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Fish Wrapped in thin slices of potato

Florida2's picture

I got the BA in the mail today and there was an intriguing dish. They thin sliced Yukon golds with a mandoline and then lay them flat slightly overlapped in two columns. Then they put the fish on top of it and then folded the two columns over to encase it--kind of like an en croute with puff pastry, but the potato instead. Then they saute it.


I think it would need some sauce to perk it up, but the potato casing was fascinating. I've never seen anything like that before.


http://www.bonappetit.com/tipstools/tips/2009/03/how_to_wrap_fish_with_potatoes


Edited 2/17/2009 5:59 pm ET by Florida2

papa2's picture

(post #37105, reply #1 of 82)

Have done almost the same with an apple peeler.  One large potato and put it in the old style apple peeler- the kind with a crank and just keep making threads and wrap around the fish or chicken.  (Chicken I finish in the oven.)  Rich

ashleyd's picture

(post #37105, reply #2 of 82)

That has got to be a mighty small fish fillet and very flexible potatoes. I don't see how you will get the potatoes to stick to the fish. The result looks great but I can imagine that it would take several attempts, with potatoes flying everywhere, to get an acceptable result. I'm not brave enough for this.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

MadMom's picture

(post #37105, reply #3 of 82)

Potatoes cut very thin with a mandoline would be perfect for this.  I definitely shall try it the next time we have fish.



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kathymcmo's picture

(post #37105, reply #12 of 82)

You have to be careful with that mandoline though!

avak123's picture

(post #37105, reply #5 of 82)

Give me a break...not brave enough! After seeing some of the beautiful things you pull together, this is a piece of cake for you. As I mentioned in a previous post, this preparation is fabulous with Sea Bass.

The slight crunch of the potato paired with a silky fish...ahhh...delicious! :-)

ashleyd's picture

(post #37105, reply #69 of 82)

Having read some of the, how shall we put it, less than fully successful attempts I think my reticence was well advised! As the thread has developed there has been some useful advice which might tempt me into trying it, namely don't rinse the potatoes, use melted butter, make it on something that you can use to transfer it to the pan and slice the potatoes very thin. There might also be something about the kind of potatoes to use, US and UK potatoes are different and as we have so many choices there are more opportunities to pick the wrong type. I suppose another thing is that if it goes wrong there is no recovery, what you are left with is a piece of pan-fried fish and a few home made chips - not the presentation result we are looking for. Final problem is that you can't really prep it in advance, as Gretchen mentioned the potatoes are going to go brown and you can't do the usual thing of keeping them in water.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.


Edited 2/20/2009 12:21 pm by ashleyd

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Jean's picture

(post #37105, reply #70 of 82)

Just a thought.  The reason you don't rinse them is you don't want to lose that layer of starch, couldn't you replace that with a light coating of flour when you assemble? I think the large fish spatula is the secret though.  The video didn't show Julia turning hers, just the finished product- the crispy bottom side up on presentation. Now Jacques with the grated potatoes just flipped it like a pancake. Not as pretty though.


What was the best thing before sliced bread?



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MadMom's picture

(post #37105, reply #71 of 82)

My attempt was less than fully successful, as Ashley so quaintly points out, but it was about 90%, which isn't bad for a first try.  As I said, parboiling the potatoes is probably a good idea, and using a constant light pressure on the mandoline is also wise, as a couple of the slices seemed a bit thick.  The fish was perfectly cooked, though, and the potatoes were good, didn't seem like potatoes really, just a new and different coating.  I'm definitely going to try it again. 



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

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Jean's picture

(post #37105, reply #72 of 82)

Sounds great, practice makes perfect, eh?


What was the best thing before sliced bread?



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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MadMom's picture

(post #37105, reply #73 of 82)

I agree!  Maybe next time they will be pretty enough for pictures.  The sauce was quite good, BTW, and very simple.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

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FL.Cook's picture

(post #37105, reply #74 of 82)

If you look at the video, she butters a large spatula and puts the potatoes down first (on the spatula), then the fish, then the potatoes.  She then slides the whole thing into the pan.  I'm sure it's not as easy as she does it, but worth a try.

Carole

Carole
avak123's picture

(post #37105, reply #75 of 82)

I feel certian you will succeed in this endeavor! :-)

wonka's picture

(post #37105, reply #8 of 82)

I suspect that there would be alot of swearing in my kitchen if I attempted this. lol

evelyn's picture

(post #37105, reply #22 of 82)

I saw something vaguely similar (but done in a small bouche size) done on Iron Chef. Can't remember the chef, can't remember the episode (it might have been Batali), but he first 'wilted' his paper-thin potato slices in hot oil to make them more flexible. I think the potato slices were wrapped around a shrimp or scallop. Looked yummy and lovely.

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Gretchen's picture

(post #37105, reply #23 of 82)

Oh, yes, I saw that one too. Delicious looking!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
Glenys's picture

(post #37105, reply #24 of 82)

Spiral cutter, one continuous piece.

avak123's picture

(post #37105, reply #4 of 82)

The key is to slice the potato VERY thin. I have frequently seen the presentation used in French cooking, but I did see it start seeing it more and more in the U.S. -- within the last 10 years or so.

I love it with Sea Bass and a light and silky sauce with just a bit of caviar and fresh chives to finish.

Florida2's picture

(post #37105, reply #6 of 82)

Can you give a recipe for the silky sauce you allude to?

avak123's picture

(post #37105, reply #11 of 82)

Baked Chilean Seabass

Use a wide large spatula to keep the potatoes and fish together.

