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Glenys's chicken with figs and honey

Gretchen's picture

I promise to not post about this again but I have to in the interest of any who have never made this absolutely wonderful recipe. Made it last night with prunes and it was equally as good. Well, I might like the figs better, but still so good.  Thanks Glenys.

Gretchen

Gretchen
chiquiNO's picture

(post #36399, reply #1 of 67)

It's on my list to try!!

Chiqui from way down yonder in New Orleans

 

suz's picture

(post #36399, reply #2 of 67)

I'm not familiar with this recipe, but it sounds like something I would like.  Where can I find the recipe.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #36399, reply #3 of 67)

Chicken with Honey, Figs and Herbs

Dried Mission figs are a staple in my cupboard. Supermarkets carry them and stores with organic selections carry the unsulphured ones. Marinating and roasting them with the chicken plumps them into a juicy condiment. The combination of the marinade and boning technique creates an oven-grilled bird with a crispy mahogany skin that cooks in half the time.

1 chicken, preferably free-range, approximately 3 lbs.. (1.3 kg)

1 bulb roasted garlic or 5-6 cloves fresh garlic, minced

1 Tbsp. dried herbes de Provençe

1/4 cup fruity olive oil

1/4 cup balsamic or red wine vinegar 60 ml

2-3 sprigs each fresh thyme and rosemary 2-3

1/2 cup honey 120 ml

2 cups white wine 475 ml

8 oz. dried Mission figs, about 12- 16 225 gr

1 tsp. kosher or pickling salt 5 ml

freshly ground pepper

Prepare the chicken (or ask your butcher to do it). If doing it yourself, place the bird breast side down and cut alongside the backbone to the neck with sharp shears, using the widest
point of the tail as a guide to position the scissors.
Once the backbone is removed, give the top of the breast bone a gentle chop with a knife.
The bone may be removed completely, but cracking it will allow the bird to be flattened.
Skin side up, press down on the centre of the breast and the bird will flatten.
The chicken should marinate for several hours or overnight for best flavour. A resealable plastic bag or shallow dish is excellent for marinating and turning the chicken. Whisk together the fresh garlic,
(or add the roasted garlic to the pot), herbes de Provençe, olive oil, vinegar, honey and wine and add the fresh herb sprigs. Place the chicken and figs in the marinade and refrigerate, turning frequently.

To roast, preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C). Choose a pan the will hold the chicken snugly.
A ten inch frying pan is excellent. Place the figs and herb sprigs in the bottom of the pan.
Place the chicken on top and pour the marinade over all. Season with sprinkled salt and pepper.
Roast for 15 minutes and reduce the heat to 350°F (175°C). After a total of 45 minutes,
check for doneness. A simple test is is to push a sharp paring knife through the thickest part of the leg and thigh. If the knife slides through like butter and is very hot to the back of the hand, the bird is done. If there is any resistance, the bird is not cooked.
Remove the bird and the figs from the pan and keep warm. Discard the herb sprigs.figs warm. Degrease the sauce if necessary, using a gravy separator. Return the sauce to the pan and boil to reduce and thicken slightly.
Carve the chicken serve with the figs and sauce.

"Her green thumb was so black, she couldn't even grow zucchini"



(Glenys, August 2008).
suz's picture

(post #36399, reply #4 of 67)

Thank you Sally this looks great.  I'm curious if you used the red wine vinegar or the balsamic as I think it might change the flavor of the dish.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #36399, reply #5 of 67)

I am terribly, terribly ashamed to confess that I have not made this recipe yet - it is yet another one in my files for "to try right away"

(sigh)

"Her green thumb was so black, she couldn't even grow zucchini"



(Glenys, August 2008).
Gretchen's picture

(post #36399, reply #6 of 67)

I use balsamic and don't roast the garlic.

Gretchen

Gretchen
suz's picture

(post #36399, reply #7 of 67)

Thanks Gretchen.

Englishmaid's picture

(post #36399, reply #19 of 67)

I earmarked this recipe for a dinner party this Saturday. I happily assembled it on Friday and let it sit in the fridge marinating - I even bought some fresh figs to roast and present as a garnish . As I was popping it into the oven I realised that I had made it with dates . I considered fishing them all out and then had a ' Oh s*d it ' moment and roasted as directed. It was delish !! Of course I don't know what it should taste like, but I can recommend dates if figs are unavailable. My husband has even turned down roast lamb today in favour of finishing up 'that chicken ' . I sieved the sauce and skimmed it and it was lusious !! Yum Yum .

Gretchen's picture

(post #36399, reply #20 of 67)

I have made it with apricots, and this week with prunes. It is JUST plain GOOD!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
Glenys's picture

(post #36399, reply #21 of 67)

Besides loving Mission figs, it's one dish that's not all mushroomy and dark combining red wine and chicken.

