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"Fall off the bone ribs"

Gretchen's picture

Everyone always seems to say "oh, they're so good. They fall off the bone." Well, I just passed by a show of Steven Raichlen's grilling, serving a lamb rib that had been done on the rotisserie, served with harissa. Looked TERRIFIC.


And I quote "The ribs should be tender but not falling off the bone. They should have some chew to them. That's why we have teeth."


THIS is exactly the way I feel about ribs--I hate it when you take a bite and the whole rib pulls off the entire piece of meat.


Gretchen
Gretchen
wonka's picture

(post #37696, reply #1 of 37)

To each there own, I love them to fall off the bone.

Gretchen's picture

(post #37696, reply #2 of 37)

I cook mine so they are very very tender (just to be clear).  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
mireillec's picture

(post #37696, reply #37 of 37)

So do I. I like when it falls off the bones.

MadMom's picture

(post #37696, reply #3 of 37)

We cooked some a couple of weeks ago, which were tender, but not "falling off the bone."  I happen to be one of those who doesn't like to gnaw on the bone, so they didn't seem as good as usual.  I'm making more for tomorrow.  These will be super tender.



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courgette's picture

(post #37696, reply #4 of 37)

I put a rub on them and wrap in foil and bake at 250 for about 3 hours and they are so yummy. For falling off the bone just bake longer. Then grill and put homemade sauce on. Ohh, now I want some today but steak is on the menu for tonight.


Mo

Gretchen's picture

(post #37696, reply #5 of 37)

I do that also, but they are "tender tender juicy"  by 2-3 hours for me. Then cut into quarters and brown on the grill with sauce. 

Gretchen

Gretchen
MadMom's picture

(post #37696, reply #6 of 37)

Exactly what I do, except I bake at a lower temperature, about 200-215, depending on how much of a hurry I'm in.  I pretty much follow Mean's directions, and they have never let me down.  In fact, we're having ribs today, DD's brother in law is here from Ireland and is spending the weekend with them, so I'm fixing ribs for him.  He laks dem ribs!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

suz's picture

(post #37696, reply #7 of 37)

It's been quite some time since I've made ribs.  I've done the dry rub and low and slow in the oven, finishing on my grill with sauce.  I've never wrapped them in foil while in the oven.  I'm curious as to why you do so.  It's going to be rib time very soon.

Gretchen's picture

(post #37696, reply #8 of 37)

I think it "braises" them a bit--catches the moisture.

Gretchen

Gretchen
courgette's picture

(post #37696, reply #13 of 37)

Because that's what the recipe said to do, and they were the best ribs i'd ever made. So i continued using the method.


Mo

suz's picture

(post #37696, reply #15 of 37)

That's as good a reason as any, lol

leonap's picture

(post #37696, reply #29 of 37)

Someone mentioned ancho chile powder as being smoky. I keep getting ancho and chipotle chile powders mixed up. Which is smokier? Chipotle would be hotter, right?

Gretchen's picture

(post #37696, reply #30 of 37)

Different. One smokier. One hotter.

Gretchen

Gretchen
leonap's picture

(post #37696, reply #32 of 37)

Thanks.

cyalexa's picture

(post #37696, reply #31 of 37)

Chipolte powder is ground smoked jalapenos. It is definately smokier. Ancho powder is made from poblano chilis and is maybe a little hotter but mostly more complex with fruity undertones.

leonap's picture

(post #37696, reply #33 of 37)

I am surprised that poblanos might render a hotter product than jalapenos, but the more complex with fruity undertones makes sense to me. Maybe now I can keep them straight! I'll have to compare them side by side. Thank you!

Lee's picture

(post #37696, reply #34 of 37)

Chipotle chili powder scores considerably higher in Scoville units than ancho chili powder, and canned chipotles in adobo are hotter yet.  Are you thinking of pasillas?  They are also smoky and have a bit more heat than anchos.

cyalexa's picture

(post #37696, reply #35 of 37)

You and leonap are both right. Chipotle powder is hotter than ancho powder. I was hedging - sorry.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #37696, reply #36 of 37)

Close call. LOL

MadMom's picture

(post #37696, reply #9 of 37)

Wrap them in a double layer of foil to let the dry rub get into the meat, usually try to do this the night before.  Then I cook them in the oven for 3 - 4 hours, still wrapped in foil.  I only unwrap them for the final grilling and slathering steps.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Ozark's picture

(post #37696, reply #10 of 37)

Maybe even under the broiler to caramelize the sauce at the end.

 


Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

 

Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

Ozark's picture

(post #37696, reply #11 of 37)

Will still caramelize the surface.

 


Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

 

Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

MadMom's picture

(post #37696, reply #12 of 37)

Perhaps a bit, but they really are tender and definitely "fall off the bone ribs" if you cook them for the whole time.  Served them today, and everyone loved them!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Lee's picture

(post #37696, reply #14 of 37)

IA.  I use Bruce Aidells' dry rub and refrigerate them overnight, put them on a rack in a shallow pan, place a pan of water on the shelf below the pan with the ribs and cook them at 300F until they are tender and the meat is shrinking from the ends of the bones, about 2 hours.  The steam keeps them moist, but they don't end up falling off the bone. Finish them on the grill, brushing with sauce at the end.  They're great.

suz's picture

(post #37696, reply #16 of 37)

Would you share the dry rub you use?

Gretchen's picture

(post #37696, reply #17 of 37)

Not Lee, but I now have a reproducible dry rub and love it. But the principal ingredients (which are from my days of making pulled pork originally) are coarse black pepper, brown sugar and kosher salt. If you really want all the rest I'll be glad to give it, because I finally found the place I wrote down the 17 or so ingredients.


Now, I think the ingredients could really be about 8 = smoked paprika, chile powder, coriander, etc.  It is really pretty good.


Gretchen
Gretchen
suz's picture

(post #37696, reply #18 of 37)

Yes, thank you when you get a chance, no rush as I won't be making ribs for a few weeks yet..so far the list of your ingredients is everything we like...and all I hear are rave reviews about your pulled pork.

Gretchen's picture

(post #37696, reply #19 of 37)

I'll be glad to post the rub--but the pulled pork is what it is whether you do a rub or not, truth be told. It is just a cooking method, and has been done for ages in the south. And I have done it as much with some kind of rub and with no rub and think it makes very little difference --for pulled pork.  I think it (the rub)  has become a "thing" in more recent years, as it became more commonly done at home.


I have said I think rub makes more of a difference on ribs and steaks and such rather than a big ole pork butt.  It does make a nice flavorful crust, but that area is a comparatively small amount of "territory" when you are talking about a 7# piece of pork shoulder.  Just my opinion.


But I'll post. I need to put it in my docs anyway.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Astrid's picture

(post #37696, reply #26 of 37)

I honestly like slow cooked pork, just plain, it is so savory.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
Gretchen's picture

(post #37696, reply #27 of 37)

Absolutely. And for many many years the only thing I put on ours was coarse black pepper, and then evolved to pepper and brown sugar--and now this rub, which I am enjoying putting on LOTS of things.

Gretchen

Gretchen