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Grocery Prices across the forum area?

Ricks503's picture

There was mention of how much people spend on groceries in another thread, and that got me to wondering how much prices differed from location to location.


From what I remember of my last grocery trip:


Milk - $2.50 per gallon ( have seen it on sale for $2 and major brands go for $3)


Butter - store brand is $3 per lb


Bread - sliced whole wheat - $1.29 per loaf


Whole chicken - $1.39 per lb


Broccoli - $1.69 /lb


Cucumber - $0.79 each


Green onions and radishes - $0.50 per bunch


Top Sirloin steak - $4.99 per lb


20% lean  ground beef - $2.49 per lb.


1 - measure the board twice, 2 - cut it once, 3 - measure the space where it is supposed to go        4 - get a new board and go back to step 1

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #32449, reply #1 of 55)

Hmm, I just did a big shopping on Saturday, but my receipt is in the car, but I know my milk is more than that.

Milk - $3.00 approx.

Bread - $1.50 for Ellie's white bread; $2.99 for Mom's Melba rye, $2.99 for Thomas' English muffins or $1.50 for store brand (which suck lately)

Potatoes - $2.99 for a 5 pound bag of russets or "golden" potatoes; $3.99 for a 3 pound bag of red or white potatoes; sweety tatos are usually on sale at one of my two stores for around $.80/pound

Onions - $2.99 for a 3 pound bag of yellow onions

Ground chuck - $2.79/pound

Chicken breast - bone in, skin on, $3.49/pound

Chicken, whole - $.99/pound

Butter - around $3/pound

And the crowd was stilled.  One elderly man, wondering at the sudden silence, turned to the Child and asked him to repeat what he had said.  Wide-eyed, the Child raised his voice and said once again, "Why, the Emperor has no clothes!  He is naked!"
                -- "The Emperor's New Clothes"

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

cookie1's picture

(post #32449, reply #10 of 55)

Whole chickens are pretty inexpensive. I pay $1.69 to $1.99 depending where I go and sometimes whether it is on sale.


Cheryl


It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice!

Cheryl

It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice!

Ricks503's picture

(post #32449, reply #11 of 55)

per pound or per chicken?

1 - measure the board twice, 2 - cut it once, 3 - measure the space where it is supposed to go        4 - get a new board and go back to step 1

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

Adele's picture

(post #32449, reply #12 of 55)

I'm retracting my milk price, it was $3.17.  :)

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

cookie1's picture

(post #32449, reply #39 of 55)

It is per pound. (Bell and Evans)


Cheryl


It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice!


Edited 4/19/2006 9:07 pm ET by cookie1

Cheryl

It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice!

Gretchen's picture

(post #32449, reply #2 of 55)

Try out $3.79 for milk. Costco is like $2.50, and even 7-11 is less than supermarket.  Chicken is $0.99/lb.  Rest seems about the same.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Adele's picture

(post #32449, reply #3 of 55)

Your getting milk cheap!  I paid $3.49 for a gallon at Wal-Mart last night.   Butter I buy at Costco, and that's 3 lbs for 7.49 (I think, it's 7 something).  The only steak I buy is London Broil and only when it's on sale for $2.99.  I don't buy hamburger meat, because I don't use it.   Scallions were on sale for 50 cents a bunch, broccoli is evil so I don't know.  Whole chicken, again, I only buy it on sale and that would be less than a dollar a pound.   I only buy fruits/veggies that are on sale, matter of fact, I pretty much buy meat/fish/seafood/ only when it's on sale. 

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

elizaram's picture

(post #32449, reply #4 of 55)

Your prices sound about right for this area (Wisconsin), though dairy products tend to be cheaper here. Skim milk fluctuates from $2-2.30 per gallon; butter is about $2.30 a pound at the grocery store, but is under $2 per pound in bulk at Sam's Club.

I rarely buy fresh vegetables out of season - in the winter we get by on squash, carrots, and frozen green stuff. Green onions are 35 cents a bunch at the Asian grocery (more at the supermarket). I'll sometimes buy broccoli when it goes on sale for 99 cents a pound. In season, we buy all our veggies through CSA or at the farmer's market, so they can be pretty cheap.

I normally only buy meat at Sam's or when it is on sale as a loss leader (in which case I stock up and freeze the excess). If I wait long enough and watch the sale flyers like a hawk, I can get bone-in chicken breasts for 99 cents a pound, whole chickens for 79 cents a pound, leg quarters for 50 cents a pound. Pork loin and Boston butt are both under $2 per pound at Sam's. Sausage or good bacon, about $2.50. For ground meat, I wait till boneless chuck goes on sale for $1.69, buy a ton and grind my own. We also eat a lot of vegetarian meals (beans, eggs, cheese). If we went all vegetarian, I could probably spend even less on groceries, but that would definitely get us feeling deprived, so I won't do that until I have no other choice.