Gretchen's picture

(post #36399, reply #22 of 67)

It is just so rich in flavor--and, of course, all you said too!!  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
dorcast's picture

(post #36399, reply #23 of 67)

I marinated this last night, so am about to put it in the oven. But, am truly not hungry (a rarity). If I am roasting it tonight, but won't eat it until tomorrow, what is the best thing to do? Cook a shorter time and finish tomorrow?
I have deep fear of dry chicken.
And have you ever tried this with boneless, skinless breasts or thighs? I know it's blasphemy,
as to me the skin is the best part, but I am trying to thing of a good make ahead dish for a group and thought it might be easier to serve.

Thanks!!

Glenys's picture

(post #36399, reply #24 of 67)

You can certainly make this with pieces but as with all braised dishes, if you go boneless, skinless breasts, they'll be pasty, although most people think that's how they are anyway. Boned thighs are always an option but most of the time I make it with bone-in thighs and breasts, cutting the breasts into two fat chunks each side.

dorcast's picture

(post #36399, reply #25 of 67)

Thanks!
Boneless chicken breasts do bore me. I'll probably stick with bone in thighs.

Gretchen's picture

(post #36399, reply #26 of 67)

We had leftovers that were as good as the first serving, so I'd do it all the way. I don't think Glenys answered this part.

Gretchen

Gretchen
dorcast's picture

(post #36399, reply #27 of 67)

Thanks.
I made it last year, but your posting reminded me of how much I loved it.

BarbaraK's picture

(post #36399, reply #8 of 67)

Glenys pointed me to it when I was in need of a good make-ahead chicken dish for Rosh Hashanah.  It was a wild success, and has become a standard dish for our big Rosh Hashanah dinner ever since.  It's wonderful!

Gretchen's picture

(post #36399, reply #9 of 67)

I have even made it with apricots!! What I had on hand, since unlike Glenys's preamble, I DON"T always have figs on hand.  Probably need to work on that!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
BarbaraK's picture

(post #36399, reply #10 of 67)

I should try it with other fruit, but I love the original with the figs so much, it's hard to take the step and try a variation!


There's something lovely about the idea of a home always stocked with figs.... Rather belongs in a Laurie Colwin novel!


 

soupereasy's picture

(post #36399, reply #15 of 67)

As you seem to be our font of knowledge on this recipe. Do you think I could do it with dried dates? Too sweet?


I have made it several times with figs, but thought I might save myself a trip to WF to buy them. Happen to have dates in the pantry.


When you said apricots, they were dried? Have some of those in the pantry as well. Just no figs. :)

dorcast's picture

(post #36399, reply #16 of 67)

Not Gretchen, but I would use the dried apricots before the dates.
I think the dates would be too sweet in this dish.
Do you have prunes? That could work too, like Marbella.


Edited 9/16/2008 7:51 pm ET by Dorcast

soupereasy's picture

(post #36399, reply #17 of 67)

No, prunes would have been the first choice.
If I don't find figs tomorrow I will try the apricots. I thought the dates might be too sweet.
No harm in asking.:)

Gretchen's picture

(post #36399, reply #18 of 67)

Yeah, I agree with Dorcast, I would not use dates. They are really a "different" dried fruit to me. Yes. Dried apricots.  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
nutcakes's picture

(post #36399, reply #28 of 67)

Prunes and/or apricots sounds good. I just don't think I like figs at all (double that sentiment re dates!) I do make a chicken tangine with prunes that I like.


 


....and come to think of it, I do like Fig Balsalmic Vinegar


Edited 10/1/2008 3:53 pm ET by nutcakes

Gretchen's picture

(post #36399, reply #29 of 67)

I think you might not even know what they are, but try it with one of the others. SO good.

Gretchen

Gretchen
nutcakes's picture

(post #36399, reply #31 of 67)

Well, I think I know what they are, but I just have never liked them so I don't try them when I see them for such a long time. I recall they have unpleasant, tiny crunchy seeds. But I may try it once with figs just for the hell of it.

Gretchen's picture

(post #36399, reply #32 of 67)

As I said, it marinates overnight, and then the braise. Yes, the seeds still do crunch. But the prunes were really good too.

Gretchen

Gretchen
nutcakes's picture

(post #36399, reply #33 of 67)

okay, thanks, I think I just find apricots and prunes less sweet and don't have gritty seeds. I will def try it.

Adele's picture

(post #36399, reply #30 of 67)

I bought a Fig Balsamic Vinegar at the Farmer's Market and dipped bread in it for dinner.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

AJ12754's picture

(post #36399, reply #11 of 67)

I made this last winter and it was truly wonderful...I'm planning to make it for my mom when she comes out this winter. Because I like her and she deserves it!

The trouble today is that almost everyone is famous and almost no-one is interesting. (paraphrased Tina Brown)

Cave obdurationem cordis