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Delmonico history

Ozark's picture

Read the history   http://www.steakperfection.com/delmonico/Steak.html


NEW YORK, New York -- The Delmonico Steak is one of the most desirable and well-known steaks on the market.  It originated between 1840 and 1850 as the house cut at Delmonico's Restaurant in lower Manhattan. 


However, there is a problem with the modern name "Delmonico Steak":  no one seems to remember the exact cut of beef that was the ....................................................


"A wink is good as a nod to a blind man."

 

Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

TracyK's picture

(post #32991, reply #1 of 4)

Porterhouse?

CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

unbaked's picture

(post #32991, reply #2 of 4)

According to my butcher out here in Calif. at least, a delmonico is a bonein ribeye. The one I bought was about 2" thick. It certainly looked like a ribeye, just massive.

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

ashleyd's picture

(post #32991, reply #3 of 4)

A fascinating story, well researched, just goes to show how language (and dishes) can change over time.


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Lee's picture

(post #32991, reply #4 of 4)

When I lived in NYC, boneless rib eye steaks at the meat markets were labeled "Delmonico."