Mass market type bread (except the pale squishy stuff) is at least $2 per loaf. I bake all our bread though, since we're trying to avoid HFCS and it's impossible to find a reasonably priced loaf that doesn't have it. Costs about 50 cents per loaf to make.

I'm a tightwad to begin with, but our current situation has made it necessary to squeeze the budget as tightly as possible. (I'm a stay at home mom, and my husband started self-employment in November and still has not made any money at it.) My strategy is to track prices and stock up when things are cheap; watch sales and plan meals around them; use leftovers creatively; stick to the cheapest cuts of meat; make absolutely everything from scratch; and to learn to enjoy simple things. (A bowl of homemade soup with a slice of buttered fresh-baked bread is both very satisfying and very inexpensive.) I don't clip coupons unless they are in the store flyer and required to get a sale price. The sort of things coupons are for are mostly not the things we eat, and even when they are, the generic brand is usually cheaper.

So far I've been able to get our average food expenditure down to about $40 per week. I sure hope I don't have to go much lower, though; I don't think I could do that without going vegetarian, which would definitely leave us feeling deprived.




Food-forward parents like mine served dinners of homemade falafel, Mediterranean fish stew or stir-fried beef with broccoli. To me, dishes like spaghetti and meatballs, mashed potatoes with gravy and macaroni and cheese seemed exotic and unattainable. --Julia Moskin (NYT)



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

Ricks503's picture

(post #32449, reply #5 of 55)

I make a chicken cluck. I always buy whole and then when roating, I but out the backbone and roast butterflied on potatos.  The backbone gets cut up and  goes into a bag, along with the ends and skins of onions, the bottom of a bunch of celery, tops and skins of carrots and frozen.  When chicken is on a good sale, I will boil a pot of water, add a whole chicken, bring back to a boil and then turn it off and let it sit for 1 hr.  at that time the chicken is cooked. I will then take off the skin and pull off the meat to use in other dishes.  I then put the carcass and whatever is in the chicken bag in the freezer into the liquid the chicken boiled in, add a quarterd onion, 2 carrots and 4 stalks of celery rough cut along with 2 bay leaves and some peppercorns.  Put that into the dutch oven and put into a 200* oven for 6-8 hrs and then salt to taste to create a nice broth, which I will then take half of and reduce to a stock/consomme and freeze.


I will use the shredded chicken in chicken salad sandwichs, chicken and dumplings, chicken enchiladas, chicken tacos or something else.


When pork roast is on sale, I will cook one in the pressure cooker for 3 hrs and then shred that for a number of dishes.


1 - measure the board twice, 2 - cut it once, 3 - measure the space where it is supposed to go        4 - get a new board and go back to step 1

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

elizaram's picture

(post #32449, reply #7 of 55)

I see we think alike then. :-) I do the same with the 50-cent leg quarters (which include backbone). I bone out the thighs and freeze those for later use; simmer the bones with the drumsticks till the meat is cooked, and remove that; then simmer everything that's left with carrots, celery, bay leaves, peppercorns, and anything else I've been saving to make stock. I can get at least 3 meals that way out of $2.00 worth of chicken.




Food-forward parents like mine served dinners of homemade falafel, Mediterranean fish stew or stir-fried beef with broccoli. To me, dishes like spaghetti and meatballs, mashed potatoes with gravy and macaroni and cheese seemed exotic and unattainable. --Julia Moskin (NYT)



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

unbaked's picture

(post #32449, reply #6 of 55)

San Diego purportedly has the highest milk prices in the nation. Last time I looked, a gallon was about 4.50..though you can get the off-brand two-fers (what would I do with two GALLONS of milk?) for about 6.00 or so, but I'm not going to throw away food to save the money, so we limit our milk purchases.

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

Adele's picture

(post #32449, reply #8 of 55)

I don't understand why I'm paying $3.50 at Wal-Mart.  It's 4.25 at the Shell, almost 4 at Publix and Albertson's.  I know it's less that 3.50 at Costco, but I still think it's around $3.00 there.


Edit:  This is 2%, not even regular milk.


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!


Edited 4/18/2006 3:39 pm ET by Adele

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

KyleW's picture

(post #32449, reply #9 of 55)

Milk - $3.58 Gallon


Butter - $4.59/LB


Bread - Store Bought? You can buy bread in a store ? :-)


Chicken - Broiler (4LB) $2.99/LB   Roaster (6.5LB)  $1.49/LB


Broccoli - $2.49/Bunch


Cucumber - $0.99 each


Scallions - $.49/bunch   Radishes - $1.69/bunch


Bone In Sirloin steak - $6.49/LB


80% Lean Ground Chuck - $2.99/LB    85% Lean Ground Round - $3.99/LB


 


At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.

