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Culantro?

annieqst's picture

Culantro? (post #30894)

Has anyone heard of culantro? A friend has a recipe calling for it. Supposedly it's used not so much for eating, but like a bay leaf for flavoring. Any idea what to substitute and in what portions?

ChefRobert's picture

(post #30894, reply #1 of 11)

Take a look:
http://www.worldcrops.org/crops/Culantro.cfm


Bob


What do you mean there is no chocolate in this recipe!

What do you mean there is no chocolate in this recipe!

Jean's picture

(post #30894, reply #2 of 11)

Here's another - http://www.tropilab.com/eryngium.html


With a name like Eryngium foetidum you know it's not going to smell like a rose! LOL


Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


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elizaram's picture

(post #30894, reply #3 of 11)

If you have an Asian market in your area, you might check to see if they carry it. I can find it locally in this small Midwestern city, though I have never met a recipe that called for it.



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honeybee55's picture

(post #30894, reply #4 of 11)

Cilantro - pronounced [sih-LAHN-troh]
This member of the carrot family is also referred to as Chinese Parsley and Coriander.  It is actually the leaves (and stems) of the Coriander plant. Cilantro has a very pungent odor and is widely used in Mexican, Caribbean and Asian cooking.   The Cilantro leaves look a bit like flat Italian parsley and in fact are related. 


 

Jean's picture

(post #30894, reply #5 of 11)

Different critter, honey.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
honeybee55's picture

(post #30894, reply #9 of 11)

Sorry I had no idea there was a culantro. I thought the spelling was wrong and she meant cilantro! I just looked it up on the net, and saw that there is a herb called culantro. Never to old to learn!!

Jean's picture

(post #30894, reply #10 of 11)

You don't have to apologize. I had never heard of the stuff before either. I didn't mean to sound curt.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
samchang's picture

(post #30894, reply #6 of 11)

Culantro tastes so much like cilantro that in Thailand it is known as 'pakchee farang,' or foreigner's cilantro.' I prefer cilantro myself, but that's not due to taste, but to texture. Culantro is easy to grow, but once it bolts, it grows nasty spikes that can hurt like crazy.

annieqst's picture

(post #30894, reply #8 of 11)

Thanks all! Yeah, I don't think I'll bother hunting for it and just sub cilantro. A friend is doing a Puerto Rican themed dinner and both the salad recipe and bean recipe she gave me to do call for cilantro and culantro. I'll just use the former!

DeannaS's picture

(post #30894, reply #7 of 11)

It smells (and I believe tastes) a lot like cilantro, but it's more of a tough, solid leaf. I would think that you could probably sub some chopped cilantro thrown in at the end instead of looking for culantro. It wouldn't be quite the same, but I think it would probably work, depending on the recipe.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

spgirl's picture

(post #30894, reply #11 of 11)

yes, I heard of culantro es the same thing of cilantro or coriander, although culantro, the leaves are longer instead of the typical one.