NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Dry-Brining Revisited--and a Short Rant

butterscotch's picture

Following Russ Parsons's directions for dry-brining over 3 days, I got a beautiful 10-lb. turkey breast.  It was moist, had a golden, crackly skin, and, as promised, tasted "seasoned down to the bone" but not salty. 


But, in fairness, I have to acknowledge that there are a lot of good ways to cook a turkey.  Many years ago, I followed Julia Child's directions, which involved covering the turkey with cheesecloth and basting with a mixture of melted butter and apricot nectar, and came out with something that tasted just as good as yesterday's turkey and looked even prettier, IIRC.


And now for the rant:  Why do people eat turkey?  It smells yucky, has an unpleasant texture, and always tastes the same (flavorless) no matter how you cook it.  I don't think I'd have liked our Thanksgiving turkey if Thomas Keller or Roger Verge had prepared it.  I took a poll at the end of dinner yesterday, and most of my family agreed they'd prefer salmon next year.  Something to look forward to!

Amy's picture

(post #38153, reply #1 of 55)

I honestly thought I was the only person who thinks that turkey smells yucky. I'm still cleaning the kitchen today, and -- not exaggerating -- the smell has been nauseating me.

butterscotch's picture

(post #38153, reply #3 of 55)

No, Amy, take comfort.  You've got plenty of company.  I've always disliked turkey, and one of the things I dislike most is the way it smells.  I always try to bake something nice, hoping the lovely aroma of yeasty baked goods will cancel out the turkey smell.

Biscuit's picture

(post #38153, reply #28 of 55)

I don't even like ground turkey. I like ground chicken, but ITA with you - it smells weird and has an odd texture.

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

Jillsifer's picture

(post #38153, reply #31 of 55)

I don't even like ground turkey.


Gack! Can't stand the stuff--mouthful of sweat sock!



Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?

  Think not of them, thou hast thy music too



Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

Gretchen's picture

(post #38153, reply #2 of 55)

We eat a whole turkey once a year ONLY.  (I do cook breasts through the yer at times.)  Just for tradition. Like the sandwiches, the day itself and the friends and family gathering.  But also we are white meat eaters, particularly with turkey.


But DS's fried turkey was absolutely succulent--better than my roast.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #38153, reply #4 of 55)

You are not alone. The smell of turkey disgusts me, and I don't cook it. We often have boned and stuffed capon or a couple of roasting chickens done the same way in its stead.

I don't remember feeling this way when I was small, but after years of my MIL's dried out disgusting turkey, I could no longer tolerate the stuff. I cooked it a couple of times, and the smell was offensive, so I started a new tradition.

Gretchen's picture

(post #38153, reply #5 of 55)

Thinking more about the aroma!!  The house smells SO good on T'givning morning. I guess I am not one who dislikes it.  ;o)


Gretchen
Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #38153, reply #6 of 55)

I like all of the other good things, and even go so far as to change them around, too. But you do even more than your share of turkey cooking, which is doubly good of you considering your feelings for the bird. :)

Astrid's picture

(post #38153, reply #8 of 55)

I just remembered a turkey which I larded with bacon. Gave the old bird a touch of class.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson


Edited 11/27/2009 6:46 pm by Astrid

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
Marcia's picture

(post #38153, reply #10 of 55)

I'd say the bacon did that bird a world of good, Astrid. :)

Jean's picture

(post #38153, reply #11 of 55)

What amazes me is how so many people are enamored of leftover turkey.  The only way we like it (and we really LOVE it) is chopped finely, along with some onion and green pepper, dressed with some curry in mayo and mixed with a bunch of chopped salted peanuts. Great as a sandwich spread or on good crackers.


ETA I think I'll try subbing it for chicken in the NE soup factory chicken with rice recipe. That should be very good.



