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Green Tomatoes

AJ12754's picture

So this is probably a weird idea but I have all these green tomatoes from clearing out the tomato plants and getting ready for winter.  I don't know what to do with them.  I don't know anything about canning, but I was wondering if these could be roasted and used for a soup of some kind. 

"Truth is the engine of our judicial system." Patrick Fitzgerald

Cave obdurationem cordis

MadMom's picture

(post #33229, reply #1 of 109)

I hate to admit this, being from the south, but I ate my first fried green tomato this month!  It was delicious, and I bought one just to fry, but the blasted thing got ripe on me before I could get around to it.  I think you can bread them and freeze them, but not too sure.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

AJ12754's picture

(post #33229, reply #3 of 109)

Would I just bread them and fry them in olive oil?  Or vegetable oil.  We almost never eat fried food but if they are that good, we'll given them a shot :-)

"Truth is the engine of our judicial system." Patrick Fitzgerald

Cave obdurationem cordis

Gretchen's picture

(post #33229, reply #2 of 109)

You can make green tomato chow chow.


You can slice them and freeze and vac seal for wintertime fried green tomatoes.


Somewhere I read about a roasted green tomato pie.


Gretchen
Gretchen
AJ12754's picture

(post #33229, reply #4 of 109)

Uh oh.  What's chow chow?


And a green tomato pie sounds right up my alley.


"Truth is the engine of our judicial system." Patrick Fitzgerald

Cave obdurationem cordis

evelyn's picture

(post #33229, reply #70 of 109)

Didn't Ma make one (out of desperation - little to eat) in one of the Little House books, and Pa thought it was apple pie?

 

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
AJ12754's picture

(post #33229, reply #71 of 109)

Boy, I don't know -- and all the Little House books we had for my daughters have been shipped off to my niece.  But I bet you're right.

"Truth is the engine of our judicial system." Patrick Fitzgerald

Cave obdurationem cordis

Madeleine's picture

(post #33229, reply #25 of 109)

I read about a green tomato pie also...I think it may have been in paula deen's cookbook.  Sound familiar to anyone?


And I'm very excited about freezing the green tomatoes for later!  Didn't know I could do that.


 


Madeleine
Madeleine
KarenP's picture

(post #33229, reply #5 of 109)

   I don't know what to do with them.  I don't know anything about canning, but I was wondering if these could be roasted and used for a soup of some kind. 


  I have a recipe for a green tomato jam that is very good, not too sweet, that was used for a green tomato crostada and as just a dab on top of pecorino cheese.  Another was pickled in vinegar and layered in a jar with peppers, garlic, and mint. If you're interested I'd be happy to get them for you.

AJ12754's picture

(post #33229, reply #6 of 109)

Those sound delightful -- and I would appreciate the recipes when you have time :-)


Thanks!


"Truth is the engine of our judicial system." Patrick Fitzgerald

Cave obdurationem cordis

Jean's picture

(post #33229, reply #7 of 109)

My Mom used to make a recipe very similar to this one.



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KarenP's picture

(post #33229, reply #8 of 109)

Marmellata di Pomodori Verdi


(Green Tomatoes Jam)


 Marmellata di Pomodori Verdi is made in Calabria and throughout other parts of Italy. It is a great way to use those green tomatoes at the end of the season that would never be eaten. It is great on toast, pecorino cheese or to fill a “crostata” (sweet tart).


  


2 1/2 pounds of green tomatoes


2 cups of sugar


Juice of two lemons


Grated peel of one lemon


  


1. Rinse the tomatoes. Remove core and cut into 3/4-inch cubes.


 


2. Place the chopped tomatoes in a heavy bottom pot. Add the sugar, lemon juice and lemon peel. Stir well to mix and bring to a boil over medium heat. Stir to prevent sticking at the bottom of the pot.


 


3. Cook for about one hour until thick or thermometer reads about 220 F.


 


4. Remove from heat and let rest for 5 minutes. Place the jam in clean canning jars (jelly type). Close with a lid and ring, and boil in a water bath for 10 minutes.


