NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Great recipe - made for party on Sunday.

MEANCHEF's picture

Ponzu Salmon The ponzu sauce from this recipe is fantastic on any seafood. The sauce recipe makes 1 cup

4 (8 
 
ounce)  salmon fillet, skin removed

1
 
teaspoon fine sea salt

2
 
tablespoons vegetable oil



Northwest Ponzu Sauce

1
 
 grapefruits

1
 
 orange

1
 
 lime

1/4
 
cup sugar

1/4
 
cup soy sauce

1/4
 
cup rice vinegar

1.
For the sauce:.

2.
Use a zester to remove the colorful outer rind from the grapefruit, the orange and the lime; save the zest on the side.

3.
If you don't have a zester, use a vegetable peeler to remove the rind, then cut it into julienne strips with a sharp knife.

4.
Juice the fruits and combine the juices.

5.
Put the sugar in a dry pan over medium-high heat and swirl the pan until the sugar has begun to dissolve; it will be caramel-colored.

6.
Pour in the fruit juice and step back because the mixture will boil and steam rapidly before settling into a steady boil.

7.
Boil for about 2 minutes, swirling the pan now and then to dissolve the caramelized sugar.

8.
When the caramelized sugar has dissolved, add the soy sauce and vinegar.

9.
Drop in half of the citrus zest that was set aside before the fruits were juiced and continue boiling the sauce for 2 or 3 minutes, or until it is slightly thickened.

10.
The zest may be left in or strained out.

11.
Serve the sauce warm or at room temperature.

12.
For the Salmon: Rinse the salmon fillets, pat them dry and sprinkle with the sea salt.

13.
Put a large, nonstick skillet over medium-high heat and allow the pan to preheat for 1 minute.

14.
Put the oil in the pan; it should be almost smoking-hot.

15.
Put the salmon skinned-side-up into the pan and allow the salmon to cook undisturbed for 4 to 5 minutes or until a crisp brown crust has formed on the underside of the fish.

16.
Turn the fillets and cook 5 minutes longer or until fish is just cooked through.

17.
Make a puddle of ponzu sauce in the center of four plates and plant the pan-seared fish fillets on top.

18.
Garnish the fish with reserved zest from a grapefruit, an orange and a lime.

Jangomango's picture

(post #27769, reply #1 of 52)

Yep. This is great. We had it last night.

When I juiced the citrus , I had 1 1/2 cups and it seemed too much for the quantity of sugar. So I just used 1 cup in the sauce (drank the rest...)

1 cup is perfect.

Wolvie's picture

(post #27769, reply #2 of 52)

Agree. I've made this or this recipe's sister several times.  I love the combo of citrus . Got hooked on that from Ming.


Edited for spelling - need java.



Nothing valuable can be lost by taking time - Abe Lincoln.


Edited 5/28/2003 6:06:24 AM ET by Wolvie

 

Jangomango's picture

(post #27769, reply #3 of 52)

Yes - I notice that in Ming's book there is a grilled snapper which starts with a marinade with ponzu /soy / ginger and sesame oil. Sounds yummy. I'm going to try it with my leftover ponzu.

(Is it ponzu sauce or just ponzu - adjective or noun?)

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #27769, reply #4 of 52)

This Ponzu is very different than the Japanese versions - no nasty fish flakes nor kelp.

PeterDurand's picture

(post #27769, reply #6 of 52)

fish flakes and kelp (dry or wet) are GOOD.

Wolvie's picture

(post #27769, reply #7 of 52)

no fish flakes or kelp in the one from Ming, either, as I remember.


I've use ponzu for lots of  things, that combo of the citrus and soy is great.


Aussie you really should should make some of Mings Lime Soy Glaze - excellent stuff!


Nothing valuable can be lost by taking time - Abe Lincoln.

 

Fledge's picture

(post #27769, reply #8 of 52)

I think Wolvie has the hots for Ming.

 

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

MadMom's picture

(post #27769, reply #9 of 52)

Hey, Ming is a hottie...cannot imagine anyone not having the hots for him!

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

Fledge's picture

(post #27769, reply #10 of 52)

Not much for pretty boys...


Signed,


Someone


 

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

ehBeth's picture

(post #27769, reply #12 of 52)

Ming is ... Ming is ...


 


 


 


<thud>


 


sorry, i slipped on my drool.


<sigh>


If you can't play a sport, be one.
If you can't play a sport, be one.
Jangomango's picture

(post #27769, reply #13 of 52)

DDG, one presumes. 

Wolvie's picture

(post #27769, reply #11 of 52)

I'm certainly impressed by his skill in the kitchen! ;-)


It doesn't hurt that he is cute, tho.


Nothing valuable can be lost by taking time - Abe Lincoln.

 

MadMom's picture

(post #27769, reply #5 of 52)

Meanie, this sounded so good.  Don't have any salmon on hand (surprise!) but do have some mahi, and I thought this would also be good with mahi, so picked up the fruit I needed today at Central Market and this will be on our menu tonight.  Thanks for posting.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

Tuck's picture

(post #27769, reply #14 of 52)

This looks great MC.  Thanks for the recipe - will give it a try next week.


~tuck
“A good dish is like a piece of music. It needs harmony, but, most of all, it must have clarity.”