A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need


Edited 11/27/2009 8:15 pm ET by Jean

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Gretchen's picture

(post #38153, reply #12 of 55)

I make "chicken" salad with it often, when I need a lot--and cook a turkey breast.  I like a sliced turkey sandwich--must be ultra thin sliced, however.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #38153, reply #17 of 55)

I could eat leftover stuffing or dressing with cranberry sauce forever. Even like it cold. I make special cranberry sauce for myself with a package of cranberries and about 1 teaspoon of sugar. That's not a typo, and you would not like it. ;-)

My stuffing is a cornbread one with sausage and lots of flavorings. Lately I've been using a chicken sausage by Al Fresco (www.alfrescoallnatural.com). The only flavor I like is the Country Style Breakfast Sausage, but it's the only chicken sausage that I really like. Fully cooked, too, and I recommend it if it's available in your neck of the woods. I wouldn't have expected our local stores to carry it but one does.

MadMom's picture

(post #38153, reply #18 of 55)

Cranberry sauce is such a waste at our holiday table, but every year Willie Ray insists that it be there, and it has to be Ocean Spray, straight from the can.  This year, even he didn't eat it!  Said he didn't see it.  I'm so tempted to just forget it, but it makes him happy - if he remembers it!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Marcia's picture

(post #38153, reply #19 of 55)

That's funny, but you're nice to have what DH seems to want, probably out of a sense of nostalgia. DH wouldn't touch cranberry sauce of any kind in a million years but he knows it. lol

MadMom's picture

(post #38153, reply #20 of 55)

I know.  As we get older, we tend to more and more want things the way "mom" used to make them (or serve them from a can, in the case of the cranberry sauce), even if mom wasn't the world's best cook.  I tried making homemade cranberry sauce (using a recipe from HIS mother, I might add) but he wouldn't touch it.  Wanted the canned jellied stuff.  So, every Thanksgiving and Christmas, I buy one can and throw 99% of it out.  As I said, though, it makes him happy, and it's such a small price to pay!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Marcia's picture

(post #38153, reply #21 of 55)

it makes him happy, and it's such a small price to pay!

That's very true.

Jean's picture

(post #38153, reply #23 of 55)

DGD likes that stuff too, so I have it when she's here. This year only my TDF chutney. DS finished up the stuffing, the veggies, and the pie this noon. LOL Last of deer camp.


A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
MadMom's picture

(post #38153, reply #24 of 55)

I ate the last of the gravy, mashed potatoes, and dressing for lunch today.  I'll be ready for more come Christmas, then will be happy to do without it until next Thanksgiving.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

debpasc's picture

(post #38153, reply #40 of 55)

Ate the last of our mashed potatoes, gravy and dressing at lunch the other day, too.  Still some gravy left and I had to hurry and dump it into the trash before I pored it into a water glass and drank it.  Just love that stuff!  Day after Thanksgiving I was up about 4 pounds from my usual weight -- let the holidays begin!

Gretchen's picture

(post #38153, reply #41 of 55)

I KNOW. I'm about to do the same thing!! Criminal.  LOL

Gretchen

Gretchen
tones's picture

(post #38153, reply #42 of 55)

Ah, I just asked in the gravy thread if I could freeze my gravy?

Gretchen's picture

(post #38153, reply #43 of 55)

I think you can if you want, but it will probably separate when thawed. You can probably whisk it vigorously, but it may really lose its cohesiveness.

Gretchen

Gretchen
TracyK's picture

(post #38153, reply #46 of 55)

I freeze it all the time, it's been lovely when thawed, heated and whisked.


We are all in the same boat, you and me and ex-Gov. Palin and Rep. Joe Wilson, and wealth and social status do not prevail against disease and injury. And now we must reform our health insurance system so that it reflects our common humanity. It is not decent that people avoid seeking help for want of insurance. It is not decent that people go broke trying to get well. You know it and I know it. Time to fix it.

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

tones's picture

(post #38153, reply #52 of 55)

I put it in a zip-lock bag as soon as I read this, thank you.

Lee's picture

(post #38153, reply #47 of 55)

I almost always have more gravy than turkey and I always freeze it (and usually discover it months later).  Whisk it as it's reheating and it'll be fine.

mireille_c's picture

(post #38153, reply #48 of 55)

A good way to use it later is for chicken pot pies.

Gretchen's picture

(post #38153, reply #49 of 55)

Ii don't "do" gravy in chicken pot pie!!  White sauce, alll the way.   ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
wonka's picture

(post #38153, reply #50 of 55)

I've never had a pot pie with a white sauce. I've always had it with gravy.

tones's picture

(post #38153, reply #54 of 55)

Sounds good for next week!