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Deep Fried Goose

splinter26's picture

Anybody ever deep fried a goose? I just did one the same way I do a turkey with a few extra steps. It was great. Even had folks who wont touch wild game say it tasted like roast beef. If anyones interested I will post my method.


Edited 1/29/2004 5:48:33 AM ET by splinter

meljanbil's picture

(post #28827, reply #1 of 7)

Never thought to deep fry a goose.  I would definately like to hear how you did it. 

splinter26's picture

(post #28827, reply #2 of 7)

I combined several techniques that seemed to lend themselves to solving the two problems I have had with cooking them before. Namely, excess fat and strong flavor. To solve the fat problem I lightly scored the skin with a scalpel with many small slits being careful not to cut the muscle. Then I dipped the bird into a large pot of boiling water for about 8 to 10 minutes. This rendered much of the fat from the skin as well as giving the skin of the bird an interesting appearance much like the lattice top of a pie. Then I rubbed the entire bird inside and out with straight cayenne pepper and Tony Chacheres Creole seasoning. I know what your thinking, but you will not end up with an overly spicy hot flavor. For some reason the heat of the oil tames it down. The bird is placed in a plastic bag and allowed to marinate for 24 hours. I then hung the bird and allowed it to dry and age for another 24 hours. This hanging and drying process can be done for up to 3 days as long as the temp is kept between 25 and 35 degrees. This "aging" process is common with many game animal recipes for it allows the meat to tenderize naturally. Finally, in a deep fryer of peanut oil at between 325 and 350 degrees, carefully lower the bird and allow to cook for 15 minutes much the way you would cook a turkey. I tied wire to the ends of the legs to make handling it easier. After it has finished frying, remove it from the oil and drain, patting any excess oil from the skin with paper toweling. Wrap the bird in a double layer of foil and place in a 250 degree oven, breast side down for at least 45 minutes. You can keep the bird this way for up to 2 hours. I've never let it set any longer than that so I don't know for sure. The flavor is not as strong as other goose I have eaten and the meat stays moist and tender.

I hope you find this helpful!

Gretchen's picture

(post #28827, reply #3 of 7)

I take it this is a domestic goose--not wild.

Gretchen

Gretchen
splinter26's picture

(post #28827, reply #4 of 7)

I'm sorry....should have mentioned that it was a wild Canada goose. I suppose this recipe would work for a domestic goose. But I've always used wild ones.

Gretchen's picture

(post #28827, reply #5 of 7)

I think I am surprised that there is that much fat on the wild ones. How do you pluck--paraffin?

Gretchen

Gretchen
splinter26's picture

(post #28827, reply #6 of 7)

The older the bird, the more fat there is. It also is rather strong tasting. Surprisingly enough, when you deep fry a goose or turkey, there is very little fat or grease left on the bird itself. I think it has something to do with the high temp which seals the flesh and keeps it from absorbing the oil. As far as plucking goes, with a wild bird the wing and even the tail feathers are pretty tough to deal with. I cut the wings at the first joint (with pruning shears) leaving only the "drumstick" and the rest I hand pluck. Its time consuming but effective. I have used paraffin before with great success but is kind of unhandy for a single bird. There are also some very fine "hair like" looking bits that I singe off over an open flame. Since I use my deep fryer outside for several of the steps, the flame is available and also the smell is not a problem (singed hair...P U ).

meljanbil's picture

(post #28827, reply #7 of 7)

Wow this sounds great.  Now I don't know if I want to do a turkey or a goose.  Decisions, decisions...