NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Fabulous chicken cacciatore!

Biscuit's picture

I received a copy of Michael Chiarello's Casual Cooking for Christmas, and have looked through it, but haven't really cooked anything from it until recently.  I really love the guy on Food Network - his food looks delicious.  I was curious, though, if they'd translate from a book to my table as well.


Well - I tried my first recipe from his book Sunday.  And - it is SOOOOOOO good I must share it.  Must.  You all HAVE to try this.  It is delicious, it is quick, it can be made ahead of time, and it has only a few ingredients.  And - it is even better the next day!  I've had lots of chicken cacciatore in my life, but this is my favorite and I don't think I'll ever make it any other way again.


CHICKEN CACCIATORE PRONTO from Michael Chiarello's Casual Cooking


serves 4



  • 1/2 oz. dried porcini

  • 1 c. warm water

  • 8 bone-in chicken thighs, skin on

  • sea salt, preferably gray salt, and freshly ground pepper (I used kosher salt)

  • olive oil

  • 1 tbl. minced garlic

  • 3 tbl. finely minced fresh Italian parsley

  • 3/4 c. tomato puree ***

  • 1 cup chicken stock, or 1/2 c. canned low-sodium chicken broth mixed with 1/2 c. water

***  Michael recommends making your own puree from fresh tomatoes, but if tomatoes aren't in season, to use a good canned tomato and whirr them in a blender to make puree.


In a small bowl, rehydrate the porcini in the warm water for 30 minutes.  Lift the porcini out of the water with a slotted spoon and chop finely.  Strain the liquid through a double thickeness of damp paper towels to catch any grit.  Reserve the porcini and liquid seperately.


Season the chicken with salt and pepper on both sides.  Heat a large skillet over high heat.  Coat with a thin layer of olive oil, then add the chicken, skin side down.  Brown well on the skin side, 8 to 10 minutes, reducing the heat if necessary to keep the chicken from burning.  Turn and cook for about 2 minutes on the second side.  Transfer the chicken to a platter and pour off all but 1 tbl. of the fat in the skillet.  (Biscuit's note:  I had to do this in 2 batches).


Return the skillet to moderate heat and add the garlic.  Cook, stirring, until it starts to color, then add 2 tbl. of the parsley and staute briefly to release its fragrance.  Add the porcini and stir briefly, then add the tomato puree, the stock, and the reserved porcini liquid.  Bring to a simmer, return the chicken, skin side up, to the skillet, cover and reduce the heat to low.  Cook until the chicken is no longer pink at the bone, 20 to 25 minutes. 


Transfer the chicken to a warmed serving platter.  Raise the heat to high and boil the sauce until it thickens, then spoon the sauce over the chicken.  Top with the remaining parsley and serve at once.


**********


I made one little addition to this - I had a bunch of shiitakes that I needed to use, so I sliced them thin, and added them to the dish by sautee-ing them with the garlic.


Also - I made this dish on Sunday morning while I was frosting cupcakes for a party we were going to, cooled, put in the fridge, and reheated it for dinner along with some bow-tie pasta and bread.  It was AMAZING.  We had the leftovers last night for dinner, and it was just as good as the first night. 


 


"I wouldn't shop at Walmart.com if they were the last online retailer on earth and they shipped everything using chocolate chips as packing material. "  - Miss Alli of TWoP

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #32414, reply #1 of 92)

Oh that sounds good!  Thanks for the recipe.  Cacciatori is one of my favorite dinners and it is so easy to prepare. 

Adele's picture

(post #32414, reply #2 of 92)

I've tried a couple of things out of his Casual Cooking with good results each time.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

whatscooking's picture

(post #32414, reply #3 of 92)

I wll try this recipe, it looks great. 


I don't know if his recipe for pasta pomodorini is in that book.  I saw it on TV.  But it is a great little thing to do with a pint or two of grape tomatoes.  They are always "buy one, get one free" at my grocery.  It is delish too.

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Jean's picture

(post #32414, reply #4 of 92)

Here's the pasta pomodorini  recipe link.


http://www.napastyle.com/kitchen/recipes/recipe.jsp?recipe_id=304




Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.  Will Rogers


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Wolvie's picture

(post #32414, reply #17 of 92)

another really simple but very delish treatment for those tomatoes is from one of the "Best American Recipes" books - 2000 or 2001 IIRC. Anyway - you take 2 pints of the tomatoes, put them in a baking dish to just hold them in a single layer. Mix agood bit of  bread crumbs with minced garlic, chopped parsley, grated parm, salt & pepper. Add enough good EVO to make it moist, then sprinkle this mixture all over the top of the tomatoes. Bake at 425F(?? this is from memory) until done - although I usually do the low and slow with this dish, as for roasting other tomatoes. The juice from the tomatoes mixes with the bread crumb topping and turns into heaven. I'll double check the book to correct any mistakes, but the essentials are right.


it makes a great side dish and also goes well over pasta. Didn't check Jean's link, so forgive me if this is a repeat. :-)


 No mans error becomes his own Law; nor obliges him to persist in it


THOMAS HOBBES, Leviathan, part 2, p. 237 (1950).