Serves 4

4 - 8 oz, filets of Chilean Seabass
2 large potatoes (trimmed to form 1 1/2 inch round cylinders)
8 oz. fresh green beans
1 cup clarified butter
6 shallots, chopped
6-8 oz white wine
1 cup fish stock
2 cups heavy cream
4 oz. butter
1 bunch chives, finely chopped
2 tsp. each of salmon, sevruga and white fish roe (golden) caviar

Season the sea bass with salt and pepper. Thinly slice the potatoes. Lay potato slices on the sea bass, overlapping by 1/3 inch (the potatoes should resemble fish scales). Place sea bass in a shallow pan with hot clarified butter inside, potato side down. Place in 350°F oven and roast until golden brown. Flip fish over so potatoes are on top. Remove from pan.

Put shallots, wine and fish stock in a saucepan. Reduce until almost dry. Add cream and reduce by half. Whisk in butter. Adjust seasonings. Pass through a fine strainer. Add caviar and chives.

Heat beans in hot water. Drain well and sauté with a little butter, salt and pepper.

Presentation:
Arrange beans in the center of the plate. Spoon sauce around. Place sea bass on top of beans. Garnish with fresh herbs.

Jean's picture

(post #37105, reply #13 of 82)

In her video, I loved the way Julia used that large spatula to arrage the potatoes and fish and then just slid them into the pan.  Neat trick.


What was the best thing before sliced bread?



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
avak123's picture

(post #37105, reply #14 of 82)

What a great reminder to keep it simple!

FL.Cook's picture

(post #37105, reply #31 of 82)

"I love it with Sea Bass and a light and silky sauce with just a bit of caviar and fresh chives to finish."


I love Sea Bas, ditto for caviar and chives!!  Now, please tell me about the light and silky sauce.  I do a lot of fish, but mostly roasted with a compound butter, or maybe a lemon and butter sauce, but this sounds wonderful! 


I did make a Sautéed Halibut with Warm Vinaigrette the other night which was very good, and am willing to share if anyone is interested.  The Halibut was on sale when I hit the fish counter, so I did a quick search when I got home to find a recipe that included what I had on hand.


I am editing this to say, that I just saw your reply to the sauce.  Sorry, I just didn't read long enough!


Carole


Edited 2/18/2009 8:01 pm ET by FL.Cook

Carole
avak123's picture

(post #37105, reply #41 of 82)

It really is a nice dish and really not difficult to prepare. Just make sure you season the fish prior to adding the potato.

schnitzel's picture

(post #37105, reply #7 of 82)

Julia Child & Jacques Pepin: Cooking In Concert

Salmon in a Potato Crust


Jean's picture

(post #37105, reply #9 of 82)

Weren't they fun!! Now I'm hungry.



What was the best thing before sliced bread?



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
schnitzel's picture

(post #37105, reply #16 of 82)

They were great together, so funny. I think the "Cooking in Concert" series was 15 years ago.

soupereasy's picture

(post #37105, reply #30 of 82)

Saw that, loved it! They were so good together. As soon as I saw the recipe I thought of them.

Lee's picture

(post #37105, reply #10 of 82)

I had sea bass in a potato crust at New York City's Le Cirque restaurant years ago when Daniel Boulud was the executive chef.  It was served in a divine Barolo sauce.  I had it again after he opened Restaurant Daniel.  DD gave me his first cookbook, Cooking With Daniel, when it was published in 1993, and the recipe for Crisp Paupiette of Sea Bass In A Barolo Sauce (over a tangle of thinly sliced leeks cooked slowly in butter) is among the recipes included.  He comments in the headnotes that his rendition was inspired by the great Paul Bocuse, who made it with rouget (red mullet).


DD and I worked on this dish together.  It took several attempts, but we finally got it right.  The major difference in technique are that Boulud instructs you to trim the fish so that each fillet is as rectangular as possible and to shape the potatoes (russets) into rectangles, leaving the rounded ends intact, before slicing them paper thin.  The potatoes are tossed with a bit of melted butter and some salt before forming the rectangular "crust."


The potatoes really do stick together and, if they are paper thin, they bend fairly easily.  Boulud instructs you to refrigerate the formed packets.  I don't know if this helps the potatoes to adhere since we followed the instruction.  I notice that BA makes no mention of any fat in which to cook the fish.  Boulud uses butter, and so did we.  The real trick is getting the heat right so that you end up with golden brown, crispy potatoes without overcooking the fish.


I haven't made this in years and, since the sauce (you really need a sauce with this) requires an entire bottle of Barolo, I may not make it any time soon (not with Barolo, anyway), but it's a great dish and I have no doubt but that you are capable of preparing it successfully.  



Edited 2/17/2009 10:37 pm ET by lee

schnitzel's picture

(post #37105, reply #17 of 82)

Boulud's may be the one I remember most. Pretty presentation.
http://www.finestwine.com/Recipes-Daniel-Boulud.html#4

Charlie Palmer did one as well.

Lee's picture

(post #37105, reply #21 of 82)

That's the photo in the cookbook.  I've also made the chicken Grandmere Francine and the guinea hen with morels, favas and fiddlehead ferns, except I used Cornish game hens.  They're all wonderful dishes and not hard to make.  Actually, most of the recipes aren't all that difficult, although the numerous components in some recipes make them time consuming.  I have his second book which focuses on the dishes from Cafe Daniel.  Odd that I've made fewer dishes from it than the first one even though they are simpler to execute.