 

At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.

Wolvie's picture

(post #32449, reply #13 of 55)

oh man - I don't usually notice. I know that due to a great local butcher, I currently pay way less for great meat than most. For example: top sirloin runs about $2.79/lb. Filet Mignon is $6.99 / lb - all the other cuts fall somewhere in between. Hamburger, on the rare occasion that I buy it, is around $1.75/lb - 90% lean. Grd pork is under a dollar.


Pork is dirt cheap - and this is for organic (but locally raised) stuff - I can't think of anything over 2 bucks per pound, except for baby back ribs - those are 3.99 - hardly anything else is  over a buck 30.


As for produce and regular grocery store items - that's where I fail to notice the $$.


I'll have to look at stuff today. I know I think it's high for the quality.(lack thereof)


 No mans error becomes his own Law; nor obliges him to persist in it


THOMAS HOBBES, Leviathan, part 2, p. 237 (1950).

 

Marcia's picture

(post #32449, reply #14 of 55)

I only buy milk a quart at a time and not very often, so I really can't say. I like butter from Trader Joe's because the price is good as is the turnover. Lately Cabot has been over $4.00 per pound, which is a steep increase. I buy only kosher or organic chicken and it's pricy, but I couldn't really say how much. Isn't that awful?


I can't believe all the posts with .50 scallions. We never find a bunch for under .99 and usually it's more like $1.29. Broccoli has been over $2 a bunch.

Quilter's picture

(post #32449, reply #15 of 55)

From the current Safeway flyer - in Canadian dollars:


Strip loin steak - $7.99 lb.


Pork loin centre cut chops - $2.99 lb.


Tomatoes - $1.99 lb.


Regular ground beef - $.99 lb. (which I never buy)


Chicken thighs and legs - bone-in, skin on - $2.19 lb.


12 lb box oranges - $6.99


milk never goes on sale - 4 litres of 1% - $3.58


butter - $3.99 lb. for store brand, nearer $5.00 for premium brands


We often get great deals on whole frying chickens - but the last time I bought a roasting chicken I paid $13.49 for it, and it weighed 4.5 lbs.


Don't even ask me about the cost of gas for the car!


 

madnoodle's picture

(post #32449, reply #16 of 55)

I find Safeway expensive.  I can usually find milk for $3.29/4L at SuperStore or, oddly, Shoppers' Drug Mart (where milk is "on sale" every other week).  The cheapest butter at SuperStore is around $3.39/lb.  I buy ground beef from a farmer friend for $1.50/lb.  It's nice and lean and comes from happy cows.  Eggs come from another friend for $1.50/doz.  I could probably find them cheaper at the grocery store, but they're huge and beautiful and come right to my door, and I'd rather support an independent producer than a huge corporation.  I rarely buy meat unless it's on 10% off day at Sobey's.  I do know that my corner grocery store--where prices are generally really high--has good deals on meat if you watch for them.  Right now pork tenderloin is $3.99/lb, which is cheaper than at the big grocery stores.

Saskatchewan:  our mountain-removal project is nearly complete.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Quilter's picture

(post #32449, reply #25 of 55)

We have very little choice in grocery shopping here (northern BC).  Safeway, Save-On(a BC company with prices on a par with Safeway) and we have a Wholesale Club, but it's a horrible shopping experience - freezing cold building, only 3 check-outs and never all three open at the same time.  Bargains can be had, of course, if you buy in bulk but that's not always an option.  We do have a Wal-Mart and I shop there weekly for the bargains.  An example of the price differences - Kellogg's All-Bran - Wal-mart $3.47 a box, Safeway and Save-On $5.27. I buy eggs from a woman who has a dozen chickens and they're great - and only $2.50 a dozen, where the store charge at least $3.50 for "free range". We also have a deli that brings in meat from a small butcher in Smithers.  Frozen of course, but a good selection and all organic.  And decent prices.  We've had farmed Bison and Elk from there as well as beef, and chicken and they've all been delicious.

madnoodle's picture

(post #32449, reply #36 of 55)

I feel your pain.  I lived in a small town for years before moving here.  There we had two grocery stores:  Extra Foods, with produce so dreadful that I refused to shop there, and Co-op, where the folks were friendly, the products were high-quality, but the prices, oy.  Whenever I got to a city I'd fill the car with groceries and stuff like paper towels and shampoo.  I think I hit rock-bottom the day I couldn't find dried oregano anywhere in town.  I still remember the week the Co-op got fennel in.  I think I was the only one who bought it, since they never carried it again.


