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How to grate horseradish

kai_'s picture

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The main things I garnered were the need to peel "as best you can", and either freeze if grating by hand, or do it in a food processor. The links that follow also have other tidbits of interesting info, but I cut/pasted the pertinent instructions from each (which I found by googling on "How to grate horseradish" btw).

kai_'s picture

(post #25936, reply #1 of 12)

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From: http://www.empirekosher.com/besthorseradish.htm

Summary: Wearing rubber gloves, peel under cold running water, cut into 1" pieces, wrap in wax paper and freeze a few hours. Then grate.

From: http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extnews/askext/pickrels/467.htm

Summary: To grate horseradish, wash and peel the root as you would a potato and dice it into small cubes. Place the cubes in the blender jar. Process no more than half a container, one load at a time. Completely
cover the blades with cold water or crushed ice before you turn the blender on. If necessary, add more water or crushed ice to finish grinding. When done, pour off excess water.

From: http://www.virtual.co.il/channels/living/kitchen/kugel.htm#kugel19

Summary: Scrub dirt off of the horseradish roots. Remove tips and any greens. Peel as best you can.
Grate horseradish in a food processor, USING THE GRATING WHEEL. It has fine holes and is not the same as the larger hole grater. Using the small hole grater produces a fine, fine horseradish.

From: http://www.netsci.org/Companies/Molsol/Cooking/horseradish.html

Summary: We tried to grate horseradish with a traditional hand grater and had about the same success we would expect in grating cardboard. We then cut the peeled root into small chunks and placed them in a mini-processor with a steel blade. The processor produced the desired result quickly with only one
minor problem. Horseradish is so strong that it permanently etched the plastic bowl of the processor,
leaving it with a slightly cloudy appearance.

Jean_'s picture

(post #25936, reply #2 of 12)

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Why would anyone want to put themselves through all this when you can buy it already graded in just about any supermarket?

kai_'s picture

(post #25936, reply #3 of 12)

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LOL Jean, my thoughts exactly! Which is why, after the first time I tried it (like one of the posts said, kinda like trying to grate cardboard), I haven't bothered. And I think the jarred type is quite good. I guess if I bought the expensive fresh Japanese type, I would have to go through the motions; but I'd rather spend that kind of $ on cheese, or something one can just open, cut, and eat! Although, having never tried that ice-in-the-blender technique, it might be worth it, for a special occasion. Somehow, I doubt it, but, ya never know.

(BTW, best horseradish I ever had was on the one and only cruise I ever took. That stuff must have been fresh, 'cause I've never tasted anything so strong from a jar. Unfortunately, it nearly sent my g/f into a coma! She turned beet red, and, seemingly, couldn't breath for a while. Her son was laughing, thinking it was a joke, I'm sure, but fortunately we got her some milk--actually, cream--and she was ok, but shaken. And this is a chile-head!)

Adele_'s picture

(post #25936, reply #4 of 12)

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Thanks Kia.

nutcakes_'s picture

(post #25936, reply #5 of 12)

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I find the stuff in a jar has an acrid off-taste. Maybe it is the preserving method. Or is there a grade I am not asking for?

CLS's picture

(post #25936, reply #6 of 12)

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I like the stuff in a jar for bloody marys. But for other preparations (such as the horseradish crusted fish I posted) fresh grated is essential. It tastes different, trust me. And since you only need a little, it's worth it.

Jean_'s picture

(post #25936, reply #7 of 12)

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The stuff I get is local so maybe there is a difference.

Carole's picture

(post #25936, reply #8 of 12)

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Kai, I grate horseradish all the time for Bloody Marys and just to keep it on hand. We can only get really good horseradish here at certain times, mainly spring.

I just peel it, chop it into pieces and put it into the good ol food processor. To store it, I put in just a little vinegar. If I am going to use it in drinks, I don't put in the vinegar. Will keep for a long while in fridge. My husband's family is Eastern European, so horseradish is a staple. Love it!!

kai_'s picture

(post #25936, reply #9 of 12)

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Thanks, Carole. I'm going to give it another try--this time using f/p.

MANthrax's picture

Fresh ground coffee vs (post #25936, reply #10 of 12)

Fresh ground coffee vs canned, fresh mashed potatoes vs flakes, fresh ground beef patties vs frozen,  fresh hollandaise vs Knorr packaged, fresh ground black pepper vs shaker pre-ground.  Some people cannot tell the differnce in any of these but then again some people can.  Some people cannot tell the difference in taste of a thai chile pepper and a jalopeno pepper I guess that would be the same here as well.  

elsgrammie's picture

grating horseradish root (post #25936, reply #11 of 12)

The answer to why would anyone put themselves through this is stubborn 91 year old Polish farm woman wants to but only after I grate the root and cook the beet for her.  Cut my hands to pieces the last time.  Easter coming and want an easier way.

Pielove's picture

Easter (post #25936, reply #12 of 12)

My in-laws also make the horseradish with beets for Easter-- it's so good on eggs. If you have a food processor, you can grate the horseradish in there-- just watch out for the fumes when you open the lid! I hope you don't end up with shredded fingers this year!