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Doodabug Needs Help

Doodabug's picture

I am a breaktime guy. I need help cooking.


My wife used to be a good cook and had a restaurant for a while. She had a stroke in 2000 and lost the use of her right arm so she no longer cooks.


I can heat water, make grilled cheese, spaghetti with Prego poured on top, and heat up TV dinners.


Getting pretty old after 9 years.


Anybody have a real easy recipe for a kitchen klutz.


We both like meat, potatoes, and pasta.


Even my dogs on a grille are yuk.

Doodabug's picture

(post #37610, reply #444 of 1047)

I wish I wasn't such a TV person I would have more time for more Important things.


The book is great, I already learnned not to pack my flour when I measure it off.


I was looking at 5 chicken recipes and didn't have time or ingredients for any of them. So I just took a little from all of them.

DJHinAZ's picture

(post #37610, reply #467 of 1047)

There you go! You are comfortable enough that you're able to take a little of this from one recipe, a little of that from another... You're well beyond where a lot of people get. You are AWESOME!

Doodabug's picture

(post #37610, reply #477 of 1047)

Thanks I am getting more comfortable in the kitchen. Still studying recipes before I start anything.

Jillsifer's picture

(post #37610, reply #174 of 1047)

And here is another idea, from Martha Stewart. My family really liked this one as well. I'm going to try it with peaches sometime later this week.


Blueberry Crisp


Martha Stewart


This crisp has a loose and juicy filling. If you would prefer a thicker filling, add an extra teaspoon of cornstarch.


Filling


6 cups (3 pints) blueberries


1/2 cup sugar


1 tablespoon cornstarch


1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice


1/4 teaspoon coarse salt


Topping


3/4 cup all-purpose flour


1/2 cup rolled oats (or chopped nuts, such as almonds)


1/2 teaspoon baking powder


1/2 teaspoon coarse salt


3 ounces (6 tablespoons) unsalted butter, softened


¨÷ cup sugar


 


Preheat oven to 375¡Æ. Make the filling: Mix blueberries, sugar, cornstarch, lemon juice, and salt in a bowl. Transfer to an 8-inch square baking dish.


 


Make the topping: Stir together flour, oats, baking powder, and salt. Cream butter and sugar in a mixer until pale and fluffy. Stir dry ingredients into butter. Using your hands, squeeze topping pieces together into clumps.


Sprinkle topping evenly over filling. Bake until bubbling in center and brown on top, about 1 hour. Transfer to a wire rack, and let cool for 30 minutes before serving.


 


TIPS


Crisp tip: Make and freeze extra batches of the topping. Whenever you have fresh fruit on hand, you¡¯ll be able to assemble the dessert quickly.


 


 


One thing they never tell you about child raising is that for the rest of your life, at the drop of a hat, you are expected to know your child's name and how old he or she is.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

Doodabug's picture

(post #37610, reply #175 of 1047)

Thanks I emailed both to myself. I am assuming I can use my cherries?


Dallas

Jillsifer's picture

(post #37610, reply #176 of 1047)

I'd cut the sugar just a tad if they're sweet cherries and leave it as written if you're one of the lucky souls with tart cherries. But the short answer is yes.


Let us know how it all turns out!


 


 


One thing they never tell you about child raising is that for the rest of your life, at the drop of a hat, you are expected to know your child's name and how old he or she is.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

Doodabug's picture

(post #37610, reply #179 of 1047)

They are tart. I think a Bing Cherry Tree but not sure.


I just picked some cherries. Can I just wash and bag and freeze some?


Thanks for your continued help.  Dallas

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plantlust's picture

(post #37610, reply #180 of 1047)

They sure look like sour cherries.  Bing are a darker red.


Red currant cake is next on the list. Still nothing from the local media.

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with parsley sauce, goat cheese garlic mashed potatoes, Galena Cellars Niagra grape wine & Pie Boss's apple crumble topped with Ruth & Phil's sour cream/cinnamon ice cream.

Marcia's picture

(post #37610, reply #181 of 1047)

Bing cherries aren't tart but sweet, so perhaps yours are some other kind.

Cherries freeze well, but I'd pit them first, and then freeze.

Doodabug's picture

(post #37610, reply #183 of 1047)

They are definitely not sweet so must not be Bing. Wife and I bought two different cherry trees at same time and Bing was the one I could remember.The Bing must be the one we have that doesn't do good.


This cooking stuff is good but I always need a new ingredient. I have been to the store 3 times in last 4 days. Never done that before.


Going to have to make a new cupboard to keep all this stuff. Ha Ha


Thank you Dallas

Marcia's picture

(post #37610, reply #184 of 1047)

I hear you about ingredients...buying new food items can become an addiction, but it's fun!

Tart cherries make the best pies and cobblers. Perhaps there is something like that in your future. :)

I love tart food and eat them straight up. I believe Risottogirl does, too. She's a trained chef, as is Glenys and some others. Me, I'm just a home cook, but I've been obsessed with good food all my life, and that's not a bad thing.

kathymcmo's picture

(post #37610, reply #187 of 1047)

We're going to have to find you some good info on how to keep a well-stocked pantry :-)


And being a carpenter, you could really craft a great shelving setup for it.

Doodabug's picture

(post #37610, reply #190 of 1047)

That would be good. I really would like to go to store once a week. All that driving not good for enviorment and all that.