Where are you in northern BC?  I visited Smithers once about 10 years ago and wanted to move there. 


Saskatchewan:  our mountain-removal project is nearly complete.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Quilter's picture

(post #32449, reply #38 of 55)

We're in Terrace, (well, 15 miles out of town on the local lake) about 140 miles closer to the coast than Smithers.  Smithers is a lovely little town,  but it's Safeway and Supervalue for grocery shopping. They also miss being in the 'temperate rain forest' that Terrace enjoys(?).  I'd almost kill for a long, dry (but not too hot) summer. 

madnoodle's picture

(post #32449, reply #40 of 55)

Wow, nice part of the world.  I'd give up cheap and plentiful groceries to live where you do.

Saskatchewan:  our mountain-removal project is nearly complete.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

RheaS's picture

(post #32449, reply #47 of 55)

Welcome to the site, Quilter. I grew up in Houston. I can't say I miss it all that much, but I do like your part of the interior. We used to go camping in rainy Prince Rupert while Dad went halibut fishing or crabbing.

Quilter's picture

(post #32449, reply #51 of 55)

We used to go camping in rainy Prince Rupert while Dad went halibut fishing or crabbing


It's still rainy although two days ago they had snow.  Quite a bit judging by the announcer on CBC radio.  He was quite vocal about how miserable it was.


Actually, I've been hanging around the site for quite awhile, but I don't post very often.  But I read everything everyone else posts. 


I've been to Houston.  As if I could miss it on the way to anywhere from here.  Nice warm, dry area.  Terrible shopping.

Marcia's picture

(post #32449, reply #19 of 55)

I don't even look at tomatoes this time of year and canned seem to be about the same as always. There has been price creep on pretty much everything due to higher fuel costs, and those will be increasing more for everyone I'm sure. I've really noticed the increases more at the warehouse clubs.


Thank you kindly for translating Canadian loonies and such for a poor ignorant neighbor to the south. I just learned about loonies from this forum and find the term charming. This is the first chance I've had to use the word, so please forgive me if I couldn't resist.

evelyn's picture

(post #32449, reply #17 of 55)

Current prices in Greece - I have converted from kilos into pounds and from Euros into $.

Potatoes - 45 cents a lb

beef - most cuts $6.30 a lb - better cuts are priced higher

pork - $3 a lb

chicken - $4.30 a lb

milk - $2.50 for a half gallon (2 litres)

bread - purchased a bakery, fresh, daily, 75 cents per lb

butter - anywhere from $1.35 to $2.50 for 8 oz, depending on brand and origin

dried pasta - $1.75 per lb

dried beans - $3.50 per lb (for most types)

flour - $1.15 per lb for a Greek brand, much higher to buy an imported, 'hard' flour, like Robin Hood

tomatoes - $1.85 per lb

bananas - 95 cents per lb

cucumbers - (English, seedless) 2 for $1.25

artichokes - 10 for $6.20

apples - $1.00 per lb

 

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
Adele's picture

(post #32449, reply #18 of 55)

Wow!  That's a lot of money for basics.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

evelyn's picture

(post #32449, reply #20 of 55)

this is a very expensive country to live in...frankly I don't know how we make ends meet. If it weren't for parents providing houses for their offspring (part of the old dowry system), things would be well-nigh impossible. Of course, as things stand now, few modern Greeks are able to provide their own children with housing - I know we won't.

 

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
Marcia's picture

(post #32449, reply #21 of 55)

The meat and dried beans in Greece are expensive but other things are pretty comparable to NJ. We do get bananas for less but pay more for apples, for instance.


Perhaps produce is less in Florida because there's less transportation involved. Pretty soon, we'll be able to buy local produce and I surely look forward to that.

Jean's picture

(post #32449, reply #23 of 55)

I had to go get some receipts, DH does the shopping for me now.


Large eggs. $1.29
Bacon         $3.59  Wow! I had no idea.
Bananas     $  .49 a #
Texas red Grapefruit $1.29 each.  Hoo.
8# Idaho Potatoes  $2.99
Store brand saltines $1.39 #
California aparagus  $ 2.99 a #.  Our Easter treat--3# worth!!
Head lettuce  $.99 ea
Green bell pepper $1.19
Gala apples $1.69 a #




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Gretchen's picture

(post #32449, reply #26 of 55)

How ARE you doing?  The thought of my DH doing my grocery shopping makes me think I may never have the knee replacements I really do need!!!  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen