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Identify a plum?

dilly's picture

I'm trying to identify the plums on my plum tree, and could use a lot of help!  They are small, round, dark purple,  extremely juicy, dark flesh, with the pit the size of a cherry pit.  Very sweet and tasty.  Sorry, I don't have a picture.

plantlust's picture

(post #34762, reply #1 of 20)

Billingtons - Dark red skin & flesh
Black Doris - Black skin & dark red flesh
Hawera - Very dark red skin & flesh. A "blood plum".
Sultan - Blood red flesh. Didn't say anything about skin colour.
Above was from a New Zealand website.

I hope you find out what it's called. The best tasting plum I've ever had (besides the Zwetschgen(damson?) in Luxembourg) was a very black plum w/blood red flesh. I never was able to suss out the cultivar name.

PlantLust is going to have a piffy attitude until a decent dentist is found.

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with parsley sauce, goat cheese garlic mashed potatoes, Galena Cellars Niagra grape wine & Pie Boss's apple crumble topped with Ruth & Phil's sour cream/cinnamon ice cream.

dilly's picture

(post #34762, reply #2 of 20)

Thanks Plantlust. Theses are a very dark purple/black dusty skin with dark blood colored flesh.  Doesn't sound too appealing, does it?  I just made a Plum Clafouti (found it on the net) and it's the worst thing I've ever seen, tasted or made!  It's in the garbage with the forcaccia bread I made on Friday.  Black to the drawing board! 

plantlust's picture

(post #34762, reply #3 of 20)

I love clafoutis & it should have been wonderful w/your plums. Hmmm, maybe the recipe was faulty?

What about a plum galette?!? I vaguely remember a recipe in an older issue of FineCooking. A galette would really make your plums shine.

PlantLust is going to have a piffy attitude until a decent dentist is found.

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with parsley sauce, goat cheese garlic mashed potatoes, Galena Cellars Niagra grape wine & Pie Boss's apple crumble topped with Ruth & Phil's sour cream/cinnamon ice cream.

ashleyd's picture

(post #34762, reply #4 of 20)

A small but important question, have you ever had a clafouti that you have enjoyed? I ask this because I have looked at several recipes, tried a few which looked interesting, and had it as a dessert at several restaurants and have not yet had one which lived up to my expectations. Not quite sure what it is but it always seems a bit dull and, well, greasy.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

dilly's picture

(post #34762, reply #5 of 20)

I have never had a Clafouti before, and doubt I will want one in the future.  The recipe was suspicious to began with.  Halved plums placed cut side down in a buttered and sugared pie pan.  The batter? was mixed in a blender and poured over the plums.  The first thing the damn plums did was float to the top and rearrange themselves.  The whole thing looked like some diseased thing, pocked with bloody plums.  Oh well....

Gretchen's picture

(post #34762, reply #8 of 20)

Oh, don't give up on clafouti!!  I made an absolutely elegant pear one and cherries and peaches are also wonderful.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Gloriana's picture

(post #34762, reply #6 of 20)

Thank you, Thank you, Thank you. Thought I was the only one who doesn't go crazy for Clafouti. <G> Seems to be all over the place of late, and so many people make it so badly. It's been totally uninspired when I've tried it from restaurants, my kitchen, and from other knowledgable cooks. Luv all the ingredients, but can't figure why they don't combine to excite my palate :-(

Marcia's picture

(post #34762, reply #9 of 20)

I don't care for it, either. It's just an eggy pancake with fruit. I'll take the fruit, thank you. :)

gmunger's picture

(post #34762, reply #12 of 20)

But you have to admit, it is fun to say clafouti.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
Gretchen's picture

(post #34762, reply #7 of 20)

They may be what I just made jelly from when I was in Denver. DS's inlaws have a tree. It made a lovely jelly. I would imagine that in a clafouti these (that I had) would require a good bit of sugar--and they might not get done.


Boil some up in water and then strain to make jelly. I didn't add pectin and it jelled very well.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Regality's picture

(post #34762, reply #10 of 20)

A generalization from my experience--plums that are good for eating out of hand, e.g., Santa Rosas, are lousy for cooking with.  Others may have had better experiences with "eaters."  If I have a bumper crop of SAs and can't stand to just toss the extras, I usually resort to making a sort of marmalade with half lemons and half plums. 

 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


http://regality3.livejournal.com/



dilly's picture

(post #34762, reply #11 of 20)

I'm giving up on the plums.  My husband won't eat them and wants to drag the garbage can under the tree and pitch them all.  I talked him into asking if any of his employees would like some.  I hate to see them wasted, although the birds enjoy them, and the rotted ones on the ground are attracting the bees.  Our dog prefers the tomatoes in the garden.  ;-)

Adele's picture

(post #34762, reply #13 of 20)

Dry them out & then you'll have prunes, which you can send to me.  LOL


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

courgette's picture

(post #34762, reply #15 of 20)

Plum jam is the best!


Mo

dilly's picture

(post #34762, reply #16 of 20)

Nope... no jam, no pudding, nothing, nada!  I don't eat jam or jelly, or sweets for that matter.  I love savory!  So if we can't give them away, we'll toss them in the garbage.  We planted the tree because it looked so nice and when it blooms in the spring, just looking at it makes me smile.

courgette's picture

(post #34762, reply #17 of 20)

You haven't filled out your profile-how am I to know where to come to get the plums? I assume you are in the States. I am willing toget convicted of smuggling ......


Mo

dilly's picture

(post #34762, reply #18 of 20)

We live where no man would want to come..... Moses Lake Wash.

courgette's picture

(post #34762, reply #19 of 20)

I'd love to come there if I had the time for a fall road trip.


Right now I have to make sure my grade 10 son gets a good start with his homework habits. We have a new mantra. No marks under 80! Don't worry, that's not unrealistic. He's very capable, just lazy.


Mo

dilly's picture

(post #34762, reply #20 of 20)

He should be happy that he has parents that are interested!  Good mantra!

designercook's picture

(post #34762, reply #14 of 20)

I'm putting in a guess at it being a TOKA plum.

Most horticultural suggestions say it's an insignificant plum mainly used for pollinating other plums, but it's the one I wait for all year here in Minnesota. They're incredibly sweet and will perfume the entire kitchen or house while ripening. I buy a crate every year from a local grower and give them as gifts usually about the second week in August. A friend from Philadelphia says she grew up knowing them as "sugar plums".