My wife's name is Barb. She spent time today organizing cupboards to make room for my new hobby stuff.


Thanks Dallas

kathymcmo's picture

(post #37610, reply #194 of 1047)

Here's some info, and I think I will start another thread so others can specify what they like to keep on hand in the pantry, fridge and freezer. I too try to limit my trips to the store to just one day a week, with some success.


Also keep in mind that you can often substitute an ingredient if you want to make some dish and are missing something. MadMom here is so famous for that we've invented a verb to describe MadMomming a dish. Until you start to get a feel for what subs would work, just come here, post a question in the Cooking Discussion folder and you'll get plenty of good advice.


Also keep in mind some of this is from the SF paper where we're pretty "foodie" so you won't need all these things, and you can stock up in phases, not all at once.


http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2001/03/14/FD216323.DTL


http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/10/08/FDTK13B3HI.DTL

Doodabug's picture

(post #37610, reply #196 of 1047)

Good to know things on those sights.


I see your new thread and will be paying attention to what everyone has to say.


I forgot the flour and the unsalted butter last night.           Dallas

Marcia's picture

(post #37610, reply #197 of 1047)

Lists...when you go to the market you need a list, and should have an ongoing one in a convenient place, preferably in your kitchen. Both you and your wife can add to it.

Lists organized by product type can be helpful, but I'm not all that organized, and just jot things down when I remember. Some people organize their lists by the aisles in their markets, but I go to so many different stores that wouldn't be practical, plus it would drive me nuts. LOL

Sorry I missed that Jill had posted that recipe for your cherries. Some people should read more carefully. ;-)


Edited 7/15/2009 6:49 pm ET by Marcia

Doodabug's picture

(post #37610, reply #198 of 1047)

The problem is I had the list and still forgot. Need a pen to check off too. I'm guilty, I try to make my list by aisle.


I asked Jill if I could substitute my cherries is how the cherry thing started.


Dallas

Doodabug's picture

(post #37610, reply #185 of 1047)

How do you pit a cherry? Just sqeeze it out of there?

plantlust's picture

(post #37610, reply #186 of 1047)

Correct. Or you can (insert a small delicate cough here) buy a new tool<G>.


Red currant cake is next on the list. Still nothing from the local media.

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with parsley sauce, goat cheese garlic mashed potatoes, Galena Cellars Niagra grape wine & Pie Boss's apple crumble topped with Ruth & Phil's sour cream/cinnamon ice cream.

Maedl's picture

(post #37610, reply #188 of 1047)

If you have a cherry tree, you should get a cherry pitter. Taking the seeds out is a tedious job--even with the pitter. I made a cherry soup one year and spent an entire evening pitting the blasted things--and the recipe only made enough for four portions!

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Doodabug's picture

(post #37610, reply #191 of 1047)

Cherries are the pits to pit. I did 6 cups last night and it wasn't fun.


By the time I went to store and pitted cherries it was time for bed.


Dallas

Maedl's picture

(post #37610, reply #209 of 1047)

I know--kinda makes you want to rip out the cherry trees and plant blueberries or blackberries instead, doesn't it? I usually eat the cherries as is and use berries or some other fruit that is easier to pit for desserts. You can make that kind of substitution without problems.

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Doodabug's picture

(post #37610, reply #211 of 1047)

Yeh, I think I will let the birds and bugs have the rest.


I like blackberries just as much as cherries. Dallas

Napie's picture

(post #37610, reply #213 of 1047)

I’m very late to this thread but I think it is just outstanding that you are taking on the challenge of a new skill.  I pretty much taught myself to cook with a bit of help from some kind souls along the way.  The thing that I found most useful is that cooking is not really about recipes but technique.  You are a carpenter I see (as was I about six careers ago...) so think of recipes as the prints but the techniques as how you build.  The plans never tell you how to toe-nail a jack stud or header into place or how to fit bridging or scribe a door, that is technique.


 


There are only a few ways to cook food: roast/bake, boil, sauté (fry), braise or grill, (also there are some others like smoking, etc) and they apply to just about every food.   Learn the each technique and the rest will come pretty easy.  If you can cope crown you can cook!

MadMom's picture

(post #37610, reply #214 of 1047)

Good point.  Depending on how adventurous he is, I always recommend Pam Anderson's How to Cook Without a Book, which is more about techniques than recipes.  She gives her recipes in the form of "one from column a, one from column b, one from column c, etc" which allows for a lot of variation if you learn the simple technique.  Hard to explain, but I love it.  Of course, I love any book of hers!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Doodabug's picture

(post #37610, reply #218 of 1047)

I can cope crown so maybe there is hope for me.


I haven't cooked very much but wife and I have ate everything I have cooked and enjoyed it. Don't think that would have happened without the support I have gotten here. I have been lucking with my timing so far, everything is done about same time.


Thank You   Dallas

mireillec's picture

(post #37610, reply #220 of 1047)

You're definitively talented, as you're just a beginner with all this.

Doodabug's picture

(post #37610, reply #222 of 1047)

Thanks  My boss says I am creative and methodical, maybe it is spilling over in to my cooking. Or is methodical a nice way of saying I am slow?


I have two hobbies now toy building and cooking.


Dallas

mireillec's picture

(post #37610, reply #225 of 1047)

It's 2 great hobbies.

Doodabug's picture

(post #37610, reply #226 of 1047)