 


5. Remove the jars from the water bath and allow to cool. The jars should seal as they cool.


  


Copyright 2005, Rosetta Costantino. All rights reserved.


 


Crostata di Pomodori Verdi


(Sweet tart with homemade green tomato jam)


 


Crostata means “tart” in Italian. It is usually a simple tart made at home with a filling of homemade jam. The crust is made with pasta frolla, a sweet tender dough that is used in Italy for tarts and cookies. The dough can be made by hand or using a food processor. Because of the amount of sugar it is an easy dough to make and less likely to become overworked.


You can make this crostata in a fluted tart pan with a removable bottom, or just roll the dough out in a rectangular or round shape on a cookie sheet and fold the edges over to form a rim to hold in the jam.


 


Pasta Frolla (Sweet Tart dough)


3 1/2 cups flour


1 cup sugar


1 teaspoon baking powder


Pinch of salt


1 cup butter (8 ounces), melted and cooled


2 eggs, beaten


Grated peel of one lemon


 


2 cups Green Tomato jam (Recipe follows)


  


1. Place the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a mound, make a well in the center and add the butter, eggs and lemon peel. Mix with your hands and knead well for few minutes until you have smooth dough. This can also be done in a food processor by first pulsing the dry ingredients together, then adding the butter, eggs and lemon peel, and pulsing again just until the dough starts to come together. Divide the dough in two portions, one slightly larger than the other one (about 1/3 and 2/3 portions). Flatten and pat the portions of dough into two thick rectangles.


 


2. Cover the dough with plastic wrap and let rest in the refrigerator for one hour. The dough can be made ahead and kept refrigerated for a day or frozen for later use.


 


3. Preheat oven to 375 F.


 


4. Lightly butter a baking sheet (9 by 13 inch) and dust it with flour. Take the larger portion of dough out of the refrigerator and place it between two sheets of plastic wrap or wax paper. Roll it into in a rectangular shape about 3/8-inch thick and about 1/2-inch larger than the baking sheet. Peel off the top sheet of plastic wrap; turn the dough over onto the baking sheet and remove the second sheet of plastic wrap. The dough should come up the side of the baking sheet about 1/2-inch.


 


5. Spread the jam about 1/2-inch thick over the dough, leaving a ‘/2-inch border uncovered with jam, around the sides of the pan.


6.   Roll out the second portion of dough to a thickness of 3/8 of an inch and cut into 1/2-inch wide strips with a fluted cutter or a sharp knife. Place these strips directly over the tart in a lattice-work pattern, criss-crossing the surface of the tart from edge to edge, leaving diamond-shaped spaces where they cross.


 


7.   Fold the edges of dough from the sides of the baking sheet over the ends of the lattice and seal them to make a border all around the tart.


 


8.   Bake in the pre-heated oven for 25 to 30 minutes until the lattice is golden brown.


 


9.   Optionally, when the crostata comes out of the oven, it can be brushed with a simple glaze made by melting some jam with a small amount of brandy. This is not typically done in Italy, but the glaze does make for a nice presentation.


  


Copyright 2005, Rosetta Costantino. All rights reserved.


  


Pomodori Verdi Sott’Olio


(Green tomatoes preserved in oil with hot peppers, mint, and garlic)


 5 pounds green tomatoes


2 ounces Kosher salt


4 cups white wine vinegar


1/4 cup fresh mint, chopped


5 cloves fresh garlic, sliced crosswise


4 fresh peperoncini (hot chili peppers) or to taste, sliced crosswise


Extra virgin olive oil


 


1.  Slice the tomatoes into 1/4 inch thick slices.


 


2.  Place the sliced tomatoes in a large non-reactive colander and sprinkle each layer with salt. Keep on layering and sprinkling with salt until all the tomato slices are used up. Place a weight over the tomatoes and let them sit in the colander for 24 hours to draw out the water. After 24 hours, gently squeeze any excess water out of the tomatoes with your hands. In a heavy pot (4 qt) add the 4 cups of vinegar and 2 cups of water and bring to boil. Add the tomato slices and cook for approximately I to 2 minutes until tender but not overcooked.


