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Do you peel celery?

Ballottine's picture

I haven't until last week.   Until last week I have never heard  that one should peel celery, but I can confirm that peeled celery makes a big difference  when served row in salads.  I am  also told  that peeled celery  makes a big difference in Celery Victor, but I doubt anyone makes it anymore. lol. bal

 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

soupereasy's picture

(post #34912, reply #1 of 30)

I don't use that much celery, but I always peel my bell peppers. ( No pun intended.) I rather like not having to deal with the shards of pepper skin, especially in a cooked dish.

Ballottine's picture

(post #34912, reply #3 of 30)

I've JP do it with a peeler. I've never done it dough. I do take skin off from bell peppers by  burn/steam in a covered bowl method. How do you do It?  Bal

 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

Marcia's picture

(post #34912, reply #2 of 30)

My mother and grandmother always did, however, I do not.

Ballottine's picture

(post #34912, reply #4 of 30)


 

My mother and grandmother always did...


....and I thought I was picking up a 21st century tecnique...so much for my being in the avanguarde...lol.  bal


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

Gretchen's picture

(post #34912, reply #8 of 30)

My mother always did it. She called it "stringing". That was mid-twentieth century. I don't.  But Mother served "celery" as a real "dish". Filled with cheese, etc. and Yes, it is MUCH more "edible" when this is done--"tender" to the tooth, without those ugly strings hanging off of the stalk. I suspect she picked it up from her good friend, Germaine, when they lived in Paris--if not my grandmother.

Gretchen


Edited 10/7/2007 7:50 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
plantlust's picture

(post #34912, reply #9 of 30)

I don't peel but I do "destring". I do this in whatever dish I use celery. Hmmm, wonder if peeling makes the celery taste better than just "destringing"?

Did you know that pitbull puppies are part gazelle? Yep, Beauty, the cherry tomato fanatic decided to leap to the Dark Side where the food and fun is. At 11pm, just after I exit my car. In the pitch dark. I'm washing my underwear as I type.

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with parsley sauce, goat cheese garlic mashed potatoes, Galena Cellars Niagra grape wine & Pie Boss's apple crumble topped with Ruth & Phil's sour cream/cinnamon ice cream.

Adele's picture

(post #34912, reply #11 of 30)

The last time I used celery I peeled it and will from now on.  The strings are/were the reason I didn't like celery.  I don't intend to start keeping it as a staple though.  Don't like it THAT much.  LOL

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Marcia's picture

(post #34912, reply #12 of 30)

In the 19th and early 20th centuries (and perhaps before, but I'm not sure) celery was very popular and was on always served at large meals. There were even special 'celery dishes' which are collectable.


Times change.

Ballottine's picture

(post #34912, reply #16 of 30)

What do you mean by "destring?" how is that different from peeling? Bal

 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

Gretchen's picture

(post #34912, reply #18 of 30)

What do you mean by "peeling"? I think it is the same thing.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #34912, reply #20 of 30)

It is the same thing in my book.

chiffonade's picture

(post #34912, reply #21 of 30)

What do you mean by "peeling"?


I take peeling to mean, take a peeler to a vegetable (which I don't do with celery).  If I de-string, I take the end of the celery stalk, cut into a small piece at the end, then pull that away from the stalk, taking the strings. 


Cuisinart® Vegetable Peeler


"Sandra Lee is the Culinary Anti-Christ and I am the Anti-Sandra Lee.  The precious moments you may take to measure a level cup of flour are NOT wasted time!"


Chiffonade

*You're a REAL person, eat REAL food."

Chiffonade

whatscooking's picture

(post #34912, reply #23 of 30)

Celery, if I had to name my least favorite vegetable that would be it.  Only in soup can I tolerate it.  I've never understood how people could eat it with peanut butter and raisins - ants on a log (?)

Whatever befalls the Earth, befalls the people of the Earth.
 Chief Seattle

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Lee's picture

(post #34912, reply #26 of 30)

I rarely eat it raw, and I've never come across celery with peanut butter and raisins, but I love it stuffed with blue cheese. 

Gretchen's picture

(post #34912, reply #27 of 30)

IF  and I repeat IF I was serving celery with blue cheese as a caterer (and that is not an impossibility), it would for sure be "peeled/stringed".

