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Henckel Knives

Waud2's picture

I hope I've posted this in the proper folder.
Our Canadian Tire Stores up here have Henckel knives on sale at 50% off their regular price. I bought the 8" carving knife @ $14.99, the paring knife @ $8.99, and the sharpener @ $ 12.49. Tho' the prices to me seemed still a little expensive, was this a good deal? Are these knives as good as what some people have told me? I really wanted to get some good knives esp with the Christmas dinner coming up and I didn't want any more family members destroying the Turkey with their carving habits.

soccermom's picture

(post #30180, reply #1 of 79)

I have always been happy with my Henkels, which are 20 years old. However, I believe there may be different types of Henkels, so cannot say how good a deal you have.


Where are you in Canada? I think I'll check Canadian Tire in Toronto to see if they're offering the same deal. Thanks for the news.


 


 

 

 

Waud2's picture

(post #30180, reply #6 of 79)

hi,
I'm just outside of Hamilton, I beleive it's in their flyer this week, on sale till Sat.

TracyK's picture

(post #30180, reply #2 of 79)

Even adjusting for Canadian dollars those prices seem awfully low... I suspect they are not the top line of Henckels knives. I paid about US$75 for my Henckels 8" chef's knife.



You say I'm a b---- like that's a bad thing.

Waud2's picture

(post #30180, reply #7 of 79)

looking at the pkging, I see that they are called International Fine Edge Pro, looking at the blade it says 'German Stainless Steel, made In China.
I guess I got the low end line. If anyone has experience with the low end and if they aren't that great I'll return them, I don;t want to get knives that are the same quality as 'dollar store' knives!

Adele's picture

(post #30180, reply #10 of 79)

I'm sure they are not dollar store quality.  At those prices I'd keep them, while keeping an eye out for the better ones.  I'm now going to start upgrading my knives, but it will be a slow process. 

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Waud2's picture

(post #30180, reply #12 of 79)

you're right, I'll see how they work and then maybe work towards getting some good ones slowly one at a time!

ashleyd's picture

(post #30180, reply #3 of 79)

What you have probably got is some of the Henckels International range, which is their "value" range, not a bad price for a reasonable knife, especially if you get on with it, knives are very personal.


“In victory you deserve Champagne, in defeat you need it.”
Napoleon Bonaparte

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Waud2's picture

(post #30180, reply #8 of 79)

thanks, yes from what I see they are definitely their International lines.

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #30180, reply #4 of 79)

Henckel's produces several different lines of knives at several different levels of quality. At those prices (even accounting for the 50% off), you've probably got their low end knives. I have no experience with this line, so I can't offer any advice, excep to try them out and see how you like them.

Personally I love my Henckels. The 4 star line balances perfectly in my hand.

deejeh's picture

(post #30180, reply #5 of 79)

The way to figure out whether the knives are from the low-end line is to look at the logo.  If it features 2 little figures, it's the German-made, high-end.  If it's got only one little figure, it's from the international line, and was made in South America or possibly China...or so the guy at the restaurant supply store told me.

Waud2's picture

(post #30180, reply #11 of 79)

seems that the guy at the restaurant is right, only one figure on the logo and says made in China, except for the sharpener which is made in Germany. Thanks for the info, now I have to decide whether I should keep them or get the better ones. I have many mediocre ones, I just want a couple of good knives even tho' I'm not the best in the kitchen I do cook and bake frequently and would like not to have roasted beef cut 3/4" thick!

Gretchen's picture

(post #30180, reply #13 of 79)

These may be restaurant grade knives. Victorinox makes a line that I have several paring knives of.  Give them a test drive. They were certainly reasonable enough and you know, of course, that you're not going to get the top of the line for that price.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Waud2's picture

(post #30180, reply #14 of 79)

since I'm really not a conniseur in the kitchen looking at the regular selling price sort of made me think that they were a great buy, a 3" paring knife regularily selling for 16.99? a little pricy for me!