 


3.  Drain the tomato slices and place in a large colander. Apply a heavy weight to squeeze out all the liquid. A heavy pot smaller than the colander, filled with water, works well. Let the tomato slices drain with the weight for 15 minutes or until cool enough to handle.


 


5.  Place the tomato slices on top of a table covered with a kitchen cloth and spread them apart over the cloth. Let them dry for 24 hours or more if needed. The tomatoes should look dry but still feel damp to the touch.


 


6.  Place a layer of the tomato slices in a wide pickling jar and sprinkle with the mint, sliced garlic, peperoncino and drizzle with olive oil. Continue this layering process until all the tomato slices are used. As you add more layers of tomatoes, press them down on top of each other. Place a weight on top of the tomatoe slices ensure that they are completely covered by the oil. (a water-filled jar works well for this)


 


7.  It is advised to store the preserved tomatoes in the refrigerator. The weight can be removed and the jar covered and placed in the refrigerator. When refrigerating just remember to take them out an hour before you plan to serve them to allow the oil to re­liquefy.


 


Makes about two pints.


  


Copyright 2005, Rosetta Costantino. All rights reserved.



Aberwacky's picture

(post #33229, reply #13 of 109)

Thanks for the recipe!  Canned up a bunch of green tomato pickles and mixed vegetable pickles this weekend, but I have a bunch of green ones left in the garden, since the freeze that was expected didn't hit (I hedged my bets and left half of the green ones on the vines).


I'll be sure to make some of the jam with the next pre-freeze pickings.


Leigh


How is it that we put man on the moon before we figured out it would be a good idea to put wheels on luggage?

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
KarenP's picture

(post #33229, reply #26 of 109)

  I hope that you'll enjoy them as much as I do. 

MadMom's picture

(post #33229, reply #14 of 109)

Oooh, that sounds good...might have to buy some green tomatoes just to do that, LOL.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

AJ12754's picture

(post #33229, reply #27 of 109)

I am going to make this jam today and I just want to make sure I understand the canninng part.


Do I close the jars lightly or tightly before I place them in the water bath -- I was at a friend's house several years ago while she was canning and I seem to recall that she tightened the jars after the water bath but I could be wrong about that.  And I seem to recall that she was really careful about making sure the rim of the jar was dry.


Also, should the water be at a full boil before I put the jars in and cook for 10 minutes?


Sorry to be so clueless but the alternative is botulism so I thought I'd better ask.


"Truth is the engine of our judicial system." Patrick Fitzgerald

Cave obdurationem cordis

Aberwacky's picture

(post #33229, reply #28 of 109)

Here's the basic process:



  • Put water in your canning pot so that it will be at least one inch above the top of the jars when added to the pot and turn on the burners.  (I start with hot water to speed up the process).

  • Heat your lids and rings in hot water (simmering a little is okay). This softens the seal on the lids.

  • Fill the jars and leave 1/4" of headspace between the jam and the rim--the jars will be hot from the hot filling. 

  • Wipe the rim with a clean damp cloth to remove any jam that may have gotten on there.

  • Put the lid on, and then the ring.  Tighten it down finger-tight--pretty snugly, but don't wrench it on.

  • Place the jars in the simmering water in the water bath--it doesn't have to be at a hard boil.  Put the lid on the canner.

  • Let the water return to a hard simmer/low boil, and start your timer for 10 minutes.  At the end of 10 minutes, turn the burner off and leave it for 5 minutes, then remove the jars and place them on a clean towel to cool (I use a cookie-cooling rack set on a towel). 

  • DON'T retighten the lids after removing the jars from the water bath. 

  • Soon you'll hear the reassuring pops of the lids sealing.  After a few hours, you can check the lids to make sure they're sealed--they should be indented firmly. 

  • When the jars are fully cooled, remove the rings, rinse the jars to get rid of any jam that may have leaked out during the sealing, and store in a cool, dry place.

I hope this helps. Feel free to ask any more questions as you go along!


Leigh


Cooking is messy.  Deal with it or stay out of the kitchen.

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
AJ12754's picture

(post #33229, reply #47 of 109)

Well -- my first canning project is complete and I am the proud possessor of two 8 oz. jars if green tomato jelly.


