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Billll's picture

Hot soups (post #30227)

The weather says it is time. Please share a favorite soup recipe with us. I'll start it with one of my favorites- A variation on Dean Fearings masterpiece- Tortilla soup.  Ingredients include corn oil, 4 corn tortillas torn in pieces, 8 garlic cloves crushed and a Tbs of epazote chopped (cilantro may be used).  Saute these ingredients until soft.  In a food processor liquify 1 sweet onion and two cans of whole tomatoes  and add to the saute pan, bring to a boil.  Add to this 1 Tbs achiote powder, 1 Tbs ancho chili powder, 1Tbs cumin powder and a bay leaf. Add  4 Tbs tomato paste  and 2 quarts of chicken stock.  Add cayenne, white and black pepper to taste.  Stir in salt  and simmer , stirring  for 45 minutes.  Strain.  This can be frozen and heated up at will.  Serve  hot in bowls, garnished  with cooked chicken breast strips, cubed avocado, and shredded cheese.  Chopped fresh onion and lime zest are also good.  Top with fried corn tortilla strips.  Enjoy!        

evelyn's picture

(post #30227, reply #1 of 42)

Bill, this is probably my family's favourite soup.  That says a lot for this vegetarian recipe containing lentils as my 3 very young children gobble it up (and so do we adults).


FaKESS (Greek Lentil Soup)


This belongs to that category of Greek cooking called 'Ladera' which, literally translated, means 'made of oil'. Olive oil is not just a fat, it is a key ingredient and flavour booster and is totally necessary. When my oldest son was turning 4 and I asked him what he wanted for his birthday dinner, this is what he ordered.


1
 
lb small brown lentils, picked over and rinsed

2
 
large onions, minced

5
 
cloves garlic, quartered

4
 
medium carrots, grated fine

2 1/2
 
tablespoons tomato paste

3
 
large bay leaves

2
 
teaspoons salt, to taste (or you can use 3 beef stock cubes + 1/2 tsp salt for this amount)

1/4
 
teaspoon pepper

2 1/2
 
quarts boiling water

3/4
 
cup olive oil

4
 
tablespoons balsamic vinegar or 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar



10-12 servings


 


1. 
In a large pot, cover lentils with boiling water and allow to boil for 10 minutes.

2. 
Drain lentils of this ‘first boiling’ (greeks think that this process makes the lentils easier to digest – I prefer it).

3. 
Put lentils back into pot.

4. 
Add onions, garlic, carrots, tomato paste, bay leaves, salt and pepper.

5. 
Pour 2 ½ quarts of boiling water over lentils, bring to a boil.

6. 
When mixture boils, decrease temperature to leave the lentils cooking at a simmer and cook, covered, for 1 ½ hours.

7. 
Add olive oil and balsamic vinegar and simmer ½ an hour longer.

8. 
Taste.

9. 
If the lentils are still too firm to the bite, allow to cook until they are tender and soup has thickened (soup will continue to thicken as it cools).

10. 
If the soup is too thick, you can thin with a little hot water.

11. 
Traditionally, we eat this soup with lots of Kalamata olives, feta cheese and crusty bread.

12. 
I serve half the soup on one day and freeze the other half (it freezes beautifully) to serve on another day when I’m too busy to cook.

13. 
Crockpot Version: Put all the ingredients except for olive oil and balsamic vinegar into your crockpot.

14. 
Cook on low for 7 hours.

15. 
Add olive oil and balsamic vinegar and cook a further 2 hours.

16. 
Ev's notes: You can enrich this already delicious soup by making a couple of variations. Add 1/2 lb of minced bacon, but cut back the olive oil to a couple of tablespoonfuls; or add 1 lb of sliced sausage, like Kielbasa. Again, cut back on the oil.


 

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
Billll's picture

(post #30227, reply #2 of 42)

Sounds wonderful!  I love good olive oil, and  soup is my favorite vegiterian dish.

Meryl's picture

(post #30227, reply #3 of 42)

A few of my favorites are Vegetarian Tortilla Soup, Mean Chef's Yellow Pepper Soup, and a Romaine Bean Soup I throw together with either romaine lettuce or spinach and lots of garlic and onions. Let me know if you want any of these recipes.



Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #30227, reply #7 of 42)

I'd like that Romaine Bean Soup, recipe, please.

I've been on a soup kick lately, too. Made Squash Soup from frozen butternut squash and 15 bean soup this past week. I had made 15 bean soup the week before, but mom put that awful seasoning packet in! Salt city. Blech.

I have a bag of white beans and a bag of navy beans I've been wanting to do something with, and Romaine Bean soup sounds like just the ticket for the white beans.


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

Meryl's picture

(post #30227, reply #8 of 42)

No exact measurements - I just wing it. Here's my basic recipe: Sautee loads of garlic and onions in EVOO. Add a couple of tomatoes and parsley. Add several cans of low sodium chicken broth, about 5, then add 2 romaine hearts, shredded, and 3 cans of beans, rinsed and drained OR add the beans at the end of cooking so they don't get mushy (I do 2 cans white and 1 can pinto). Bring to a boil, cover pot, and simmer till romaine is wilted. Salt and pepper to taste. Serve with lots of grated Parmigiano Reggiano, plus some good crusty bread.