Gretchen's picture

(post #27769, reply #15 of 52)

I made this the other night. It is delicious.  Husband REALLY liked the sauce.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Ballottine's picture

(post #27769, reply #16 of 52)

Took your Ponzu sauce to a potluck brunch yesterday and served with roasted salmon. It was a great success.

Very little was left over, and a friend asked if he could take it home to dunk bread in it. I thought it was weird, but let him take it.

Thank you so much for posting.

Could you tell me more about the sauce...where does it come from? Bal

 

So much to cook; so little time.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #27769, reply #17 of 52)

Ponzu is traditionally Japanese, but this particular recipe is from a Seattle chef - an americanized version.

Ballottine's picture

(post #27769, reply #18 of 52)

Would you by any chance be that chef?

Whoever created it did GOOD. However, now I have a problem.

As I mentioned in another post I've been asked to do dinner for 50. I thought of making my "6 foot salmon." I actally have a five and half foot board that I cover with several layers of butcher's paper, line it up with doillies, than place several identical in width poached salmon fillets on top, stuffed with something, (more often than not with duxells,) and than cover with a sauce -- either green herb/ or whipped cream with mustard and than cover with cucumber slices, etc. I also make tomato roses and herb garlands on the sides. It looks and tastes good.

The salmon fillets are poached the night before and refrigerated, the salmon is dresed in the last minute by two or three people, so it works.

One of my firends, who had Ponzu sauce yesterday, convinced everyone that this is the way to go. How am I going to present salmon with the Ponzu sauce? Do I ditch cukes? I need them to make salmon fillets look whole. HELP! Bal.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

Wolvie's picture

(post #27769, reply #19 of 52)

too funny!


I'm betting it was Tom Douglas, he does a lot with asian / american stuff.


Nothing valuable can be lost by taking time - Abe Lincoln.

 

NancyDuncan's picture

(post #27769, reply #36 of 52)

Just wanted to say I tried your Ponzu sauce with salmon today, and husband thought it was GREAT!  He is so picky about fish, it has to be just so, not too much frou frou on it.  He actually said, "This would be great for company."  From him, unusual praise.  Thanks again for posting this recipe.

Gardening and cooking at the corner of the Pacific Ocean and Canada, zone 7

Gardening and cooking in the Pacific Northwest, zone 7
MEANCHEF's picture

(post #27769, reply #37 of 52)

I am glad you liked it.  Are you from the PNW?

NancyDuncan's picture

(post #27769, reply #40 of 52)

You asked was I from the PNW - answer, well, sort of.  We live here now, and hubby is from here since he was 13.  We've lived all over but have decided to settle here as of about 10 years ago and think this is the best climate we've ever lived in.

Gardening and cooking at the corner of the Pacific Ocean and Canada, zone 7

Gardening and cooking in the Pacific Northwest, zone 7
MEANCHEF's picture

(post #27769, reply #20 of 52)

No it wasn't me.  It was a chef who you have never heard of - the restaurant is called Ponti's.


I am not sure how much the sauce would cover up your patchwork salmon.  Could you not serve it on the side?

ashleyd's picture

(post #27769, reply #21 of 52)

The sauce is used to cover up the fact that this is not one huge salmon but a patchwork of smaller fish. Serving it on the side rather misses the point!

If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion and avoid the people, you might better stay home.
--James Michener

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

anneelsberry's picture

(post #27769, reply #22 of 52)

Was thinking about buying salmon this morning at the market when I noticed that it now has a tag on it saying "artificially colored" or some such thing. Then I saw this article by Marion Burros in the NYTimes, http://www.nytimes.com/2003/05/28/dining/28WELL.html

Now I've known intellectually that farmed salmon was "colored" for some time. But somehow knowing exactly how has turned me off it.

Good thing I'm going up to my family's in Alaska this summer.

Somebody put a stop payment on my reality check!

Somebody put a stop payment on my reality check!

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #27769, reply #23 of 52)

I almost bought some salmon recently, until I noticed the "color added" label.


bleah.


~RuthAnn

~RuthAnn

Gretchen's picture

(post #27769, reply #29 of 52)

I believe the color added is beet powder in the feed--or some such.  Farmed salmon is an unappetizing gray color because they are not eating krill and such.

Gretchen

Gretchen
iguana667's picture

(post #27769, reply #31 of 52)

For farmed salmon, they feed them astaxanthin, which is from red algae, to make them salmon-colored-- as you said, making up for the krill they don't get in the wild. Astaxanthin is related to the carotenoids that make carrots orange and tomatoes red, so it's not a bad additive. However, I think there is also some dye added to salmon fillets during processing-- if it were part of the feed, they wouldn't have to fess up to it on the label. Some of those dyed fillets look nasty.

MarieLouise's picture

(post #27769, reply #27 of 52)

Yes. The picture of the "paint" chips really says it all, doesn't it?

The older I get, the less I want someone altering my food. I'm really turning rather militant about only eating organic, unprocessed food. Maybe it is merely the ways they have to alter our food are getting scarier and scarier...

Gretchen's picture

(post #27769, reply #28 of 52)

Then I saw this article by Marion Burros in the NYTimes


She was on Diane Rehm's show yesterday and touched on that--AND everything else in the market that might kill us!  Today on Diane Rehm she is going to talk about the situation with overfishing and fish farming.


Gretchen
Gretchen