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Ideas for muskmelon anyone?

Jean's picture

I have this wonderfully sweet melon that I want to serve to company for dessert. Any ideas other than wrapping in prosciutto or filling with vanilla ice cream. I want it to star, it's the very best one I've ever tasted--no lie.


What was the best thing before sliced bread?



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Canuck's picture

(post #37458, reply #1 of 52)

Any tips on how to find a melon like that or was it just luck? It's so rare to find one.

Jean's picture

(post #37458, reply #2 of 52)

Just lucky. DH picked it out for me--and he doesn't even like melon! I'm told that the stem end should be slightly soft, it should smell 'ripe' and that the seeds should sound loose when you shake it.


What was the best thing before sliced bread?



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Canuck's picture

(post #37458, reply #3 of 52)

Aha. I do always smell them, but the stem end tip and the loose seeds are good to know about. I like melon but I usually pick one that's either unripe or over the top (and smells like garbage according to the kids). I will follow your advice.


 

Gretchen's picture

(post #37458, reply #5 of 52)

Aroma when bought, firm all around, and let sit on the counter for several days.


I have a beautiful one just ready now also.  ;o)


Gretchen
Gretchen
Gretchen's picture

(post #37458, reply #8 of 52)

Yes.   I know. We go through this EVERY summer/growing season, and I just can't help it.  Maybe not "sweeter" but "juicier" and giving the sensation of "better" in my world.


I get more satisfaction from fruit that I allow to "ripen" "sweeten" or whatever you call it. We cannot buy melons off the vine except in midsummer and then depending on the rainfall, they may not even be as good as my mid-winter "imports". I can get melons and allow them to sit on thecounter and have them be better fit to eat than the few days before. Do as you want or can in buying your fruit, and I will for mine.  A bit out of sorts about this yearly exercise.


Gretchen


Edited 5/13/2009 1:13 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
sanderson's picture

(post #37458, reply #4 of 52)

What are you serving for dinner? Maybe there's a flavor or texture to have on the side of the melon as in a tasty bit o' cheese or a toasted walnut or a coconut crisp or a dollop of lime cream fresh... A drizzle of ouzo or rakki over perfect melon and allowed to macerate is quite fine and to my taste doesn't mess up a great melon. But then I like licorice.

Jean's picture

(post #37458, reply #7 of 52)

Dinner will be venison roast, veggies with a cheese sauce, rice and salad.  No ouzo or rakki in the house, but the coconut crisp idea appeals. Do you have a favorite recipe to share? Thx.


 



What was the best thing before sliced bread?



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
msm-s's picture

(post #37458, reply #9 of 52)

Make a sorbet, or blend it up with vodka and lime.

roz's picture

(post #37458, reply #10 of 52)

<<<I want it to star, it's the very best one I've ever tasted--no lie.>>> If it's a star, why not let it shine just as it is? Cut it into thin slices or use that melon baller gadget. Let the juice dribble down your chin!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
TracyK's picture

(post #37458, reply #12 of 52)

I'm with roz on this one. Just serve it, sliced, with lime wedges and a little dish of sea salt for people to apply the barest sprinkle if desired.



"One of the great strengths of the United States is … we do not consider ourselves a Christian nation or a Jewish nation or a Muslim nation. We consider ourselves a nation of citizens who are bound by ideals and a set of values."

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Jean's picture

(post #37458, reply #14 of 52)

That would work too. Himself will surely want some ice cream though, without the melon. I can't imagine why he doesn't love it!


Sometimes I wonder--why is that Frisbee getting bigger?--and then it hits me.



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Gretchen's picture

(post #37458, reply #11 of 52)

Long years ago when we were first married I made a dessert very similar to this one of Giada's. I must have seen it somewhere at that time--maybe the NYT. It is really simple and delicious.   I didn't do the basil, but it sounds really nice.



Ingredients

  • 2 cups light red wine, preferably Pinot Noir
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 cantaloupe, halved and seeds removed
  • 1/2 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon chopped basil leaves

Directions

Warm wine in a shallow saucepan over low heat; it should be steaming but not simmering. Dissolve sugar in wine; remove from heat. Pour into medium glass bowl and allow to completely cool. Using a melon baller, scoop out balls of cantaloupe and add to the wine mixture. Thinly slice the outer peel from half a lemon into 4 strips; add to bowl. Add chopped basil. Stir gently. Cover and refrigerate at least 30 minutes. Divide between 4 wine glasses and serve chilled.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Jean's picture

(post #37458, reply #13 of 52)

Ooo that does sound good! thx.


Sometimes I wonder--why is that Frisbee getting bigger?--and then it hits me.



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #37458, reply #15 of 52)

Will the canteloupe with red wine syrup work for you?  I posted one some time back...

Cantaloupe with Red Wine Syrup


by Lauren Chattman


Be the first to rate this Recipe


This recipe, excerpted from the cookbook Dessert Express, is a simple way to dress up cantaloupe for a dinner party-worthy dessert. Chilling the bowls in the freezer makes the dessert even more refreshing as you enjoy it on a warm summer night.Serves four.


 


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


1 cup dry red wine


2 Tbs. granulated sugar


2 ripe cantaloupes


4 large fresh basil leaves


 


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Put 4 dessert bowls in the freezer to chill.


Combine the wine and sugar in a small, heavy saucepan and bring to a boil. Cook at a lively simmer until the wine is reduced to about 1/4 cup, about 10 minutes. Set the saucepan in a bowl of ice water to cool, about 15 minutes.


While the syrup is cooling, cut the cantaloupes in half and remove the seeds. Use a melon baller to scoop the flesh from the rind.


When you're ready to serve, divide the melon balls among the 4 chilled dessert bowls. Drizzle the cooled syrup over the melon, garnish with a basil leaf, and serve immediately.





 



Edited 5/13/2009 2:18 pm ET by ICDOCEAN1

Jean's picture

(post #37458, reply #16 of 52)

Thanks, that's very similar to the one Gretchen posted. Yum.


Sometimes I wonder--why is that Frisbee getting bigger?--and then it hits me.



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Gretchen's picture

(post #37458, reply #17 of 52)

Interesting--wonder whose it was "first"--Laurie or Giadia?  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #37458, reply #18 of 52)

Not a clue and I should look before I post...I really like the recipe though and I served a few cheeses as well. 



 


Gretchen's picture

(post #37458, reply #19 of 52)

Oh, I know. Just funny to me.  And as I said, I must have gotten the idea 40 years ago when I first made it. I remember it because it was a perfect dinner (for a young newly wed cook) in our NY apartment--soft shelled crabs, corn, and the melon dessert. Maybe at least one other veggie, since my mother never set a meal on the table that didn't have 3 of 'em.

Gretchen

Gretchen
thecooktoo's picture

(post #37458, reply #20 of 52)

I would not mess with it.  Cut it in chunks, sprinkle lightly with sea salt and serve cold.  Nothing else needed.


Jim

sally ryan's picture

(post #37458, reply #21 of 52)

Sea salt and a splash of fresh lime juice.  Especially good on papaya!

thecooktoo's picture

(post #37458, reply #22 of 52)

Papaya is one fruit that I have never learned to enjoy.  We had them growing in our yard in Puerto Rico, cook fixed them every morning for breakfast and I could just never learn to like them.


Muskmelons (cantelope), however is a totally different issue.  To me that is the only fruit that can be called a melon.   Everything else is a cantelope wannabe.


Jim 

sally ryan's picture

(post #37458, reply #23 of 52)

I know there's no comparison between the two.  Just adding  to the conversation.

Gretchen's picture

(post #37458, reply #24 of 52)

I used to agree with you, and DH still does. But I really love them as a big change from other fruit now. Got one while DD was here and she just about polished off the whole thing alone!!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
Lee's picture

(post #37458, reply #25 of 52)

I'm with you.  I'll eat it if it's put in front of me, but papayas just don't do it for me.  It's one of the few fruits I don't care for.  At the other extreme, I could eat my weight in mangoes. 

Marcia's picture

(post #37458, reply #26 of 52)

Years ago, I overdosed on Costco mangoes, and haven't eaten one willingly since. Mangoes were a novelty at the time, and I won't do that again if it can be avoided.

Gretchen's picture

(post #37458, reply #27 of 52)

Make some chutney!! LOVE it. And LOVE mangoes!  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #37458, reply #28 of 52)

Not a chance I'll make chutney, but I appreciate the suggestion. I just peel and cut the mangoes for DD and DH, so I still buy them when they're nice.

Now I do love our local peaches and nectarines and look forward to the season. It's not as long as yours is but the local fruit is so delicious.

Gretchen's picture

(post #37458, reply #29 of 52)

Oh, we get peaches from you all after our peaches give out. But I guess you are right about the "length" of the season.  AND we have had no "late freezes" etc. this year and the peaches should be wonderful and plentiful.  Peach growers are the WORST "poor mouths" there are!!   ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #37458, reply #34 of 52)

Our county used to be known for its peach orchards but most of the growers have sold out to real estate developers. Now, most of the peach growers grow other things, too, and they do very well.