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Diabetes

CilaChurro's picture

Diabetes (post #26409)

I have a friend who has "diabetes" and, of course, doesn't eat cakes very often.


I would like to bake him something, but have no experience in this field. After a search, the only substitute to sugar I could find was fructose.


Does anyone have an advice, idea, recipe or a good link, please?

baker2006's picture

(post #26409, reply #1 of 27)

Cecilia,

I think it was Wolvie who said she succesfully used "Splenda."

KC

"Only infinite patience reaps immediate rewards."

                              M.Williamson

TSittler's picture

(post #26409, reply #5 of 27)

I've baked a little bit w/splenda. My banana bread turns out great. I did need to shorten the bake time a smidge, tho. Also, since splenda basically has no volume (think cotton candy), you need to account for that (e.g., use a smaller pan, etc.). In cakes this can be disastrous, since the proportions (and weights) are pretty precise as I understand it. Perhaps go the quick bread method instead?

Theresa          information junkie...

Theresa        Cowtown information junkie...
hambiscuit's picture

(post #26409, reply #2 of 27)

Fructose is fruit sugar, so would still count as a sugar exchange on a diabetic's diet. Best not to make sweets for the diabetic friend, maybe some other type of food. If you still plan to bake a dessert of some kind, I'm told that "Splenda", a natural sugar substitute, can be subbed for real sugar (measured as sugar is in the recipe) with pretty good results. Haven't tried it myself.


 


 

UncleDunc's picture

(post #26409, reply #3 of 27)

I've seen reports of research in the last few years that suggest controlling total carboydrate intake may be as effective as limiting sugar, meaning it may be OK to eat a little cake if you're careful. I'm diabetic and I still avoid sweets, but that's mostly because I have a self control problem.

There is an herbal sweetener, Stevia rebaudiana, that has been getting a lot of play recently. It sounds promising, and I haven't seen any negative reports, but I haven't tried it myself.

I am not a nutritionist, nor do I play one on television, :) but to my knowledge, fructose is not a sugar substitute. It is another form of sugar, like glucose, maltose, dextrose, etc., with about the same number of calories per pound and about the same digestion and uptake rates.


Edited 6/12/2002 7:07:39 PM ET by Uncle Dunc

Jean's picture

(post #26409, reply #4 of 27)

http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/d_08_200.htm


You could check out this link.


 


Am I ambivalent?  Well, yes and no.

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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help to provide free mammograms for women in need
KimR521's picture

(post #26409, reply #6 of 27)

I've seen reports of research in the last few years that suggest controlling total carboydrate intake may be as effective as limiting sugar, meaning it may be OK to eat a little cake if you're careful.


You are right.  My son is a Type I diabetic and  he counts his carbohydrates.  If he eats a piece of cake or has anything sweet, he just uses it as one of his carbs. 

ashleydbrit's picture

(post #26409, reply #7 of 27)

For useful information and recipes try Diabetic Gourmet

"I don't like gourmet cooking or 'this' cooking or 'that' cooking. I like 'good cooking.'"
James Beard

CilaChurro's picture

(post #26409, reply #8 of 27)

Thank you so much for your replies. I don't  have any experience cooking for diabetics but I'm very interested in learning.


Since I posted I had a few minutes to google around but theres's so much information...I learned something about exchanges, and I saw many recipes, using sugar substitutes, applesauce, unsweetened fruit juice, etc.


 Don't have time to try many recipes and I can't find Splenda, applesauce...


Still looking around...

TSittler's picture

(post #26409, reply #9 of 27)

Hopefully splenda is in the grocery store. It's still a bit new so may not be in all markets yet. It's sold in packets as well as bulk, which is a bit tougher to find. It's also still expensive.

Theresa          information junkie...

Theresa        Cowtown information junkie...
RheaS's picture

(post #26409, reply #10 of 27)

Probably even more difficult for Cecilia because I don't think she's in the U.S. I do see Splenda at some grocery stores here, but I haven't tried it yet.


Stevia looks very promising, but I haven't tried it for baking. I've used it to sweeten ginger tea and other drinks and it's very good for that purpose. It has no after-taste unlike the artificial sweeteners and you use very little.

UncleDunc's picture

(post #26409, reply #11 of 27)

>> Stevia looks very promising, but I haven't tried it for baking.

I haven't either, haven't even done any research, but I'm not hopeful, for any recipes that depend on the physical properties of sugar. On the other hand, I can imagine inventing lots of new desserts with Stevia that wouldn't be possible with sugar.

On a related topic, I tried some of the sugar-free hard candies one time. I thought they tasted pretty good, no awful aftertaste. But my body could tell the difference. After I finished one, I didn't want another one, whereas with real candy it's a struggle not to suk down the whole bag.

elizaram's picture

(post #26409, reply #12 of 27)

I've had good results with this cookbook, and have prepared some desserts for my diabetic mother-in-law from the recipes.


http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0892814497/qid=1024004708/sr=1-4/ref=sr_1_4/002-8821951-0805661



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

CilaChurro's picture

(post #26409, reply #13 of 27)

You're right, I'm not in the U.S...


 I'll try Splenda maybe 10 years from now...right after buttermilk, chocolate chips, sour cream, cream cheese and so on...


I've heard that fructose is tolerated by diabetics. I still would like to try something with it! Like this recipe I found. I think I'll try it tomorrow and let you know.I'll use fructose as a substitute for sugar.


Tropical Muffins

Exchanges: 1 starch, 1 Fat


Serving Size: 1 muffin Calories: 143


Carbohydrate: 23 gm Fiber: 1 gm


Protein: 3 gm Sodium: 237 mg


Fat: 4gm Cholesterol: 15 mg


 <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />


INGREDIENTS:


1 ¾ cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon grated orange rind


2 teaspoons baking powder

1/3 cup unsweetened orange juice


¼ teaspoon baking soda

3 medium-size ripe bananas, mashed


½ teaspoon salt

1 egg, lightly beaten


Sugar substitute to equal ¾ Cup sugar*

Vegetable cooking spray


¼ cup unsweetened shredded coconut


1/3 cup reduced-calorie margarine, melted


STEPS IN PEPARATION:



  1. Combine first 5 ingredients in a large bowl: stir in coconut, and make a well in center of mixture.

  2. Combine margarine, orange rind, orange juice, banana, and egg; add mixture to dry ingredients, stirring just until dry ingredients are moistened.

  3. Spoon batter into muffin pans coated with cooking spray, filling two-thirds full. Bake at 375 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes or until lightly browned.
Yield: 1 dozen muffins.
dixieleigh's picture

(post #26409, reply #14 of 27)

This is right up front and personal with me right now. MY DD just went to doctor this morning. She has been losing weight since the birth of her baby (now 1 year old). She looks like a child from Ethiopia (sp). Just pre-diagnosed herself and tested herself before this visit to her Dr. She had gestational (sp) diabetes while pregnant which they told her would not be a problem after the baby was born.


WRONG - She tested in at 460 this morning and the DR wanted her to go to the emergency room. She would not because of insurance problems. (And what in the H E L L is wrong with our insurance companies in this country anyway). If she were in Europe insurance would not be a problem. Her health care would not be a problem.


I don't know what the correct numbers are, but apparently hers were waaaay outside the limits. Sweets and desserts are not an issue here since she doesn't like them and doesn't eat them. So I willl probably be questioning every one here about what she can/cannot eat. Her Dr. told her this morning just to "eat" to gain some weight. I am not buying his pat little answer. I think what she eats will have some significant bearing on this problem. I am very upset - she is only 34 years old and apparently going to be a slave to taking the insulin shots every day the rest of her life. But, thank goodness, the insulin is available and can control this. I am ranting here because I am so frustrated.


 


 

 

 

Jean's picture

(post #26409, reply #15 of 27)

Oh, Dixie, with sugars that high, I'm surprised she could function!  I hope she can get this under control quickly!! I'll put her on my 'special' list too.

 


Am I ambivalent?  Well, yes and no.

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Wolvie's picture

(post #26409, reply #16 of 27)

I hear what you are saying about the insurance problem, but - she really should go to the hospital if the DR wanted her too. Those numbers are dangerously high - not to be too blunt about it - my Uncle died with numbers like that, due to his stubborness and eating habits ( not sweets, either).


To get it under control up front, she should go to the hospital as I said. There are many great books out there that explain the issues with carbohydrate absorption rate, which basically determines the diet. She should see a licensed nutritionist to get the real lowdown. I can send you a chart on all foods that the DR's gave us when my Mom was diagnosed. It is kept current, so as the dietary "laws" for diabetics have changed, so has the food chart.


If she gets it under control, she may be able to take pills, and may even be able to come off the meds altogether with the proper diet. I have seen it happen, even with numbers that high.


Good luck, I will be thinking about you and your DD.....


Woe to the cook whose sauce has no sting
- Chaucer

 

dixieleigh's picture

(post #26409, reply #21 of 27)

I can send you a chart on all foods that the DR's gave us when my Mom was diagnosed.


Wolvie, is this chart on line anywhere? I would love to have get a copy of it. Daughter's count has come down considerably in the last two days, but still not normal. Thanks.


 


 

 

 

Wolvie's picture

(post #26409, reply #25 of 27)

Dixie - this site has a list of different foods that you can plug amounts into to get the carbs. Not quite what I had in mind, but - I can't, so far, find the chart the doctor gave my Mom anywhere online that doesn't require some form of registration or payment.


This does have the basic info,tho.  I'll keep looking - if I find anything else, I'll post it! :-)


Your daughter really should get someone to look at her, and help decide how many carbs she can handle in a day to maintain a healthy blood sugar level. They'll teach her how to read the labels on the food products she buys (that have them), and eat the right amount and balance of foods.  Just my 2 cents!


 


http://www.lowcarbyummies.com/carbohydrate-counter-chart.htm


Edit - this is not meant as an indorsement of Atkins or any low carb diet, I am just looking for a chart that gives carbo counts for food.


Edit number 2 -  


The general site http://www.mendosa.com/gi.htm explains to some degree the new way the doctors and dieticians are treating diabetics.  A lot of info here.


Woe to the cook whose sauce has no sting
- Chaucer


Edited 6/15/2002 8:42:32 AM ET by Wolvie

Edited 6/15/2002 8:47:04 AM ET by Wolvie


Edited 6/15/2002 8:53:34 AM ET by Wolvie

 

TSittler's picture

(post #26409, reply #26 of 27)

Was this the index you were thinking about, Wolvie?


http://www.mendosa.com/gilists.htm


Theresa          information junkie...
Theresa        Cowtown information junkie...
Wolvie's picture

(post #26409, reply #27 of 27)

no - that lists the gi numbers. I am looking for straight carbo info - that translates much easier than gi numbers to most folks! But - thanks!! :-)

Woe to the cook whose sauce has no sting
- Chaucer

 

Tuck's picture

(post #26409, reply #17 of 27)

Dixie, I'm sorry to hear about your daughter, what a worry for you but I too think she should go to the hospital so she can be regulated properly.  Life is far to short to take chances.


~tuck
If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague

hambiscuit's picture

(post #26409, reply #18 of 27)

Dixie, if she hasn't gone to the emergency room by now, get her thereby whatever means it takes. Normal blood sugar is 80-120. She is definitely in the diabetic coma range.  I'm surprised she can walk around.

 

TSittler's picture

(post #26409, reply #20 of 27)

Dixie, there is some new thinking in the diabetes world regarding sugar. Every food which is not a protein or fat is a form of glucose (read: sugar). Some are complex and cause a s-l-o-w rise in blood sugar; and some are simple, which causes a fast rise. The new part is that unexpected things are causing fast: like a baked potato or bread. It's all a simple starch (again, read: sugar), and it sends blood sugar off the charts. Then something like a snickers bar is actually low (altho there is the fat content), because it's a complex sugar. Go figure. And you can't tell what is what just by looking. It's all tested and stuff is all over the map.


There are several books out about it. One is Glucose Revolution by Jenni Brand-Miller. Also, here is a link to another site which has lists the 'glucose index' of a lot of foods.  This will also give you a quick introduction to what I've mentioned. The weird thing is that the American Diabetes Assoc does not believe in differences in sugars. It's hard to ignore this, tho. Hope it helps.


http://www.mendosa.com/diabetes.htm


 


Theresa          information junkie...
Theresa        Cowtown information junkie...
dixieleigh's picture

(post #26409, reply #22 of 27)

Thanks for this link - it has a lot of information in it. I have forwarded it to my daughter.

 


 

 

 

Wolvie's picture

(post #26409, reply #24 of 27)

that's the carbo absorption thing I was talking about - all foods eventually turn into  carbos, but some are almost  immediate,such as bread, pasta, sugar, starchy veggies like corn, peas, etc.,  some are not.


Most doctors or registered dieticians would tell you that your daughter should count her carbo intake, the amount that they now recommend varies from person to person, depending on the severity of their diabetes.


 


Dixie - I'll check these links , and look for this chart I'm talking about and get back to you. I'm glad to hear that your daughter's count is way down!!


Woe to the cook whose sauce has no sting
- Chaucer

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #26409, reply #23 of 27)

Dixie, it is foolhardy for her to not to be seeking a doctor's opinion on treatment. She needs an  endocrinologist and one fast.  A dear friend's daughter (about 98 # soaking wet, 33 years old, )was misdiagnosed and treated for diabetes during pregnancy--it could have cost her her child'slife due to the level of insulin she was given.  Her father is fortunately a wonderful doctor here and got her to see a fine endocrinologist.  Yes, she will be a "slave" to insulin but she will be alive. She is a good friend of my daughter's.  She had a touch and go pregnancy and delivery but has a dear little boy.  Internet is fine for friends and some information but it will not suffice for this. 

Gretchen

Gretchen
Ninochtka's picture

(post #26409, reply #19 of 27)

One of the products my Aunt used for her diabetes were those from Wax Orchards they are all natural fruit sugars.  Because they are natural they can be used by diabetic (using the diet exchange process) and those people who are allergic to the artificial sweeteners.


Their website is http://www.waxorchards.com/