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fix cheesecake

nancylouise's picture

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Help! I followed the recipe from Julia Child's baking book to the letter. The cheesecake rose 3" above the pan and spilled over the side. This is for my daughter's graduation party. It looks awful-- any thoughts on how to fix it,or what I could make in its place.

Sandra_'s picture

(post #25887, reply #1 of 48)

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Can't help you fix a cheesecake, but I can suggest something that's pretty nifty and impressive. Gerard and MC will gag when they read it, but never mind, it's fast, easy, and everybody loves it.

You'll need:
a plain angel-food cake, readily available from any supermarket with an in-house bakery.
a tiny (airline-size) bottle of your favourite liqueur. (Something like Sambucca is perfect. Grand Marnier is also an excellent choice.)
a pint of whipping cream
Cookie crumbs (traditionally, Oreos, but this being Cooks Talk, you may well have some amaretto biscotti lying around. If you do, use them.)
a bamboo skewer

Take the angel food cake and poke holes all over the top of it. Pour the liqueur over it and let it soak for about half-an-hour. Whip the cream to stiff peaks. Slather whipped cream all over the cake, and dust liberally with fine cookie crumbs.

Works every time.

nancylouise's picture

(post #25887, reply #2 of 48)

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Thanks for such a great idea. It sounds like a keeper!!!

Gerard's picture

(post #25887, reply #3 of 48)

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You can't fix it, toss it out or at least toss it aside. Either follow Sandra's instructions or do the cheesecake again.
This time bake it in a water bath to prevent the inflation.

I think you'll do better with the boxed cake, I like choc cake with grand marnier poured into it after baking and cooling. Dip some strawbs in choc and cover the cake with slightly sweetened whip cream, stick the choc strawbs in it.
or..slice the strawbs, pour a nip of grand marnier over it, add a spoonfull sugar and a squeese of lemon. Let it soak for half an hour and serve over the cake, add some grand marnier to the whipped cream too, its far better tasting than cheesecake.

Blaccggghh!

Cheers, Gerard

Cleaver's picture

(post #25887, reply #4 of 48)

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This is rich, but it is good. Cut your cheesecake into tiny bite size pieces. Freeze. Make your favorite choc. cake, but bake it in a LG. cookie sheet. Gently press that into a greased springform pan. Up the bottom and halfway up the sides. Meanwhile make a ganache all the way to the point where you whip it til it's soft. Gently fold in your frozen cheesecake chunks. You can add some toasted pecans or hazelnuts. Dump that into you choc. cake crust. Chill. Optional but very VERY good and very rich; Make a second batch of ganache using a little more cream. Spread ontop. Sprinkle w/ toasted nuts of your choice. Cut when firm. Kind of dump this so it is bumpy and messy looking. This is very good.

I always use the second batch of ganache ontop. Mmmmm!

Cleaver

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #25887, reply #5 of 48)

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Cleaver's solution sounds absolutely fabulous! Very decadent and you will wow your daughter's friends.

You may have beaten the cake batter too much. Incorporating too much air into a cheesecake creates the "souffle" effect. If
i ever
the words "Do not overmix" should apply, it's here. (If they weren't part of the recipe...it was probably a mistaken omission.) I used to sell my cheesecakes and cranked them out regularly. Been a victim of the souffle effect but you can bet, after that incident, I never overbeat again! (Doesn't take a safe to fall on my head...LOL.)

Andrea_'s picture

(post #25887, reply #6 of 48)

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If you have time, make Mean Chef's cheese cake (see archives). It's delicious!!!

Herb's picture

(post #25887, reply #7 of 48)

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Please tell me how to free cheesecake from bottom of springform pan without destrying the cake. I would to give to friends but need the pan bottom.

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25887, reply #8 of 48)

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Use a propane torch. See instructions included in my ricotta cheesecake recipe.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #25887, reply #9 of 48)

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Herb, this was a tip I sent to
i Fine Cooking
that was published.

If you know you are going to transport a cheesecake to another location, do the following or say goodbye to the bottom of your springform pan.

Get a cardboard cake circle the size of your springform pan. If you don't have one the exact size, take a larger one, trace the bottom of your springform onto the cake circle and cut around. Wrap the cake circle with a
i double thickness
of heavy duty aluminum foil. Carefully crimp the edges around the cake circle - make it as round as you can. Snap this
i faux
bottom onto your springform pan and bake as usual. My advice is to keep the cake in the springform pan (tightly covered with foil) until reaching your destination. Keep it in the pan until serving time. As soon as the host or hostess wants to serve the cake, remove the springform, wash it, and put it immediately in your car.

I remembered far too many springform bottoms on the New Jersey Turnpike...

Jean_'s picture

(post #25887, reply #10 of 48)

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Chiff, do you think a circle of parchment on the bottom would work?????

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #25887, reply #11 of 48)

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Jean, your suggestion got me to thinking...but I think a less risky way of transporting a cake would be the foil covered cake circle faux bottom. My concern would be that the cake would not "slide" off the springform bottom and you may be forced to run a knife between the parchment and the springform bottom, risking ruining the bottom of the cake. The cake can be transported and served on the foil covered cake circle.

BTW, you can take a plain old firm CLEAN slice of cardboard and cut it the same way you can a cake circle, then cover with foil.

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25887, reply #12 of 48)

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Besides being unnecessary, because you can just unmold it at home and put it on a cake circle, don't you run the risk of getting bits of foil on the cake when you cut it? And do you want foil coming into contact with food in the first place. In Wa this is a Health Dept. no no.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #25887, reply #13 of 48)

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As a seasoned professional, it may not seem a daunting task to you to transfer a cheesecake (be it small or large) to a cake circle - but for the cooking enthusiast or avid hobbyist...this can be intimidating. I started doing it this way because I had a tough time getting my springform bottoms back from the restaurant where I sold the cakes, and when I traveled to friends' houses, I'd remember them when I was 100 miles from their homes.

The foil I use is industrial strength and I specified heavy-duty when I submitted the tip to FC. If the cake is baked
i today
and served
i tomorrow,
I don't foresee inordinate levels of aluminum permeating the food. Also, it's not an acidic food, i.e. tomato-based, that will react with the foil. The foil covered circle is not intended for long term storage, just a way to hold onto your springform bottom.

Hopefully, there won't be enough of the cheesecake left on the foil circle to act as a deterrent against the hostess transferring it to a storage container (or to wrap snugly in plastic). As for serving, if you carefully insert a cake server or spatula, and don't use something meant for cutting (very sharp) foil bits in the cake are not a problem. There is enough butter in a crushed cooky-based crust to act as a lubricant. The regular wimpy (supermarket) foil wrap will not work as effectively. I get my foil from Costco/Sam's type stores and it is restaurant quality.

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25887, reply #14 of 48)

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OH, you have a crust.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #25887, reply #15 of 48)

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My cheesecakes always have a crust...people seem to love it. On the plain, I use graham crackers; on the marble, I use a marbled-combination of Nilla wafers and Chocolate wafers; on the Chocolate, I use Oreo Cookies; on the Pumpkin Chocolate Swirl, I would use whichever the customer chooses (most lean to the chocolate crust). Also, I work the crust up the sides, not only on the bottom. (People save it for last :)

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25887, reply #16 of 48)

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Mine never have a crust. So there. Just a personal preference. To me crust is only good on the heavy, like a block of cream cheese type which I don't like.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #25887, reply #17 of 48)

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That's because you have never had
i mine,
oh fearless leader :p

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25887, reply #18 of 48)

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Isn't yours the standard cream cheese, sugar, egg and sour cream?

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #25887, reply #19 of 48)

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No sour cream in this puppy.

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25887, reply #20 of 48)

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Just a big hunk of cream cheese? That's the kind on the back of the Philadelphia cream cheese package.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #25887, reply #21 of 48)

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Mean, did you read the recipe? I went nowhere near the Philly package when I made it up...Cream Cheese, eggs, heavy cream, eggs, sugar, corn starch, vanilla, plus any flavoring ingredients. It's sex out of a springform pan.

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25887, reply #22 of 48)

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Maybe they copied it from you. I would get a lawyer.

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25887, reply #23 of 48)

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Chiff did you look at the Philly Cream cheese package? Just curious. I was just having fun with your cheesecake sensitivity. I actually never looked at the package - made that up.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #25887, reply #24 of 48)

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I have never looked at the package for a recipe...just to unwrap the blob of cream cheese. Actually, when I used to make the cakes to sell, I used to buy a 3 lb. block of CC from a wholesaler; the brand was
i Pauly,
I believe. I like the size of cake that 3 lbs. of CC makes - the density, the creaminess - it's just the ideal place to start, in my opinion. I've seen lots of recipes calling for 1 lb. or 2 lbs. of cream cheese. I have never added sour cream, although I've heard people do it. When it comes to cheesecake, I'm looking for a very specific mouthfeel.

As for my cheesecake sensitivity, no offense taken :)

Carolina's picture

(post #25887, reply #25 of 48)

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Something tells me that not only did you hit a nerve here, you stomped that sucker flat! I think you're going to have to grovel big time.

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25887, reply #26 of 48)

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I WAS JOKING, HELLO

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #25887, reply #27 of 48)

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That's it, chamomile all around. And a piece of my cheesecake too :)

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25887, reply #28 of 48)

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BTW I have a great cheesecake recipe if you ever need one.

Jean_'s picture

(post #25887, reply #29 of 48)

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I wonder how many red arrows we can stretch out here? Shall we go for a record?? Anyway, points off for not using a smiley thingie when you're joking! Even one of these will do........;-)

CLS's picture

(post #25887, reply #30 of 48)

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I've been reading these messages about cheesecakes and thought I'd add my two cents on the various problems/questions posted.

1. Souffle effect on the cake could have been cause by several factors. But the best way to avoid it is (a) minimal mixing. I totally agree with the person who said that already. You want absolutely no air in the batter if you can help it. Mix on very low spead for a long time if you must, but keep the speed low. (b) you could have added too many eggs. Check the ingredients list. If it said "large" eggs, don't use extra large - lots of people make that mistake and the result is they have too much egg, which causes lift in a sufficiently hot oven. (c) cook it in a water bath to insulate the batter and allow the heat to cook the cake evenly. Some say this isn't necessary, but frankly, when it comes to cheesecake (one the worlds most perfect desserts) I say better safe than sorry. I cook all my cheesecakes in a water bath - wrap the outside of the pan in foil, place it inside the other pan, pour hot water 2/3 up the sides of the pan, and bake at no more than 325 degrees farenheit. (d) the oven was too hot. In my experience, 350 degrees is too hot for a cheesecake. 325 is a good all purpose temperature - it has to cook longer, but it's worth it. My favorite recipe for Triple-Chocolate cheesecake cooks at 275 degrees in a water bath for about 4 hours.

As far as getting it out of the pan successfully - I have baked them in springform pans and in professional gauge steel cake pans. For the springform, the old standard works the best - round of parchment in the bottom, and after the cake as fully chilled down, dip in hot water and unmold. For the regular pan (my favorite), heat the pan over very LOW heat on your stove, moving the pan around gently to heat on all points, put a cake circle on top of pan, turn over, bang once on the counter, the cake slides out. Put another cake circle on the exposed bottom of the cake and quickly turn over. Works every single time.

Hope these tips help. I make cheesecakes all the time and they never crack or overflow the pan.