Gretchen

Gretchen
plantlust's picture

(post #34912, reply #24 of 30)

Peeling is peeling.  Like you would butternut squash or potato.


When I destring, all I do is trim the ends of the celery, gently, not all the way thru the veggie.  If the end hangs on by celery threads, I tug all the way to pull of the threads/strings.  They are usually in the indentations of the celery ribs.


Did you know that pitbull puppies are part gazelle? Yep, Beauty, the cherry tomato fanatic decided to leap to the Dark Side where the food and fun is. At 11pm, just after I exit my car. In the pitch dark. I'm washing my underwear as I type.

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with parsley sauce, goat cheese garlic mashed potatoes, Galena Cellars Niagra grape wine & Pie Boss's apple crumble topped with Ruth & Phil's sour cream/cinnamon ice cream.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #34912, reply #5 of 30)

I peeled once - thought it was a ton of fun, the way the little ribbons come off

never did it again, forgot completely about it. Time to try it again...
;-)

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

chiffonade's picture

(post #34912, reply #6 of 30)

I've never peeled celery because I usually cut it up so small the stringiness didn't matter.  I do however, string it when I am serving it in larger pieces.

"Sandra Lee is the Culinary Anti-Christ and I am the Anti-Sandra Lee.  The precious moments you may take to measure a level cup of flour are NOT wasted time!"


Chiffonade

*You're a REAL person, eat REAL food."

Chiffonade

Ballottine's picture

(post #34912, reply #7 of 30)

Is there any way possible to clone your knife skills? (L) bal


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

samchang's picture

(post #34912, reply #10 of 30)

Depends on the application. Usually not, but for Chinese mushroom and celery salad, I most certainly do.

Ballottine's picture

(post #34912, reply #14 of 30)

Is there a recipe for Chinese Mushroom and Celery Salad that you would share? Bal


PS: I do not recall ever having celery, the kind sold in US grocery stores, in China.  I tasted my first stalk of celery in San Francisco. (L)


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

samchang's picture

(post #34912, reply #25 of 30)

'Gweilo celery' is not available in most parts of China, although you can buy it in Hong Kong if you're ailling to shell out thrice the price for it.

I think I've posted the celery mushroom salad before, but it is very simple. Destring (and I'm getting into this peeling-destringing thing: I just break the stalk in the middle with my hands and remove the obvious tough fibers and call that peeling) 5 large stalks of celery and julienne into 4" pieces. Julienne the same amount of shimeji mushrooms (aka King Oyster mushrooms) into the same size. In a skillet, heat 1 Tbs fragrant peanut oil and add the celery and mushrooms. Hit it with some salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetable and fungus has cooked though and (this is important) any liquid has been evaporated. Take off the heat and mix with 1 1/2 tsp sesame oil. Serve up hot or rom temp or anywhere in between.

Its taste and texture is unlike anything you'd expect from a 5 ingredient dish.

Lee's picture

(post #34912, reply #13 of 30)

I've never peeled celery, but I'm another one who peels bell peppers unless ther're going to be eaten raw.

Ballottine's picture

(post #34912, reply #15 of 30)

I have never peeled celery until last week either, did not know that it will "add" to my tuna salad.  L. Bal

 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

soupereasy's picture

(post #34912, reply #17 of 30)

I prefer them peeled for salads as well.
I just cut them along the ribs and peel with my veggie peeler.

Lee's picture

(post #34912, reply #19 of 30)

Yup, that's how I do it.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #34912, reply #28 of 30)

I peel celery for raw or cooked preparations and peppers for cooked preparations.


The exception on celery is for mirepoix, or other times when it will be removed before service. I don't bother to peel it then.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #34912, reply #22 of 30)

I always peel celery. 


"Artichokes ...
are just plain annoying ...
After all the trouble you go to, you get about as much actual 'food' out of eating an artichoke as you would from licking thirty or forty postage stamps.
Have the shrimp cocktail instead."
Miss Piggy

annieqst's picture

(post #34912, reply #29 of 30)

My mother always peeled her celery. I'm a sometime-zer. I don't for us unless it's one tough stalk, but for company, I always peel.

Fledge's picture

(post #34912, reply #30 of 30)

Yup, the outer layers.

You don't scare me


I have an African Grey

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey