picture

(post #30793, reply #16 of 30)

Yep, that pancake is injera. And the blobs were probaby "wot/wat" of some sort. Wot/wat/wet (I've seen all these spellings) just means "stew." There are a bunch of kinds. I think you should give it another try. As much as you like Indian, I think you'd like it. It's spicy in a different way, but the intensity of flavor is much like Indian.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

KathiM's picture

(post #30793, reply #21 of 30)

Barf? How appetizing.  Yes the bread in the middle in injera.

MadMom's picture

(post #30793, reply #23 of 30)

Okay, finally remembered to check at Central Market for teff flour, and sure enough, they had it, so I bought a bag.  Let me ask once again...I'm getting the impression that you just mix the teff flour, regular flour, and water, and hope for the best?  No leavening?  Would it be better to mix it and let it set for a few days on the counter top to see what happens?  Would it be cheating to throw a small bit of yeast in, or to make a starter out of the teff flour?  I'm definitely going to try this, but need guidance from those in the know.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

DeannaS's picture

(post #30793, reply #24 of 30)

I think you could easily make a starter with some teff flour. From what I hear, that's not really cheating, and it'd be much cheaper to start with a small amount of teff flour and feed it daily (like with a wheat flour starter) and see what you get. I hate it when I end up wasting a large chunk of ingredients.

If you do it, let me know. I've only found teff grains so far, and until I get around to buying another coffee grinder, I don't think I'll be trying it again. (Blender did not work - threw that batch out.)

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

MadMom's picture

(post #30793, reply #25 of 30)

I think the bag I bought has about 4 - 6 cups of teff flour...if you want me to send you some, I'll be happy to.  Just email me with your snail mail address.  Cannot imagine ever using it all!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

DeannaS's picture

(post #30793, reply #29 of 30)

Thanks for the sweet offer. I've been bugging DH for a new coffee/spice grinder for a while, though. And, this may be the impetus we need (especially since he was the one stuck hand-grinding the 1/4 cup I needed for the last recipe).

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

Sackville's picture

(post #30793, reply #30 of 30)

Don't shoot me but I do have a recipe for injeera that was adapted for American kitchens and uses pancake mix. I know it's not authentic but it might be an easy way out.... just yell if you want it.

**Ducking** ;-)

KathiM's picture

(post #30793, reply #26 of 30)

Hi mom-  I'm not ignoring you but I havent worked with Teff before.  It must be my twin.  I hope she sees the message and answers. :-)

MadMom's picture

(post #30793, reply #27 of 30)

No problem...I just pulled a post at random to reply to, and yours mentioned that the big pancake with the barf all around it was injera, so I figured you knew whereof you spoke!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

KathiM's picture

(post #30793, reply #28 of 30)

I eat the barf but I havent manufactured the injera, just had it in a restaurant.  In my opinion it was too vinegary, but the chicken and lentil and vege stuff was very good.

sandermom's picture

(post #30793, reply #14 of 30)

I did an Ethiopian lunch for 75 a couple of weeks ago.  I have my recipes at work.  Got most from zaar...a very good couscous salad thing.  The injera were a hoot though at the time I was a bit frazzled.  A very late night.  The recipe I used was a three day but a mix of white and whole wheat...teff wasn't to be found.  The last step was to add baking soda.  I had done the  three days in a huge cambro cube thing and thought I was being clever to put it all...several gallons...into something smaller.  I underestimated what the fizzing would do to the volume of goo...I do like floor drains.  This was cooking for the masses...a veg, a chicken and a beef with several salads.  I saved some of the injera and have it as starter; it's on its second batch and doing quite bubblingly.

Klaatu Barada Nikto

DeannaS's picture

(post #30793, reply #17 of 30)

Hm.... Keeping some and using it as the starter for the next batch is a good idea. I can just picture the overflow. I'll take recipes, if you want to post.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

sandermom's picture

(post #30793, reply #19 of 30)

these were the zaar recipes:  #11239  Injera
                                                #39197 Spicy African Stew...this one is veg and got rave reviews.  I'd do it in a crock pot at home.  For my shin dig I set it up in 6"deep third steam table pans and warmed it (next day) in a steam oven just to hot (160F) to keep from overcooking the veggies.
                                                 #38826  Ethiopian Cheese Dip...I used dry curd cottage cheese for the pot cheese. 
                                                  #41308  Ethiopian Dorowat version 2...chicken  good flavor and color.  I used frozen precooked diced chicken from Sysco.  Good place to used leftover chicken or meat from stock making.
                                                   #106194 Eritrean/Ethiopian Beef Stew --Tsebhi Sga or Key Wet...beef    I used a #10can of beef.  For the chili paste I used some red Thai curry paste and white rooster with some smoked tabasco.
                                                    #27017  Ethiopian Tomato Salad  ...needs great tomatoes
                                                    #80789  North African Couscous Salad...really great combination.  I'll be making this one again very soon.
                                                     #African Spiced Vegetable Salad...easy, good dressing, colors held well
                                                      #78025  African Salad...I've always wanted to use hearts of palm; here they are matched with artichoke hearts and the 'shrooms.  It was the right salad to balance the brightness of everything else.


Dessert is not di rigor for Ethiopian menus but epicurious had a restaurant review that said baklava could be included as could fresh fruit so that's what I did too.   


 


 

Klaatu Barada Nikto

DeannaS's picture

(post #30793, reply #22 of 30)

Thanks. I'll be checking these out for sure.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

KathiM's picture

(post #30793, reply #20 of 30)

Try DS @ Ethiopian.  My DD loved it.  Not too spicy- you get to pick up your food with your hands and its fun.

wop's picture

(post #30793, reply #10 of 30)

     We got lessons on making injera about a month ago fron the lady that runs the Eritrean restaurant we go to they don't mix up new batter every time but just continue to add ingredients to the batch daily. As a starter batch aparently the 2 to 3 day sit is the key to getting it right.


    Do you have any idea as to what the spice mix that goes into Zigni is? They tried to explain it to us but didn't know the translations into Italian of some of the spices.


                                                                                                Philip

DeannaS's picture

(post #30793, reply #18 of 30)

Sorry, no. I've not had Zigni. But, I googled it and it looks like it might also use berbere - which I already posted a recipe for. Well, a link to one anyway - it's on epicurious.com. It's the one that I use. I think it's probably much like "curry powder" though, in that there are a million versions. Here's a recipe for Zigni:
http://www.recipezaar.com/31076

(By the way, I don't eat beef, so I'll never try that particular recipe.)

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow