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Ice Cream with Algin

pestocat's picture

Algin is used in making commercial ice cream in order to make it more smooth. Has anyone evere used algin in making ice cream at home. How much of it is used for a one quart recipe and when is it added to the ingredients.
Thank you,
pestocat

Adele's picture

I think it's called alginate. (post #69111, reply #1 of 9)

I think it's called alginate. I couldn't find anything for home use.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

sally ryan's picture

In my younger days I worked (post #69111, reply #2 of 9)

In my younger days I worked for a dentist and alginate was the product we used to make impressions of your teeth.
Don't think I'd want to eat too much of it!

Ozark's picture

Smooth is a product of your (post #69111, reply #3 of 9)

Smooth is a product of your recipe. Good smooth ice cream is based on the ratio of surgar to fat and how much air your maker will incorporate as it freezes. Not adding the crap that the commercial companies use. Funny my son came down this weekend and insisted we make some. 26 degrees and we go outside and start my 6qt White Mountain. We freeze in zips and will keep for two months or more. Never gets ice crystals because of the ratio. I use Doc Wilsons recipe for the last 20 years, he is in the Smithsonian with the largest historic collection of ice cream freezers. For some reason his web site doesn't exist for the last two years, I fear the worst.

 

Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

sanderson's picture

Well, issue #10 had an (post #69111, reply #4 of 9)

Well, issue #10 had an amazing article on the science of ice cream making. It had me so excited I remember scanning the whole article into the forum in answer to another ice cream making question. What I found so exciting was the authors insight and suggestion to add powdered dry milk to the mix to get a creamy, rich product. Maybe Schnitzel will be along to massage the data bank and get the archives to cough up the goods.

schnitzel's picture

Well, I remember this but (post #69111, reply #5 of 9)

Well, I remember this but haven't found it in a search. It is online here (subscription only): http://www.finecooking.com/pdf/subscribed/051010069.pdf

Let me see what I can do.

schnitzel's picture

The Key to Smooth, Rich, (post #69111, reply #6 of 9)

The Key to Smooth, Rich, Homemade Ice Cream

An ice-cream pro shares his recipes and a secret ingredient—
skim milk powder
BY ANDREW HINGSTON

Super-rich, I’d-kill-for-another-spoonful ice
cream usually comes in pint cartons, but it’s also
available in your home ice-cream maker. You may
never have found it there, however, because most
recipes don’t include an ingredient that’s guaranteed
to make the difference between good and great ice
cream. I made this discovery as a student at Penn
State’s Ice Cream School (the one that gave Ben &
Jerry their start), and I’ll show you how to make ice
cream that’s extraordinary every time.

MAKING GREAT ICE CREAM IS A SCIENCE
People are passionate about ice cream, but the main
ingredients that make it are pretty mundane: butterfat
(from cream), sugar, and water. These basic elements
form an emulsion—a mixture in which particles of fat
are dispersed in liquid. This ice-cream base is frozen
while air is whipped into it during churning.
Lots of cream, however, doesn’t necessarily
mean great ice cream. While ice cream that’s creamy
and smooth should contain 14% to 20% butterfat, too
much butterfat will make it stiff and greasy.
You also need to use ingredients that will stabilize
the emulsion, keeping the fat well distributed
for the creamiest confection. Egg yolks are the classic
ingredient for this. Eggs’ protein helps hold the
emulsion of fat and water together, and while egg
yolks have a high fat content, that type of fat adds
a pleasant richness and doesn’t add to the butterfat.
But egg yolks alone aren’t enough of a stabilizing
influence.

WHY SKIM MILK POWDER
IS IN THE BEST ICE CREAMS
Skim milk powder is the key to the quality of all natural
ice creams. Together with egg yolks, skim milk
powder helps create ice cream that’s smooth, dense,
and rich.
The protein in skim milk powder helps stabilize
the emulsion without adding fat. It does this by absorbing
most of the extra water in the ice-cream mixture.
Too little water gives ice cream a peculiarly
sandy feel on the tongue, but too much unabsorbed
water results in iciness. Instead of turning icy after
two or three days in the freezer, ice cream that’s made
with skim milk powder should last a few weeks.
Cocoa also absorbs excess water without adding
fat; this is one of the reasons it’s used instead of chocolate
in many “chocolate” ice creams. Chocolate contains
a lot of cocoa butter, a fat that quickly hardens
when chilled, which can create an ice cream that’s
difficult to scoop. But chocolate provides flavor that
cocoa alone can’t match. One solution is to use a
small amount of the most intense chocolate you can
find, such as Callebaut or Valrhôna. Since imported
chocolate can cost $20 a pound, I sometimes use unsweetened
baker’s chocolate and increase the sugar in
the recipe.

YOU HAVE TO COOK ICE CREAM
BEFORE YOU CAN FREEZE IT
The first step toward a great ice cream is to combine
sugar, milk, cream, skim milk powder, and egg yolks
and then cook the mixture to make a custard. Use a
stainless-steel bowl set over a saucepan of simmering
water so you can keep the heat low and constant.
There are two measures of the custard’s readiness:
temperature and time. The custard should thicken
noticeably as it cooks, though it should be very
smooth. (Lumps would mean that it has gotten too
hot and curdled.) Even more important, you should
keep the custard between 165° and 180°F for at least
10 to 15 minutes. Maintaining this temperature range
is vital. Anything under 165° is too low to be effective,
and even one degree above 180° can mean curdling.
After cooking, cool the custard immediately in an
ice bath until it reaches 65°. Not only does this heating
and cooling procedure improve the ice cream’s texture,
it also comes as close as possible in a home environment
to pasteurizing your mixture. Since egg
yolks can contain salmonella bacteria, you should never
skip these steps.
When the custard has cooled, add any flavorings
that contain alcohol, such as vanilla extract or a
liqueur. This ensures that the alcohol won’t evaporate
in the custard’s heat, leaving a little spirited kick. Refrigerate
the mixture for at least four hours, preferably
overnight, in a tightly covered plastic or stainless-steel
container. This storage time improves the ice cream’s
texture and flavor, but make sure the custard isn’t near
any aromatic foods in your refrigerator. The custard
can quickly pick up the flavors of garlic, onions, and
spices. After the base has been refrigerated overnight,
you should churn and freeze it that day.

CHURN IT BY HAND OR BY MOTOR
The world’s best ice cream can be made in any kind of
ice-cream maker. I currently use a Krups model, but
since all models work pretty much the same way, I
think the only real mistake you can make is choosing
one that costs too much.
Before you pour the custard into the ice-cream
maker, be sure the machine is large enough to contain
your batch; ice cream swells as it freezes. (My recipes
are designed for a 1 1⁄2-quart maker.) Freshly made ice
cream will be soft. Once it has been churned, scoop it
into a resealable plastic or stainless-steel container to
harden in the freezer for a few hours.
Keep ice cream as cold as possible. If you’ve ever
opened a container of ice cream and found that it had
become mysteriously gooey, your freezer was probably
responsible. Frost-free freezers repeatedly warm and
cool by a few degrees, which encourages the ice
cream’s water and fat molecules to separate and clump
with their own kind. That’s why you shouldn’t refreeze
ice cream after it has been brought up to serving temperature.
The best solution is to eat homemade ice
cream as soon as you can—but I don’t think that will
be a problem.

Orange Ice Cream with
Dried Cherries & Toasted Pecans
Yields 1 1⁄2 quarts.

2 medium navel oranges
2 cups heavy cream
1 cup skim milk
1⁄2 cup sugar
1⁄2 cup light brown sugar, packed
Large pinch salt
1⁄4 cup skim milk powder
5 large or 4 extra-large egg yolks
1⁄2 vanilla bean, split lengthwise
1⁄2 tsp. natural vanilla extract
1⁄2 cup dried cherries
1⁄4 cup orange juice
2 1⁄2 Tbs. Cointreau or other orange liqueur
3⁄4 cup large pecan pieces

Peel the oranges. Use a vegetable peeler to pare off the
peel in thick, smooth strips. Turn the peel over so the
white pith faces you. Scrape away the pith with the
peeler or the edge of a sharp knife. Set the zest aside.
Make the ice-cream base. Fill a medium saucepan halfway
with water and set it over medium heat. Combine
the cream, milk, sugars, salt, skim milk powder, egg
yolks, vanilla bean, and orange zest in a medium
stainless-steel bowl and whisk to mix completely.
Put the bowl on the saucepan and cook the mixture, stirring
constantly with a wooden spoon or spatula, until it
reaches between 165° and 180°F. Test the temperature
with a candy thermometer. Keep the temperature in that
range for at least 10 to 15 min., still stirring. The mixture
will thicken.
Cool the ice-cream base. At the end of the cooking
period, put the bowl in an ice bath to cool. Add the
vanilla extract. Stir frequently, replenishing the ice
as necessary, until the mixture cools to 65° (about
15 min.). Cover the bowl and refrigerate for at least
4 hours, preferably overnight.
Plump the cherries and toast the pecans. Meanwhile,
soak the dried cherries in the orange juice and Cointreau
for a few hours until plump.
Toast the pecans on a baking sheet in a 350° oven for
about 10 min., shaking the sheet occasionally to prevent
burning. The nuts are ready when they color slightly and become fragrant. Allow them to cool to
room temperature.
Freeze the ice cream. When you’re ready to freeze the ice
cream, pour the mixture through a sieve to remove the
orange zest and vanilla bean. Add half the marinated cherries
and any excess liquid from the cherries.
Begin freezing according to your ice-cream maker’s
directions. After 8 to 10 min., the ice cream should be
semisolid—about the stiffness of cake batter. At this
point, add the remaining cherries and the toasted
pecans. Continue freezing until the ice cream holds stiff
peaks. Transfer the ice cream to a resealable plastic or
stainless-steel container and freeze overnight until firm.

Customize the recipe
with fruits, nuts, and
flavorings

For some people, ice cream isn’t worth eating if it
doesn’t have “chunks.” These ingredients should be
added about 8 to 10 minutes after the ice cream has
begun freezing; at this point, the mixture will be thick
enough to prevent the chunks from sinking to the
bottom. Some additions need a little preparation before
they can be added to the ice cream, and some ice cream
bases need adjustment to accept the additions.

FRESH AND DRIED FRUITS—Fruit contains a lot of
water, which will always result in iciness. One solution is
to use a little more cream and a little less milk in the
base and to add a little extra skim milk powder to the
mixture. You also can remove some of the fruit’s water
by partially dehydrating the fruit in a very low oven for
an hour or two. While this diminishes the fruit’s fresh
flavor, it also prevents the chunks of fruit from turning
into icy fruit pebbles in your ice cream.
On the other hand, dried fruits such as raisins or
dried cherries need some liquid before they can be
added to ice cream. Plump them in fruit juice or a spirit
(such as rum, brandy, or kirsch) for an hour or two. You
won’t need much liquid—perhaps two tablespoons for
half a cup of dried fruit.

NUTS—For the best flavor, nuts should be toasted
before adding them to ice cream. Pistachios are troublemakers;
they absorb a lot of water and quickly become
soft in ice cream.

ALCOHOL—Alcohol reduces the freezing point and
makes ice cream easier to scoop. And of course there’s
the flavor alcohol can add—Chocolate-Triple Sec ice
cream is one of my favorites. After you cool the custard
base, try adding a tablespoon of alcohol for each pint
of base. For stronger flavor, add two to three tablespoons
alcohol to the mixture as it cooks. The heat will
cook out the some of the alcohol that would make the
ice cream too soft. Still, that extra liquid means you’ll
need to add a little more skim milk powder (start with
one teaspoon) to make up the difference.

Caramel Ice Cream with
Toasted Almonds
Yields 1 generous quart.

2 cups heavy cream
1 cup skim milk
1⁄2 cup light brown sugar, packed
Large pinch salt
1⁄4 cup skim milk powder
5 large or 4 extra-large egg yolks
1⁄2 cup caramel sauce (see recipe at right)
1⁄2 vanilla bean, split lengthwise
1 1⁄2 tsp. natural vanilla extract
1⁄2 cup whole blanched almonds

Make the ice-cream base. Fill a medium saucepan halfway
with water and set it over medium heat. Combine
the cream, milk, brown sugar, salt, skim milk powder,
and egg yolks in a stainless-steel bowl. Whisk to mix
completely.
Put the bowl on the saucepan and cook the mixture,
stirring constantly, until the base reaches between 165°
and 180°F. Test the temperature with a candy thermometer.
Keep the temperature in that range for 5 min. Add
the caramel sauce and the split vanilla bean. Continue
maintaining the temperature, stirring frequently, for
another 5 to 10 min. The mixture will thicken.
Cool the ice-cream base. At the end of the cooking
period, put the bowl in an ice bath to cool. Add the
vanilla extract. Stir frequently, replenishing the ice as
necessary, until the mixture cools to 65° (about
15 min.). Cover the bowl and refrigerate for at least
4 hours, preferably overnight.
Toast the almonds. Toast the almonds on a baking
sheet in a 350° oven for about 10 min., shaking the
sheet occasionally to prevent burning. The nuts are
ready when they color slightly and become fragrant.
Chop the almonds coarse and set aside.
Freeze the ice cream. Remove the vanilla bean from the
base. Freeze the base following your ice-cream maker’s directions.
After 8 to 10 min., the ice cream should be semisolid—
about the stiffness of cake batter. At this point, add
the almonds. Continue freezing until the ice cream holds
stiff peaks. Transfer the ice cream to a resealable plastic or
stainless-steel container and freeze overnight.

Hazelnut-Mocha Ice Cream
Yields 1 generous quart.

4 oz. good-quality semisweet chocolate, chopped
1 3⁄4 cups heavy cream
1 1⁄2 cups skim milk
1⁄2 cup light brown sugar, packed
5 large or 4 extra-large egg yolks
1⁄3 cup skim milk powder
Large pinch salt
1 Tbs. unsweetened cocoa powder
2 Tbs. coffee powder (preferably espresso style)
1⁄2 cup whole blanched hazelnuts
1⁄2 tsp. natural vanilla extract
1 1⁄2 Tbs. Frangelico

Prepare the chocolate. Melt the chocolate slowly in a
small bowl set over (not in) a pan of simmering water.
Stir often. When melted, take it from the heat and set
it aside.
Make the ice-cream base. Fill a medium saucepan halfway
with water and set it over medium heat. Combine
the cream, milk, brown sugar, egg yolks, skim milk
powder, and salt in a stainless-steel bowl. Add the
melted chocolate, cocoa powder, and coffee powder.
Whisk to mix completely. Don’t worry if the chocolate
appears to “curdle”; it will smooth out.
Put the bowl on the saucepan and cook the mixture,
stirring constantly, until the base reaches between
165° and 180°F. Test the temperature with a candy
thermometer. Keep the temperature in that range for
10 to 15 min. The mixture will thicken.
Cool the ice-cream base. At the end of the cooking
period, put the bowl in an ice bath to cool. Add the vanilla extract and the Frangelico. Stir frequently, replenishing
the ice as necessary, until the mixture cools to
65° (about 15 min.). Cover the bowl and refrigerate for
at least 4 hours, preferably overnight.
Prepare the hazelnuts. Toast the hazelnuts on a baking
sheet in a 350° oven for about 10 min., shaking the
sheet occasionally to prevent burning. The nuts are
ready when they color slightly and become fragrant.
Chop the nuts coarse and set aside.
Freeze the ice cream. Freeze the base according to your
ice-cream maker’s instructions. After 8 to 10 min., the ice
cream should be semisolid—about the stiffness of cake
batter. At this point, add the hazelnuts. Continue freezing
until the ice cream holds stiff peaks. Transfer the ice cream
to a resealable plastic or stainless-steel container and
freeze overnight until firm.

Caramel Sauce

This is a great ice-cream topping, or use it to make
Caramel Ice Cream with Toasted Almonds (see recipe
at left). Yields 1 1⁄2 cups.

1 cup sugar
1 cup heavy cream

Melt the sugar. Put the sugar in a heavy 3- or 4-qt.
saucepan. Set the pan over medium-high heat until the
sugar melts. Shake the pan occasionally to distribute
the unmelted sugar, but do not stir; this can encourage
lumps. When the sugar is melted and bubbly, continue
cooking, shaking the pan occasionally.
For a sweet caramel sauce, cook until the sugar turns
light brown; for a richer, less-sweet sauce, let the
caramel become medium or dark brown. (For more on
caramelizing sugar, see Fine Cooking #1, pp. 35–39.)
Add the cream. As soon as the sugar reaches the correct
color, remove the pan from the heat and begin
whisking in the cream, about 1⁄4 cup at a time. Be extremely
careful; the cream will make the caramel foam
dramatically, and you can burn yourself on the steam
or overflow.
Cook the sauce. After all the cream has been added,
return the sauce to a low flame for about a minute. If
the sauce is too thick, whisk in more cream. While still
warm, transfer the sauce to a Pyrex or stainless-steel
container. Use it immediately, or let it cool to room
temperature and rewarm it in a water bath or in
the microwave.

Andrew Hingston founded Hingston’s Iced Cream in
London. He lives in St. Helena, California.

Inspirations for flavoring ice cream

Great ice creams need a practical formula, but flavor is an area where fantasies can take flight. Below is a list of flavors to get you started.

Fresh Fruit:
Bananas
Blueberries
Cherries
Mangoes
Oranges
Peaches
Raspberries
Strawberries

Dried Fruit:
Apricots
Blueberries
Cherries
Cranberries
Dates
Peaches
Prunes
Raisins

Candies &
Confections:
Chocolate chunks
Heath bars
Peppermints
Brownies
Caramel sauce
Fudge sauce

Nuts:
Almonds
Brazil nuts
Cashews
Hazelnuts
Pecans
Walnuts

Spirits:
Amaretto
Armagnac
Cointreau
Crème de cassis
Crème de menthe
Frangelico
Kahlua or Tia Maria
Rum or whiskey

Jean's picture

I haven't even had breakfast (post #69111, reply #7 of 9)

I haven't even had breakfast yet and now I want ice cream. sigh.

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Pielove's picture

Jean, may I suggest ice cream (post #69111, reply #9 of 9)

Jean, may I suggest ice cream FOR breakfast? It's just eggs and dairy, right?

Schnitzel, thank you for finding that article-- I made the caramel ice cream years ago and it was great. The ice cream recipe from the David Leibowitz article is excellent too. We don't add any of the fancy stuff-- around here, the kiddie palate demands vanilla.

Here is the Leibowitz recipe-- just put in your specifications and it will churn out a recipe:

http://www.finecooking.com/articles/cyor/ice-cream.aspx

pie

pestocat's picture

Thank you schnitzel for (post #69111, reply #8 of 9)

Thank you schnitzel for finding that article. I have one of those Cuisinart 1 quart ice cream makers and very pleased with how it works. I used the recipe that came with the machine and did not like the results. Second batch I used the vanilla bean recipe that was in the Fine Cooking article. That one was much better, almost perfect. I will have to try this milk powder recipe. Thank you very much.
pestocat