The canning itself went very smoothly (although I wish I had not tried to do it the same day I ballanced my checkbook!) but I think I screwed up the jelly -- I cooked it for over an hour until it was thick and syrupy but I couldn't seem to get it to the 220 degrees the recipe called for -- so I upped the heat (since I was running late for an appointment) and ended up burning the bottom of the pan a bit and the green jelly started to turn very dark. I canned it anyway and I plan to try it as part of the green tomato tart posted in this thread.


I will definitely be doing more of this -- and thanks so much for your help!


"Truth is the engine of our judicial system." Patrick Fitzgerald

Cave obdurationem cordis

KarenP's picture

(post #33229, reply #48 of 109)

  Bravo!  Bravisimo!  Congratulations!
  Fun, isn't it?

AJ12754's picture

(post #33229, reply #49 of 109)

Thank You!


(bowing and blushing)


And yes -- it was fun and I loved the wonderful aroma as the tomatoes were cooking.


"Truth is the engine of our judicial system." Patrick Fitzgerald


Edited 10/24/2006 8:23 am ET by aj12754

Cave obdurationem cordis

Aberwacky's picture

(post #33229, reply #50 of 109)

Congratulations!


I was wondering how it went--thanks for the report.  Now that you've got that under your belt, the next time you'll have even more confidence.


Enjoy your jam.


Leigh


Cooking is messy.  Deal with it or stay out of the kitchen.

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
AJ12754's picture

(post #33229, reply #51 of 109)

Thanks for all the help -- I am looking forward to trying it again soon.  It was fun :-)

"Truth is the engine of our judicial system." Patrick Fitzgerald

Cave obdurationem cordis

Adele's picture

(post #33229, reply #52 of 109)

WTG^5!   Wasn't it fun?  Just wait until you have a couple of different things canned & you open the cupboard- it's just so satisfying! 


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

AJ12754's picture

(post #33229, reply #54 of 109)

It was really fun :-)


I was think of opening one tonight -- smearing some in a samll puff pastry shell and topping with some goat cheese and heating it up.


I pretty much can't wait any longer to try it.


"Truth is the engine of our judicial system." Patrick Fitzgerald

Cave obdurationem cordis

Wolvie's picture

(post #33229, reply #53 of 109)

great! fun stuff, fab end result - even if it is browned, I bet it's okay. :-)

 


I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts. - Will Rogers

 

AJ12754's picture

(post #33229, reply #55 of 109)

even if it is browned, I bet it's okay. :-)


I hope you are right!


"Truth is the engine of our judicial system." Patrick Fitzgerald

Cave obdurationem cordis

SallyBR1's picture

(post #33229, reply #56 of 109)

ok, allow me to settle a domestic discussion.

We have two large bowls of green cherry tomatoes - with the fear of a frost, we pretty much harvested everything from our two plants

they are in the bowl - hubby says they will turn red with time if we place them in a warm, sunny spot

Is hubby right? Is hubby wrong?

How long should wife wait before losing control and making some kind of a green tomato extravaganza????

 


 


"Her shimmyshaky is much better than her chimichurri"
(Glenys, June 2006)

MadMom's picture

(post #33229, reply #57 of 109)

I would assume they would ripen, but then you would have the equivalent of store-bought-ripened-in-the-truck tomatos, wouldn't you?  I'd make something that calls for green tomatoes.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

SallyBR1's picture

(post #33229, reply #58 of 109)

Soooo, should I understand that you are siding with hubby, not with me?????

:-)

 


 


"Her shimmyshaky is much better than her chimichurri"
(Glenys, June 2006)

MadMom's picture

(post #33229, reply #62 of 109)

I'm with you all the way, baby, if I understand your post.  Don't wait for them to ripen.  Make something with green tomatoes NOW.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

SallyBR1's picture

(post #33229, reply #63 of 109)

Well, I was hoping more for a

"OF COURSE THEY WON'T RIPEN OUTSIDE THE PLANT"

:-(

 


 


"Her shimmyshaky is much better than her chimichurri"
(Glenys, June 2006)