 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 



Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst


Edited 12/23/2004 7:04 pm ET by Meryl

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #30227, reply #10 of 42)

that sounds good, and very quick! I like it!

You use spinach in it, too? Would most greens work, like Kale?


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

Meryl's picture

(post #30227, reply #12 of 42)

Most greens should work. I prefer romaine, because it gives it crunch, and my husband prefers spinach, but they're both great.


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

Lword's picture

(post #30227, reply #41 of 42)

Every one of these soups sounds so good, but I made a variation of yours (below) and it's great, thanks Meryl!


Here's my tweaks as I can rarely leave well enough alone :) Used a whole romaine instead of just the hearts, and added the green tops at the end. Added some lemon juice and a bit of dried Greek oregano, but no pintos. 


"Sautee loads of garlic and onions in EVOO. Add a couple of tomatoes and parsley. Add several cans of low sodium chicken broth, about 5, then add 2 romaine hearts, shredded, and 3 cans of beans, rinsed and drained OR add the beans at the end of cooking so they don't get mushy (I do 2 cans white and 1 can pinto). Bring to a boil, cover pot, and simmer till romaine is wilted. Salt and pepper to taste. Serve with lots of grated Parmigiano Reggiano, plus some good crusty bread."


L.
L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
Meryl's picture

(post #30227, reply #42 of 42)

Glad you liked it, L!


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

Billll's picture

(post #30227, reply #14 of 42)

The yellow pepper soup sounds interesting. Would love  the recipe.

Meryl's picture

(post #30227, reply #18 of 42)

Hey Bill, The Yellow Pepper Soup is included in Mean Chef's recipes on Recipezaar - just use the link Mean posted (you can also read the reviews there, including mine). If you can't find it, let me know and I'll post it.


 



Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

Billll's picture

(post #30227, reply #19 of 42)

I saw it--thanks

Meryl's picture

(post #30227, reply #31 of 42)

Here's another great one:


CARROT SOUP WITH SPINACH CHIFFONADE


*Note: I increased the amounts of ground ginger and fresh ginger, plus I added some ground cardamom and curry powder.



4 cups (or more) canned low-salt chicken broth (I used 4 cups)


1 pound carrots, peeled, sliced


1 8-ounce russet potato, peeled, cut into cubes


1 medium onion, chopped


1 teaspoon ground ginger (I used about 1 1/2 tsp)


2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice


1 teaspoon minced peeled fresh ginger (I used about 1 1/2 tsp)


2 cups packed thinly sliced spinach leaves (I used flat leaf spinach, whole leaves)


1/2 cup plain nonfat yogurt (I used more)


Combine 4 cups broth, carrots, potato, onion and ground ginger in large saucepan and bring to boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer until vegetables are very tender, about 25 minutes. (I simmered vegetables about 15 minutes).


Using slotted spoon, transfer vegetables to processor. Puree until smooth. With machine running, gradually add soup broth to processor. Return soup to same saucepan, thinning with more broth if necessary. Add lemon juice and fresh ginger; simmer 3 minutes. Add spinach and simmer until wilted, about 2 minutes. Season soup with salt and pepper. Ladle into bowls. Swirl 1 heaping spoonful of yogurt into each bowl. (I used about 1 1/2 heaping tablespoons per bowl).


Serves 4.



Per serving: calories, 158; fat, 2 g; cholesterol, 1 mg; sodium, 127 mg



B o n  A p p é t i t


June 1995





 



Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

Syrah's picture

(post #30227, reply #32 of 42)

That looks lovely and so healthy too. I think I will try that this winter. Thank you for the recipe.

"The truth lies in between the first and the fortieth drink" Tori Amos, Concertina

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Meryl's picture

(post #30227, reply #33 of 42)

You're welcome, Syrah. I love this soup!


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #30227, reply #5 of 42)

Gretchen's picture

(post #30227, reply #13 of 42)

After the holidays I will be glad to post some faves.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Billll's picture

(post #30227, reply #22 of 42)

I will look forward to it.  If you have a chance try the tortilla soup.  Happy Holidays!

Billll's picture

(post #30227, reply #15 of 42)

Great website! Everybody needs to look at this.

Billll's picture

(post #30227, reply #34 of 42)

Have you ever heard of  Cooters stew?  It is supposed to be a rustic turtle soup from the east coast.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #30227, reply #35 of 42)

No I have not.  Sounds like some Southern swamp thing.

MadMom's picture

(post #30227, reply #36 of 42)

The Daily Show did an interview with the mayor and other officials of some southern town which was going to hold a Cooter Festival to celebrate the local turtles.  Seems that Cooter is also a word used to describe a certain part of the female anatomy (starts with a V, guys!) and there was a big ruckus with a lot of people wanting to change the name of the festival.  The mayor hung tough, though, and the director of Parks and Wildlife proudly showed off her cooter on television...the turtle, that is.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

UncleDunc's picture

(post #30227, reply #37 of 42)

Interesting to think about the etymology of that. Wonder if 'snapper' featured anywhere in that chain of associations?

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #30227, reply #38 of 42)

Those swamp people have no class

canarygirl's picture

(post #30227, reply #39 of 42)

*giggle*


Soups definately warm the soul in the winter!!  How about a nice lentil stew?


Ingredients:


500g lentils (pardina)


1 onion, diced


2-3 cloves garlic, minced


1 carrot sliced


3 small zucchinis, quartered and sliced


1 small sweet potato, peeled and chopped into bite sized pieces


2-3 smaller potatoes, peeled and chopped into bite sized pieces


1 cup chopped pumpkin or squash


2 Galician chorizos, sliced


250g smoked bacon, cut into bite sized pieces (use a scissors--it'll save time)


2/3 cup tomato sauce


1 bay leaf


2 knorr beef boullion cubes (double size)


thyme to taste (about 1/2 teaspoon or so)


salt and pepper to taste


water


Rinse and separate lentils.


Place all ingredients in a large soup pot and cover with enough water to cover the vegetables, plus about another inch or two.


Heat to boiling, then cover and reduce heat to low.


Simmer for 2-3 hours, depending on desired thickness, stirring occassionally.


Serve with crusty french baguettes and fresh cheese (queso fresco).

MadMom's picture

(post #30227, reply #4 of 42)

Jean's Barley soup is TDF - even better reheated.  I'm sure it's in T&T.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

transona5's picture

(post #30227, reply #6 of 42)

Ertwensoep (Dutch pea soup)


1 lb. dried split green peas- picked over and rinsed -add them to 9 cups water, bring to a boil, boil for 2 minutes, cover, and remove from the heat. Let sit covered for an hour.
     While you're waiting, chop 6 well-washed leeks (white and light green parts only), and 5 celery stalks with leaves. Mince 4 cloves of garlic.
      After peas have soaked add your chopped vegetables, a couple of smoked ham hocks, 2 Tbs dried summer savory, and salt and pepper.
     Bring to a boil, reduce heat to a simmer, and cook, stirring occasionally, for at least 2 hours. Remove hocks, cool, and harvest whatever meat you can and return it to the soup. While the hocks are cooling, slice 1/2 lb of smoked sausage - I use an all beef or beef/pork sausage made locally- and halve it lengthwise and slice half-moon shapes. Keep stirring--this is when the soup is most likely to scorch! Add the sausage to the soup and cook until heated through -- about 20 minutes. Taste for seasoning. The soup should be thickened enough that your spoon will stand up in it. You will have to add a bit of water the next day to thin it out.


Serve with buttered pumpernickel. A rib-sticking, gut-busting treat for all. 

 

Ozark's picture

(post #30227, reply #9 of 42)

Eileen posted this some time ago. Should be in T&T.


 



I made this recipe from Nick Stellino's "Mediterranean Flavors" last week, and the family went nuts!  It was so good, that I thought I'd love to share with you guys.  I made it on a weeknight, after work.  It was that easy


 


Cabbage and Sausage Soup



2 tablespoons olive oil


1 1/2 pounds Italian sausage, cut into 1/2" pieces


2 white onions, sliced


4 garlic cloves, thickly sliced


1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes


1/2 teaspoon salt


1/4 teaspoon pepper


1/2 cup oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, chopped


1/2 cup white wine


1/2 pound green cabbage, thinly sliced (about 4 cups)


6 cups chicken stock


8 slices toasted garlic bread, cut 1/2" thick


(Toast Italian bread slices under broiler until edges are brown on both sides, but center is still white.  Remove from the oven. When cool enough to handle, rub 1 side with a garlic clove)


Heat the olive oil in a small stockpot or Dutch oven set on high heat until sizzling, about 2 minutes. Add the sausage and cook for 3 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, remove the sausage to a bowl, and set aside. Add the onions, garlic, red pepper flakes, salt, pepper and sun-dried tomatoes to the same pan and cook on medium-high for 3-5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions are soft. Stir in the wine and cook for 1-2 minutes. Add the cabbage, the reserved cooked sausage and the chicken stock and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer with the lid slightly ajar for 10-15 minutes, until the cabbage is tender.



To serve, place a piece of the garlic toast in the bottom of a shallow soup bowl and ladle the soup over the top.


 



Eileen     

 

Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

wisekaren's picture

(post #30227, reply #11 of 42)

Here's a nice variation on chicken vegetable soup that I discovered last winter. Put a large chicken and an extra pound of wings in the pot, cover with water, and bring to a boil. Add a sweet potato, 3 onions, 3 parsnips, 2 turnips, and 12 carrots and boil for an hour and a half. Then add 6 celery stalks and a handful of parsley and boil for another 45 minutes. Then remove the chicken and toss it (it will be completely useless by then). Puree all the veggies until thick and chunky and return to the well-reduced stock. YUM YUM YUM!
Karen

Billll's picture

(post #30227, reply #16 of 42)

You made one hell of a stock!!