 

whatscooking's picture

(post #32414, reply #19 of 92)

Like a cherry tomato gratin.  It sounds delicious.

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Heather's picture

(post #32414, reply #32 of 92)

There's a very similar recipe in Seriously Simple by Diane Worthington and I've posted it here before. It is a wonderful summer dish when you have lots of cherry tomatoes in the garden We love it!
I'll see if I can find it.
Edited to add:
23681.12 in reply to 23681.10

My standard cherry tomato sauce is the one from Seriously Simple by Diane Rossen Worthington. It is perfect after a busy day--it is delicious and requires almost no attention.

Roasted Cherry Tomato Sauce

1 1/2 pounds ripe cherry or grape tomatoes, halved
4 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 C fresh French bread crumbs
1/2 C freshly grated Parmesan cheese
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1/4 C olive oil
3/4 pound penne, fusilli or farfallini
1/2 C finely chopped fresh basil

Preheat oven to 400. Put the tomato halves in a large baking dish that can be brought to the table. Mix together the garlic, crumbs, cheese, s & p and spoon over the tomatoes. Drizzle with olive oil.
Roast for 30 to 35 minutes until the mixture is bubbly, browned and slightly thickened. Meanwhile cook the pasta and add to the tomato mixture in the baking dish. Add basil and toss to combine.


Edited 4/13/2006 12:20 pm by Heather

Wolvie's picture

(post #32414, reply #33 of 92)

sounds great!

 No mans error becomes his own Law; nor obliges him to persist in it


THOMAS HOBBES, Leviathan, part 2, p. 237 (1950).

 

ashleyd's picture

(post #32414, reply #5 of 92)

Sounds terrific, but in spite of the fact that there's nothing in it I don't like I have never ever enjoyed a Chicken Cacciatore, and I can't work out why.


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Glenys's picture

(post #32414, reply #6 of 92)

The better versions have dried porcini in them, the lesser are usually a harsh blend of tomatoes and green peppers, which would be understandable.

ashleyd's picture

(post #32414, reply #10 of 92)

I can't recall ever having green peppers in cacciatore, or in the French equivalent  chasseur, it is really chicken with mushroom, maybe a little tomato, but not huge amounts. I'm still baffled.


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #32414, reply #11 of 92)

I agree. Around here, it is usually quite tomato-ey...and terrible, IMO.

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Glenys's picture

(post #32414, reply #14 of 92)

Well then you don't have to fret over a worse version, one a hunter would hang head in shame over.
Like most simple, simple braises, I think it culminates in the best of ingredients, au terroir. In Napa, it's just that.
It's not just a chicken, or a red wine or some tomatoes, it's the sum of all thoughtful assembly of said parts.


Edited 4/13/2006 2:29 am by Glenys

Biscuit's picture

(post #32414, reply #18 of 92)

It's not just a chicken, or a red wine or some tomatoes, it's the sum of all thoughtful assembly of said parts.


Do you remember that pot roast discussion I started a few months back?  I've always KNOWN that (what you said above), but until that pot-roast dish, it was never really completely clear to me.  This cacciatore recipe is another such recipe - simple ingredients, you are tempted to just throw it together, but with a little care and time, it elevates it from a simple throw-together meal, to something sublime.


BTW - to all making this - watch what I said about the parsley.  Michael was clear in his book that parsley is not just a garnish for him, but also an essential flavor component.  You will notice in that recipe he sautes part of the parsley for a minute to bring out the flavor.  That step is a crucial one, so don't skip it or brush by it.  Its the only herbal note in the entire dish, and it's important to the layers of flavor.


"I wouldn't shop at Walmart.com if they were the last online retailer on earth and they shipped everything using chocolate chips as packing material. "  - Miss Alli of TWoP

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

SallyBR1's picture

(post #32414, reply #21 of 92)

... and of course, it HAS to be flat leaf parsley!

:-)

 


 


"The beauty of a Sally is how neatly she can be divided"
(CookiMonster, Dec 2005)

Jillsifer's picture

(post #32414, reply #27 of 92)

I'm ignorant about parsley--I use it now and then but don't really know what I'm doing. Does the flat-leaf stuff have more flavor?

