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How long creme brulee good for?

oli's picture

I made some creme brulee without the sugar topping and was wondering how long can I keep it in the refrigerator before I need to dump it? I made it last Saturday and had only eaten a couple and did have time to finish eating the rest of them. I was going to prepare the topping for one more and dump the rest but I just don't know if it is safe anymore.

Astrid's picture

(post #36611, reply #1 of 36)

I'd take a good close sniff test, the brulee being over a week old. Is it more than watery? Take a tiny taste, maybe, of the thinner liquid. Basically I would say, sorry, it is probably too old to be enjoyable.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
oli's picture

(post #36611, reply #3 of 36)

Its about the same consistancy. I hate sniffing, the smell stays with me for days afterwards. I know, I know, its safer than being sorry.
I just sniffed it, and there was no odor whatsoever. Hmmmm
Thanks


Edited 11/2/2008 7:33 pm ET by oli

thecooktoo's picture

(post #36611, reply #4 of 36)

I've kept them wrapped with plastic wrap in the fridge for more than a week and they have always been fine.  ONly thing you need to worry about in my opinion is the refrigerator odor that they can pick up. 


Taste it.  If it tastes good, use it.  If it doesn't, throw it away.


Jim

MadMom's picture

(post #36611, reply #5 of 36)

Wonder if it's something that we old folks, whose parents grew up in the depression, have in common.  I will use anything which doesn't smell bad.  I know that isn't exactly the best test for some pathogens, but I'm still alive and kicking, so is my DH, our kids, and grandkids!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

thecooktoo's picture

(post #36611, reply #7 of 36)

I think that has all in the world to do with it.  We never threw anything away.  I know that often my mother would make a barbecue sauce out of catsup and mustard and other stuff, to help cover up the taste of meat that was in the process of going bad.


But, in 1946 my dad was a school superindent in southern Ohio, in small country schools and made 1800 dollars a year, paid $200 a month on a 9 month schedule.  And he raised two sons on that income.  But we also didn't have anybody around to tell us that we were poor, so we raised a garden if we wanted to eat all winter.


Jim

MadMom's picture

(post #36611, reply #8 of 36)

Jim, when the depression really hit, my Mom had just graduated from high school, and she had eloped with my dad.  My Mom and Dad, Aunt and Uncle, and Grandmother and Grandfather all shared one rental house.  Mom worked at J. C. Penney's and made $5/week standing on her feet all day.  I can remember eating spaghetti sandwiches (made with leftover spaghetti between two slices of bread) and a concoction my Mom called "Mock Enchiladas."  She would fry a saltine cracker, sprinkle it with diced onion, tomato sauce, and a wee bit of cheese.  Actually, they were pretty good!  No wonder we never threw anything away!  We lived in a one-bedroom house my Dad had built.  Probably the whole house wasn't the size of my current master bedroom, bath, and closet.  When my younger brother was born, we finally had the money to add a second bedroom.  The house was torn down later so the Martin Luther King, Jr., freeway could be built.  Guess it wasn't in the better part of town, LOL.  I know there were lots of people much worse off than we were, though. 



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

thecooktoo's picture

(post #36611, reply #9 of 36)

Ah boy, could these tales go on forever.  My grandmother delivered my on the screened in back porch of her house on 16th Street in Dunbar, WV in July 1938.  The Dr. stopped by a couple of days later and checked me out and signed the family bible. 


My mom quite school at 14 to go to work in the Fletcher Enamel Company plant in Dunbar where for years she applied a lead based enamel trim paint to enamel ware.  And to speed up the process, the gals that did it licked their fingers to smooth the paint, rather than use the rags provided.  Many of the old employees showed what are now recognized as signs of lead poisoning, but it never affected mom.


When I enlisted in the Navy (after receiving my draft notice) they asked for my birth certificate...didn't have one.  My aunt that still lived in the old family home took the family bible to the courthouse in Kanawa County and based on that, they issued my birth certificate.


Four years later my brother was the first member of our family ever born in a hospital.


Jim

MadMom's picture

(post #36611, reply #10 of 36)

You know, we really should stop this, but my aunt was born in "The New Mexico Territory".  Actually, she was born a couple of months after it became a state, but they were still using up the old birth certificates.  Sometimes when I tell these stories, my grandchildren just roll their eyes.  I don't think they really believe it!  I've always thought of my grandmother, who traveled across three states in a covered wagon, and lived to sit in her living room to watch, on her color TV, a man land on the moon.  I cannot imagine that you or I will see such changes, but perhaps we have and just don't know it.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

thecooktoo's picture

(post #36611, reply #11 of 36)

Yea, stop and think about it for a minute.  I was talking to my grandkids not long ago and we made  a partial list of changes in my lifetime.


I have gone from the old central office telephone (our ring was 2 longs, 3 shorts) to the dial phone to the touchtone to the cell.


I went to a three room school through the first 8 grades with three teachers for all 8 grades   Never heard of kindergarten.  29 in my high school graduating class.  As I recall, my Latin teacher, Miss Hendershot, was so old that she learned Latin direct from Ceasar!


After moving to OH in 1946 we did not have electricity or running water in the house until 1950.  We did have free natural gas form the wells on the rental property, so we had a big old Servel gas refrigerator.  Gasoline powered Maytag washing machine.


First TV station did not sign on until 3 in the afternoon and we used to sit in front of the big old Westinghouse black and white and watch the Indian Chief test pattern by the hour.


Grandparents lived 80 miles away, and that was the furthest I had ever been from home until I graduated high school and went on my senior trip by train to DC and NYC.


We had a 1937 Studebaker that Dad drove until he bought a new Plymouth in 1948 for $700.


Maybe we should get together and write a book for our grandchildren.  Of course, they wouldn't believe even half of it!


Jim

MadMom's picture

(post #36611, reply #12 of 36)

We really should...get together and write a book, that is.  I remember going from 5334 to 5-5334 to JE-5334 to JE5-5334...but then we moved before area codes came in.  When we lived in Bay St. Louis, MS, which was sometime in the late 70s, we had a five digit phone number. 


I also remember being hired by IBM when I graduated from college (the job opportunities for America's third female petroleum engineer were not exactlly booming).  When we went to a major gathering of new employees, some IBN manager predicted that someday computers would be small enough to fit on a desk.  Boy, did he think we were stupid or what?  A computer small enough to fit on a desk, as if that would ever happen.  BTW, did you know that when the IBM founder's son mentioned to his Dad that he wanted to build computers, his dad said that they had done extensive research, and there was a worldwide market for just seven computers.  The son went ahead anyway, and the rest, as they say, is history.


Computers are probably the major change of our time...that and cell phones, but I still can't imagine going from covered wagons to space walks on color TV.  Oh yeah, we paid over $600 for our first cell phone.  It was huge, but we ended up with a big battery pack we could take in its own shoulder bag, so we could get calls even when we weren't in the car.  Take that, iPhone!


(Do you think the rest of CT is ignoring us, or making plans to have us committed?)




Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!
thecooktoo's picture

(post #36611, reply #13 of 36)

Committed is probably in the offing.


Edited to add:  Of course, they may just not want to interfer with the ravings of two old farts.


Jim


 


Edited 11/3/2008 12:07 pm ET by thecooktoo

Quilter's picture

(post #36611, reply #14 of 36)

Nope, not ignoring you!  Fascinating reading actually.  OK - I never saw TV until I was in my last year of high school (1963).  When TV finally came to town, the station that started it bought tapes of the programs and we got to see everything 3 weeks late.  Including the Stanley Cup games.  Mind you, we did manage to hear the games on the radio as they were being played so it wasn't quite as bad as all that! 


When I look at my old high school annuals, I notice that there were very few overweight kids in the schools.  We didn't have cars of our own to drive and unless you lived way out of town, you walked to school. We didn't sit and watch TV for hours on end, and as a result, we spent a lot of time outdoors, getting exercise.  There also wasn't the amount of junk food available, so we snacked on fruit instead of chips and chocolate, and drank milk, not soda pop.


My grandfather and the rest of his family came to Canada by ship from Mauritius in 1909, and started a farm in Maple Ridge (now a suburb of Vancouver). We've got photos of the house they built (with the outdoor biffy proudly displayed off to the side) and there isn't another house anywhere in sight.


When my parents moved to this small town in northern BC, the population was about 1300 people.  My high school graduation class consisted of 31 proud students! When my son graduated, the grad class was just over 300, and the population of the town and surrounding area has grown to about 20,000.  Things have really changed.

Jean's picture

(post #36611, reply #15 of 36)

Apropos of this topic. I got this last week. :)


One evening a grandson was talking to his grandfather about current events.
The grandson asked his grandfather what he thought about the shootings at schools, the computer age, and just things in general.


The Grandfather replied, 'Well, let me think a minute, I was born before:


'
television

'
penicillin

'
polio shots

'
frozen foods

'
Xerox

'
contact lenses

'
Frisbees and

'
the pill

There w
ere no:

'
credit cards

'
laser beams or

'
ball-point pens

Man had not invented:


'
pantyhose

'
air conditioners

'
dishwashers

'
clothes dryers

'
and the clothes were hung out to dry in the fresh air and

'
man hadn't yet walked on the moon


Your Grandmother and I got married first, . . And then lived together.

Every family had a father and a mother.

Until I was 25, I called every man older than me, 'Sir'.
And after I turned 25, I still called policemen and every man with a title, 'Sir.'

We were before gay-rights, computer- dating, dual careers, daycare centers, and group therapy.

Our lives were governed by the Ten Commandments, good judgment, and common sense.

We were taught to know the difference between right and wrong and to stand up and take responsibility for our actions.

Serving your country was a privilege; living in this country was a bigger privilege.

We thought fast food was what people ate during Lent.

Having a meaningful relationship meant getting along with your cousins.

Draft dodgers were people who closed their fron t doors when the evening breeze started.

Time-sharing meant time the family spent together in the evenings and weekends-not purchasing condominiums.


We never heard of FM radios, tape decks, CDs, electric typewriters, yogurt, or guys wearing earrings.

We listened to the Big Bands, Jack Benny, and the President's speeches on our radios.

And I don't ever remember any kid blowing his brains out listening to Tommy Dorsey.

If you saw anything with 'Made in Japan' on it, it was junk

The term 'making out' referred to how you did on your school exam.

Pizza Hut, McDonald's, and instant coffee were unheard of.

We had 5 &10-cent stores where you could actually buy things for 5 and 10 cents.

Ice-cream cones, phone calls, rides on a streetcar, and a Pepsi were all a nickel.

And if you didn't want to splurge, you could spend your nickel on enough stamps to mail 1 letter and 2 postcards.

You could buy a new Chevy Coupe for $600, . .. . But who could afford one?
Too bad, because gas was 11 cents a gallon..

In my day:


'
'grass' was mowed,

'
'coke' was a cold drink,

'
'pot' was something your mother cooked in and

'
'rock music' was your grandmother's lullaby.

'
'Aids' were helpers in the Principal's office,

'
' chip' meant a piece of wood,

'
'hardware' was found in a hardware store and

'
'software' wasn't even a word.

And we were the last generation to actually believe that a lady needed a husband to have a baby. No wonder people call us 'old and confused' and say there is a generation gap... And how old do you think I am?

I bet you have this old man in mind...you are in for a shock!

Read on to see -- pretty scary if you think about it and pretty sad at the same time.


Are you ready ?



 


 


 


 



This man would be only…..

 

 

 

53 years old



A merry heart does good like a medicine: Prov. 22:17



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
MadMom's picture

(post #36611, reply #17 of 36)

Just imagine how much older you and I are than that gentleman!  Wonder what came about in those years?  Probably WWII, LOL.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Jean's picture

(post #36611, reply #18 of 36)

Lots of baby pictures of the Dionne quints. :)



A merry heart does good like a medicine: Prov. 22:17



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
MadMom's picture

(post #36611, reply #20 of 36)

Oh, heavens, yes.  Are any of them still alive?  Did any marry?  Funny how big they were and I haven't any idea what happened to them.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Jean's picture

(post #36611, reply #21 of 36)

The three Dionnes, Cecile, Yvonne, and Annette, live in Montreal. Emilie died in 1954, and Marie in 1970. None ever married to my knowledge.




A merry heart does good like a medicine: Prov. 22:17



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
MadMom's picture

(post #36611, reply #22 of 36)

Thank you.  I figure I could have googled, but knew someone would know!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Jean's picture

(post #36611, reply #23 of 36)

How do you think I knew? LOL



A merry heart does good like a medicine: Prov. 22:17



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
MadMom's picture

(post #36611, reply #24 of 36)

You've obviously got better instincts than I...or I am lazier than you ever thought of being!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

thecooktoo's picture

(post #36611, reply #19 of 36)

Applies to me, too!


JIm

paretsky's picture

(post #36611, reply #25 of 36)

>>This man would be only…..
>>
>>
>>
>>53 years old

And he would live in...

Never Never land.

While it is possible to pinpoint a time before all of these things were invented, it is wishful thinking to say that 54 years there were no broken homes, no suicides (even if we confine the scope of inquiry to those related to the music people were listening to) and people were generally more respectful and wholesome. But it's like they say, "nostalgia just ain't what it used to be."

"Light the lamp, not the rat! Light the lamp, not the rat!!"
Rizzo the Rat, A Muppet Christmas Carol

"Light the lamp, not the rat! Light the lamp, not the rat!!"
Rizzo the Rat, A Muppet Christmas Carol

TracyK's picture

(post #36611, reply #26 of 36)

Thank you. I really hate stuff like this.


I mean, pointing out examples of the technological progress is one thing, but pining for a time of endemic racism, sexism, and oppression of minorities and women, as if it's something we should champion instead of being ashamed? Not cool. 



"The thing I love about Senator Obama is that he is, deep down, a doer of homework. All I want is a chief executive who has done/will do the reading!"                              -- Sarah Vowell

Jean's picture

(post #36611, reply #27 of 36)

I'd say shoot me, but you're probably anti-gun.



A merry heart does good like a medicine: Prov. 22:17



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
TracyK's picture

(post #36611, reply #28 of 36)

Don't take it personally that I don't care for trite stuff you didn't write.


I didn't say anything nasty to you, and I don't deserve snarky remarks for it.



"The thing I love about Senator Obama is that he is, deep down, a doer of homework. All I want is a chief executive who has done/will do the reading!"                              -- Sarah Vowell

Jean's picture

(post #36611, reply #29 of 36)

But you're not anti-gun so I take it all back. It just pisses me that something posted in fun has to be taken so seriously- now you can just let StephenHB shoot me. I meant to address this to  him in the first place. :(



A merry heart does good like a medicine: Prov. 22:17



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
StevenHB's picture

(post #36611, reply #30 of 36)

What did I do?


Maybe we'll find direction, around some corner, where it's been waiting to meet us.


Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
Jean's picture

(post #36611, reply #32 of 36)

You're as innocent and pure as the driven snow.  I, on the other hand, am burdened with a very bad memory. Sorry. I'll go quietly now.



A merry heart does good like a medicine: Prov. 22:17



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
StevenHB's picture

(post #36611, reply #33 of 36)

I'm quite sure that you're mistaken about the "driven snow . . ."


Well, just to be clear, I wasn't offended.  I'm as likely to screw up as anyone . . .




Maybe we'll find direction, around some corner, where it's been waiting to meet us.


Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible


Edited 11/4/2008 6:56 pm ET by StevenHB

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
MadMom's picture

(post #36611, reply #34 of 36)

Hey, at our age, the memory is the first thing to go.  I'm not sure what the second thing is.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!