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Dinner Party Ideas

PatricKinOnt's picture

Hi all.


Haven't been on here for so long I had to re-set my password :/


Anyhow, I'm looking for ideas for an Italian dinner party/wine pairing theme.  The only thing I have on the menu right now is Osso Bucco Milanese. A guest is bringing a nice Borolo to go with it. 


I would like to have at least 2 different kinds of wine, preferably 3, each matched to a course or two.  I want to stay away from the more typical Italian theme and do something a little more contemporary. Maybe a nice arugula salad with pecorino, a soup of some sort to start, and a first course.  Follow this with a sorbet and then go to the Osso Bucco.


I'm kinda stumped for dessert ideas. DW doesn't like Tiramisu (???) but I think something with hazelnut would be nice with espressos.  Semifreddo?


Cheers,


Patrick




A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
Sir Winston Churchill
 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
plantlust's picture

(post #33193, reply #1 of 15)

Pannacotta or however you spell it.  Light, smooth, can be made chocolate or not.

I am NOT a Luddite. I just happen to be very picky about which technology I embrace.

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with parsley sauce, goat cheese garlic mashed potatoes, Galena Cellars Niagra grape wine & Pie Boss's apple crumble topped with Ruth & Phil's sour cream/cinnamon ice cream.

Syrah's picture

(post #33193, reply #2 of 15)

Chocolate pots with chestnut puree incorporated?

"god, I'd love to turn this little blue world upside down", Tori Amos

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

PatricKinOnt's picture

(post #33193, reply #3 of 15)

yummm, chocolate and chestnut has an italian ring, so does the panna cotta.


Any first course ideas?




A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
Sir Winston Churchill
 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
Syrah's picture

(post #33193, reply #4 of 15)

Something light based on your main I would think..

You could do my scallop and eggplant sandwiches. Whilst not strictly Italian, they have the feel.

I am about to go to bed, however if you can't them on here I will post again. Let me know.

"god, I'd love to turn this little blue world upside down", Tori Amos

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #33193, reply #6 of 15)

Hey, that sounds wonderful!  I would not mind it at all if you posted the recipe!

Syrah's picture

(post #33193, reply #9 of 15)

http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cookstalk/messages?msg=20689.1

"god, I'd love to turn this little blue world upside down", Tori Amos

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

butterscotch's picture

(post #33193, reply #5 of 15)

Osso buco is such a substantial dish. Are you sure you want to serve three courses first? Your guests will likely be in a food coma before they even taste it. I would suggest preceding the osso buco with a small portion of some very light vegetable-based first course and, if you really want salad, serving it after the main course. I would also suggest bagging the soup, since osso buco is soupy.


P.S. I don't mean to give you a hard time. My husband is Milanese, and I've cooked my share of osso buco for him and have also enjoyed many multi-course family dinners in Italy cooked by his extended family there.  Our Italian relatives are magnificent cooks, but it's very hard to do justice to a 6-course meal, no matter how wonderful the food is and how devotedly the host has worked to prepare it. Less is really more.

PatricKinOnt's picture

(post #33193, reply #7 of 15)

Wow, that is a great point. I tend to get carried away with these things and thanks for grounding me!  I think i'm just going to limit it to a killer salad using arugula and a decandant but minimal dessert.  Something that goes well with grappa and espresso.


If I could ask, do you usually do a gremolta (sp?) with the veal? Also, what about the addition of roasted vegatables like fennel, mushrooms, red onion, carrots,etc to the dish as well? 


Thanks again,


caio!




A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
Sir Winston Churchill
 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
butterscotch's picture

(post #33193, reply #8 of 15)

Your new plan sounds great.


Yes, I usually do make gremolata (in fact, I always do). It does great things for osso buco--really brightens the flavor a lot. Also, roasted vegetables sound good to me, but I'm not clear whether you're thinking of them as a side dish or whether you want to incorporate them into them into the osso buco when you cook it. Either way, this sounds delicious to me, as I think osso buco should have a rich, roasty flavor.


And now, I have a question: Are you planning to serve the osso buco in the traditional way--i.e., surrounded by a circle of risotto ala milanese? You certainly don't have to, but it's a beautiful, dramatic, and highly presentation, and I think it would just wow your dinner party guests.

PatricKinOnt's picture

(post #33193, reply #10 of 15)

surrounded by a circle of risotto ala milanese


Sounds like a wonderful idea! I'll be using huge 12" rimmed pasta bowls so this would be awesome.  Regarding the roasted veg. I was going to plate this right beside the osso bucco. What do you think about doing a 3/4 circle of Risotto and the remaining with the roasted veg?  I'm going to ask my butcher for centre cut shanks so 1 per person will be enough.  Do you have a preferred thickness for the shanks?  I have to order them ahead so I might as well get it right! 


For a antipasto / Amuse Bouche idea here is a picture of the caprese I do.  We'll have that about a 1/2 hour before the salad with a little reduced balsamic for garnish.


Thanks so much.. again :)


 




A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
Sir Winston Churchill
 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
PreviewAttachmentSize
Caprese_018.jpg
Caprese_018.jpg30.56 KB
butterscotch's picture

(post #33193, reply #11 of 15)

The caprese is very, very pretty. I'm sure your guests will enjoy the whole meal tremendously.


As for thickness of the veal shanks, I'm not sure what to advise. Our butcher gets them from somewhere else, and they're pre-cut, so I never have any choice about thickness. Ours are sold very thick (at least 2"). If I did have a choice, I would go for something a little thinner  (1 1/2" or so)--maily because I have a hard time handling such a big serving. My husband, who was raised on osso buco, doesn't mind a thick cut at all.


 

BonnieinHolland's picture

(post #33193, reply #12 of 15)

Patrick,


I agree with not going overboard on the number of courses, and doing just a salad, an osso buco with a Milanese risoto, and a simple dessert.  With the salad, you might think about trying a pinot grigio (the Italian version of the French pinot gris) from Trentino-Alto Adige.  It will be fresh, light, and able to handle the salad dressing (a killer for many wines).  The Barolo is a classic with the Osso buco - but I have to say that I am definitely not a fan of gremolata with osso buco when the osso buco is going to paired with a wine of quality like a Barolo (or Amarone).  The reason is that the citrus in the gremolata is a killer for red wines.  So I personally would not go the gremolata route in order to give the Barolo its proper due.


cheers, Bonnie

PatricKinOnt's picture

(post #33193, reply #13 of 15)

Hi there,


That is a great point considering the Borolo is a $50 wine.  I was also thinking pinot grigio as it's my default italian white and it's food friendly acidity helps cut through difficult matches but  I may serve a procecco instead, if I can find a decent one.  If not, I have a line on some of Elena Walch's latest release of P.G. which I'm guessing should be awesome considering her reputation.


Thanks for your insight. I like a wine like that to take centre stage.


 




 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
BonnieinHolland's picture

(post #33193, reply #14 of 15)

Patrick,


A prosecco, like champagne, works with (almost) anything.  That sounds great!


cheers, Bonnie

KarenP's picture

(post #33193, reply #15 of 15)

http://www.foodandwine.com/articles/ciao-champagne


Daphne Malvasia Secco also falls in that category..it's fruity, but dry.  Doesn't have an over the top price tag, but is very nice.