Glenys's picture

(post #30180, reply #15 of 79)

I'm curious if the blades are honed or machine edged. If they're the beveled machine edge, take them back. Gretchen advice on the Victorinox paring knives is correct, I buy almost nothing but. They have great little knives for under $10 in our own money! I actually like blade steel of the Henckels one Twin from Brazil. It's softer and easier to maintain than the German steel.

Waud2's picture

(post #30180, reply #16 of 79)

sorry, can't tell if they're machined, any way that I can tell the difference? should I on go on google and take a look of some images?

Glenys's picture

(post #30180, reply #17 of 79)

The kind of edge that, for lack of a better description, looks like the blade was cut into a wedge shape. In other words, it's not a flat blade but it has a flat side and a defined angle down to the edge, like you see on cheaper knives at the grocery store.

Waud2's picture

(post #30180, reply #18 of 79)

okay then these are not beveled, they are flat edge. I just googled on them, it appears that they are a pretty good knife for the money, definitely not dollar store buys, so I will keep them and give them a try, they have to be better than what I have now, I think a wiltshire knife from 20 years ago, and some other cheaper block set! thanks!

Glenys's picture

(post #30180, reply #23 of 79)

I have an almost new oak Henckel knife block. If you'd like it send me your mailing address and I'll send it off to you. It doesn't have any scratches, it's perfectly clean, it just doesn't go in the new kitchen so Henckel sent new ones.

Waud2's picture

(post #30180, reply #24 of 79)

that is great! yes I'll take it thanks, I don't have anything other than seeds to offer, if you let me know the shipping amount I'll send that off to you!

Geoffchef's picture

(post #30180, reply #19 of 79)

My favourite kitchen supply store guy tells me that the Victorinox chef's knives are excellent value. He says you have to spend twice the money to get better steel. There are also very reasonably priced Japanese knives available from Lee Valley Tools. I have one - laminated steel, carbon, not stainless, takes and holds at least as good an edge as my Henckels for 1/3 the price.

 


 


The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.


-Robert W. Service

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Waud2's picture

(post #30180, reply #20 of 79)

boy, do I have a lot to learn! :-)

Geoffchef's picture

(post #30180, reply #21 of 79)

That's why we're here, because everybody here has something to learn and something to share. Fun, ain't it? :-)

 


 


The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.


-Robert W. Service

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Waud2's picture

(post #30180, reply #22 of 79)

yes absolutely!

Waud2's picture

(post #30180, reply #9 of 79)

thanks for the input!

cookie1's picture

(post #30180, reply #25 of 79)

I have Henckel knives for quite some time and 5-star and those prices are dirt cheap.


Cheryl

Cheryl

It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice!

Waud2's picture

(post #30180, reply #26 of 79)

are you talking about the International series that I got? or are the 5 star the better ones to get?

ashleyd's picture

(post #30180, reply #27 of 79)

5 Star is one of the "quality" Zwilling Henckels ranges rather than Henckels International "ranges" 



“In victory you deserve Champagne, in defeat you need it.”
Napoleon Bonaparte

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Waud2's picture

(post #30180, reply #28 of 79)

so then it's better value wise to get the 5 star rather than the International? I'm sorry for sounding so stupid on this!

ashleyd's picture

(post #30180, reply #29 of 79)

Not necessarily. The best knife is one you are comfortable with (essential), will take a decent edge (vital), will keep the edge for a while (useful) and lasts a long time (so-so, depends on use). If you spend a lot of time with your knives, say you're a pro cook or a busy home cook then durability becomes much more important, but for the occasional user who cares? Try the ones you've got, if you like the feel of them, can keep them in trim with regular use of the steel and an occasional sharpen then keep them and be happy you have a bargain. If not you may have to look for a "better" knife.


“In victory you deserve Champagne, in defeat you need it.”
Napoleon Bonaparte

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #30180, reply #30 of 79)

Ditto what Ashley said. For example, my preferred chef's knife is a Henckels 4 star - which is basically the same blae as a 5 star, but with a handle designed for slightly smaller hands.