 


 

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

SallyBR1's picture

(post #32414, reply #28 of 92)

It is a totally different animal - I don t even hold the curly parsley in my hands, so I don t risk contaminating my pure body with it

I am crazy about parsley... (as you can see... :-)

Maybe it comes from my Mom - it was her favorite herb.

Italian flat leaf parsley has a wonderful flavor and smell - you can do a "blind test" if you want, getting the curly kind and the real thing.

 


 


"The beauty of a Sally is how neatly she can be divided"
(CookiMonster, Dec 2005)

Jillsifer's picture

(post #32414, reply #30 of 92)

That's VERY funny because my Mother HATES parsley--or thinks she does--so I grew up in a totally parsley-free household. On the other hand, she worked with a few Indian and Sri Lankan doctors and SNARFED up their various potluck contributions. At her retirement party, they finally told her how much parsley was used to flavor their food, so neener, neener on her!


But only in the last few years have I been buying the flat stuff to toss into various salads and so forth (but again, didn't really know what I was doing). I guess I should skip playing with the curly stuff?


When we go out to dinner, my son's favorite trick is to wait until Gra'Mommy goes to the restroom or something, then round up EVERYBODY'S parsley (the curly stuff--garnish, usually) and bury it in several spots on her plate.


 


 

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

annieqst's picture

(post #32414, reply #38 of 92)

"I am crazy about parsley... "


Ha! In second grade our teacher asked us something like what did we or did we not eat on our dinner plates. I said I ate parsley and she said, "No you don't." I said I did; she repeated that I didn't. It was the first time I realized adults don't know everything. I LOVE PARSLEY!

unbaked's picture

(post #32414, reply #40 of 92)

Have you tried it deep fried? I've heard it's wonderful that way, as well. I saw someone's recipe for it somewhere and have wondered ever since.

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

Adele's picture

(post #32414, reply #41 of 92)

Haven't fried parsley, but did sage and it was surprisingly good. 

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

annieqst's picture

(post #32414, reply #42 of 92)

Parsley?!?  Deep fried?!? That sounds like the state fair df snickers! Nope, haven't tried it; hate df anything....except maybe chicken... But then I never eat that either except maybe once every 10 or so years.

unbaked's picture

(post #32414, reply #43 of 92)

I will have to google it, it's been a long time since I've seen it, but I'm quite sure it was done by a celeb chef as an edible garnish for a dish. I remember thinking that it would be something worth trying.


I'm just guessing, but seems to me it was done about the same way shallots and slivered onions are, just wet and dredged in a seasoned flour and fried quickly.

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

Risottogirl's picture

(post #32414, reply #46 of 92)

When you fry parsley, it should be very, very dry or it will splatter dangerously. Normally fried herbs are not breaded or floured or coated in any wayif they are to be used as a garnish.


Fried herbs, fried tomato skin is used often in France as a final garnish.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Wolvie's picture

(post #32414, reply #47 of 92)

...fried tomato skin...


hmmm. I might just have to try that. Then again - maybe not - well - I do end up with plenty of skins when I am canning - so - maybe then. :-)


 No mans error becomes his own Law; nor obliges him to persist in it


THOMAS HOBBES, Leviathan, part 2, p. 237 (1950).

 

Risottogirl's picture

(post #32414, reply #48 of 92)

Do you take the skins off one by one when you are canning :)


It works best if you have a large piece, like the almost-whole skin you might slip off one tomato. Of course you have to blot it as dry as possible. It looks cool and is edible but it doesn't really taste like anything.


Classically,  everything on the plate is supposed to be edible.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Wolvie's picture

(post #32414, reply #49 of 92)

well yes - if I do the blanching thing. No if I use the italian press thingy. ;-)


I think you could tell I was undecided, right? lol


 No mans error becomes his own Law; nor obliges him to persist in it


THOMAS HOBBES, Leviathan, part 2, p. 237 (1950).

 

Risottogirl's picture

(post #32414, reply #50 of 92)

I figured you weren't skinning them individually. I was trying to imply that the skins that are left after the "Italian press thingy" probably won't work quite the same way :)


But you knew that ;)


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Wolvie's picture

(post #32414, reply #51 of 92)

yeah - just me having some fun - too much coffee. ;-)


Off to make appy's for today and tomorrow - have a great Easter!


 No mans error becomes his own Law; nor obliges him to persist in it


THOMAS HOBBES, Leviathan, part 2, p. 237 (1950).

 

shoechick's picture

(post #32414, reply #53 of 92)

Funny you mentioned the deep fried tomato skins.  I was just looking at a Thomas Keller recipe for a Tomato salad that was topped with the Fried Skin, it was the first reference to it that I've seen.  Looks great.  But I'm going to wait until our tomatoes are better.

If Shopping Doesn't Bring you Happiness, You're in the Wrong Store.

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine