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Glenys' Banana Bread

BarbaraK's picture

I just made Glenys' banana bread recipe, posted several years ago. It's the BEST banana bread! The ingredients are so simple, but the taste is fantastic! The texture is great -- really nice crust, wonderful crumb -- and the taste! Wow! Thank you! (Get the feeling we like it?!)

cookie1's picture

(post #29382, reply #1 of 23)

I love banana bread. Would you be able to post that recipe?

Cheryl

It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice!

BarbaraK's picture

(post #29382, reply #3 of 23)

I am not very computer literate...let's see whether this works.... I will try to copy Glenys' original posting from 2001... Woo-hoo! It worked!!

"I use a different recipe for muffins but this is my favourite banana bread. When I find the bananas black-ripe, I'll buy lots, mash and freeze them for later use. It' just not the same with under ripe bananas.

The Best Banana Bread

This is the recipe as I baked it at the Tomato. Diane modified it for the book, but the reduced sugar (1/2 cup) may leave it dry. In the original publishing of Tomato Cookbook, they omitted the butter, causing much confusion. Following dear Shirley's method, I add the soda to the buttermilk, which improves the taste (I hate those leaveners) and actually solved a mysterious problem at the cafe with new bakers.

2 very large or 3 medium bananas, black ripe

1/3 cup buttermilk

1 teaspoon baking soda

3/4- 1 cup dark brown sugar

1/2 cup unsalted butter

1 egg

1 1/3 cups flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon vanilla or dark rum (optional)

Mash or purée the bananas and buttermilk until smooth. Add the baking soda and mix.

This activates the baking soda and neutralizes the soda taste.

Cream the brown sugar and butter together until smooth. Beat in the egg.

Add the banana purée and combine. The mixture often appears curdled at this stage.

Add the baking powder to the flour; add gradually to the banana mixture. Stir just enough to combine evenly. Flavour with the extract.

Pour into sprayed or greased pans. Fill the pans 2/3 full for even cooking.

Bake in a preheated 375°F oven until set in the centre. A larger loaf pan will take about 45-50 minutes. Reduce the cooking time for smaller pans.

Use a wooden skewer to test the centre.

Leave in the pans for 10-15 minutes before turning out. Do not leave in the pans as the loaves sweat and become soggy."

cookie1's picture

(post #29382, reply #5 of 23)

Thanks so much! I have some bananas in the freezer. Most of the banana bread recipes call for shortening, and I try to avoid that ingredient.

Cheryl

It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice!

SandyS's picture

(post #29382, reply #14 of 23)

Thanks for your recomendation for the Banana Bread. What is The Tomato Cookbook. I looked it up on Amazon but there was really no information about it.

Thanks

KarenP's picture

(post #29382, reply #15 of 23)

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #29382, reply #16 of 23)

It's a restaurant cookbook, from a place where Glenys used to work. Tomato was the name of the restaurant. I don't remember the exact title of the book.

Debby's picture

(post #29382, reply #19 of 23)

Diane Clement at the Tomato
Author: Diane Clement

SandyS's picture

(post #29382, reply #21 of 23)

Thanks. I'd never heard of her or the cookbook. She must be on Canadian TV.

Looks like some good cookbooks.

MadMom's picture

(post #29382, reply #22 of 23)

You should also look into Glenys' cookbooks, starting with The Girls Who Dish.  I've gotten some great recipes out of there.  The cookbooks were written by a group of eight female chefs in the Vancouver area, and it's interesting to see their different approaches to food.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

StacyD's picture

(post #29382, reply #2 of 23)

Did you use one egg or two eggs for the banana bread?  I saw that Glenys posted two different recipes in the archives - one called for one egg and the other called for 2 eggs. 


Also, how long did you bake your bread and what kind of pan did you use? Thanks! 

BarbaraK's picture

(post #29382, reply #4 of 23)

I used one egg. I used a loaf pan, 8"x4", and baked it for 45 minutes.

It's really exceptional -- I love banana breads, and have made quite a few of them over the years, but this is the best. It is already almost all gone (I made it last night) -- everyone loves it. (I know, you are supposed to let a banana bread sit before eating it! None of that in this case -- the family descended on it while it was still warm. Shameless!)

There is almost a honey-like taste to it, although there's no honey in it. Anyway, it's really good!

StacyD's picture

(post #29382, reply #17 of 23)

Thanks Barbara for clarifying. This looks great and I'm ready to try a new banana bread recipe. I've been using the same one for years.


Speaking of honey, attached is a link for a great Honey Almond Crunch Cake w/ Buttermilk. Everyone in my office raves about it when I bring it in.


Enjoy...


http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_14469,00.html


 

BarbaraK's picture

(post #29382, reply #18 of 23)

Thanks for the suggestion -- the honey cake looks great, AND has my new-found wonderful combination of brown sugar and buttermilk. (OK, the recipe calls for light brown sugar, not dark, but perhaps dark could be substituted?!)

StacyD's picture

(post #29382, reply #23 of 23)

Your welcome. I'm sure you can use dark brown sugar which will make the top layer even crispier - yum.

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #29382, reply #6 of 23)

"I just made Glenys' banana bread recipe, posted several years ago. It's the BEST banana bread!"

I totally agree. I adore this recipe. I've successfully subbed apples and pears for the bananas as well.

BarbaraK's picture

(post #29382, reply #7 of 23)

"I've successfully subbed apples and pears for the bananas as well."

Really?? How? Just chopped up?

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #29382, reply #8 of 23)

I mashed the pears with a fork. The apples I grated with the fine holes on my box grater.

BarbaraK's picture

(post #29382, reply #9 of 23)

Thank you! Sounds great -- I'll try it.

Biscuits's picture

(post #29382, reply #10 of 23)

This is my favorite recipe, too.  The buttermilk and the dark brown sugar really turn this recipe into something special.  And everyone I've ever given the recipe to loves it as well.

Not all who wander are lost....

Ancora Imparo -

BarbaraK's picture

(post #29382, reply #11 of 23)

Aha! Is that it? It tasted almost like a honey cake, even though there is no honey in it.

Biscuits's picture

(post #29382, reply #12 of 23)

This recipe really opened my eyes with regard to using dark brown sugar in baked goods instead of light brown sugar.  I truly thought that the dark brown sugar would be too strong a flavor and would overwhelm other flavors.   Not the case.  Instead, it seems to mellow everything out, and give a richer background to the primary flavors.  Ever since I started making this, I almost exclusively use dark brown sugar in things from pancakes to muffins to chocolate chip cookies to barbeque rubs.


BTW - this recipe makes great little cupcakes/muffins for your little ones, too.  I added about half-cup of finely shredded carrot to it and a handful of toasted chopped pecans and my son and his little school friends inhaled them.


Not all who wander are lost....

Ancora Imparo -

Wolvie's picture

(post #29382, reply #20 of 23)

I made the switch to dark brown sugar years ago. I don't even have the lite in the house. I do have turbinado, but that's a different texture as you know and for different stuff. :-)

"We fed the heart on fantasy...the heart grew brutal on the fare" WB Yeats

 

madnoodle's picture

(post #29382, reply #13 of 23)

Thanks for the reminder.  I am yet another fan of this recipe.

Saskatchewan:  hard to spell; easy to draw.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?