NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Corn on the cob

pamilyn's picture

O.K. I know everyone has opinions on this subject. Last year I started to steam my corn on the cob because of some discussion here. It was wonderful. For some reason I can't get it right this year. I tried 7 minutes and it was too long. I tried 5 minutes and it was just not as good as I remember. Maybe the corn is just a little too young right now. Who knows...any thoughts????  Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Gretchen's picture

(post #31160, reply #1 of 47)

How can corn be too young?   Not in our house!  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
Lexi's picture

(post #31160, reply #2 of 47)

What do you mean by "just not as good as I remember?" 

 

 

pamilyn's picture

(post #31160, reply #3 of 47)

You know....just not as good as I remember. We bought it from a different farmer. Maybe it's just a different variety. Is the corn ready in Chicago? Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Lexi's picture

(post #31160, reply #4 of 47)

It probably was the corn.  I bought the first locally grown sweet corn a couple of weeks ago.  Everything is coming in early because of the miserable, hot weather -- we had Michigan peaches 3 weeks ago --  but the lack of rain has had a negative effect.


Glad to hear the wedding reception went well and the cake was a success.  We knew you could do it!


 

 

Jean's picture

(post #31160, reply #5 of 47)

We had our first really good sweet corn this week. I cook mine in the nuker with a T or 2 of water, in a baking dish covered with  Saran for about 2 minutes per ear. Mmmmmm.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Risottogirl's picture

(post #31160, reply #6 of 47)

I cooked corn in the "nuker" for the very first time, recently. It was perfect.


I never COOK anything in the microwave. I melt stuff and warm stuff and I use the convection function.


We had fresh picked, first local corn of the season and it was just too d@mned hot to bring water to a boil on the stove. Everything else was being grilled outside.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

elizaram's picture

(post #31160, reply #8 of 47)

I never COOK anything in the microwave. I melt stuff and warm stuff...


Ditto here, but Chef Robert mentioned to me this week that he does corn in the microwave. I was skeptical, but decided to try it one night as I was rushed and didn't have time to boil water. His method couldn't be easier - stick the whole ear in there, with the husk on, nuke for 2 and a half minutes, take it out and peel the husk off while the next ear is cooking. I have to say the results were great (and it's a lot easier to peel the corn than when it's raw!)


Pamilyn, I bought some corn from Alsum's Sweet Corn at the Wednesday market, and it was quite good despite the freaky weather we've been having. We also got some from Harmony Valley in our CSA box last weekend, and it was small and not as juicy as it should have been, though still very edible. Maybe try a different vendor next time?



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

Marcia's picture

(post #31160, reply #10 of 47)

Your father's method is exactly the one I use and I discovered it out of laziness. Works great, no matter the reason. Once in a while I do nuke a worm, and while that doesn't bother me, I have to hide it if our daughter's here.

dixie1's picture

(post #31160, reply #17 of 47)

This is the only way I do corn on the cob now. Always perfect.

NanaC's picture

(post #31160, reply #19 of 47)

Elizaram, are you doing only one ear at a time?  Chef Robert does several ears at a time at 2 1/2 min each.  We learned that from my DSIL, Deb, who leaves it in the plastic bag she bought it in, and nukes as much as she can fit in the microwave!  The silk is so much easier to get off.


BTW, our MW is, I think, 1100-1200 watts.  The time needed per ear will vary with the strength of your MW!

Fran

"Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we're here we might as well dance!"

Lexi's picture

(post #31160, reply #22 of 47)

I have flunked microwaving more times than I care to talk about, but hope springs eternal, and I'd like to try microwaving corn.  When you say 2 1/2 minutes per ear, do you mean if I put 4 ears in at a time, I should nuke them on full power for 10 minutes?  

 

 

NanaC's picture

(post #31160, reply #23 of 47)

Lee, that's what Chef Robert has been doing... in fact, that's what he did last night, but the corn was just a bit overdone.  Perhaps 2 min. would have been better.  Of course, if you have a weaker MW, it may be a tiny bit longer, if you are using a commercial MW, shorter.  We just checked our MW,  It is 1620W, more powerful than we thought.

Fran

"Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we're here we might as well dance!"

Lexi's picture

(post #31160, reply #24 of 47)

I'll check on the power of my micro.  I think it's 1600 watts, about the same as yours.  I'm going to try this tonight.  Wish me luck -- my daugters think it's hilarious that I'm microwave impaired, but it's true; I have a black thumb when it comes to nuking.

 

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #31160, reply #25 of 47)

Do your daughters use the nuker for real cooking?  We had a poster a while back who lived in Israel I think who really really did cook in her microwave and extolled its virtues.
I do cook veggies in mine--fresh and frozen.  But now that I have "discovered" roasting broccoli and cauliflower, I rarely do them in the MW.  But I don't do corn in it.  May try, but I can do six ears in water faster than what is being described here.
I do know I can't live without a MW.  I remember a time we were remodeling the kitchen and leaving the next morning for the beach. The MW had been given away in anticipation of a new one.  In the space of hours I probably tried to use it 6 times!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
Jean's picture

(post #31160, reply #27 of 47)

I can do six ears in water faster than what is being described here.


The way I do it 6 ears are done in 12 minutes or less. It takes that long to get the pot of water boiling, unless you have boiling water in your tap.


Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Gretchen's picture

(post #31160, reply #28 of 47)

I start mine from cold water. The corn is done when it boils.  Like Bill posted a bit back.  And it is the same for even more ears.  Just me.

Gretchen


Edited 7/31/2005 2:50 pm ET by GRETCHEN

Gretchen
Lexi's picture

(post #31160, reply #29 of 47)

They don't use it for anything other than veggies or for reheating.  I simply have never acquired a feel for using it.  I love it for quickly defrosting small quantities of soup or stock, for "baked" potatoes, pop corn, and reheating, but am invariably disappointed when I try using it for veggies.  I'm much more comfortable par cooking, sauteeing or roasting veggies, and enjoy doing it.  I normally boil corn the way you do, starting in cold water.  I'm curious to see if there is any difference when using the MW. 

 

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #31160, reply #32 of 47)

They don't use it for anything other than veggies or for reheating


I don't know ANYone that uses it for anything but that. I was just interested in why they found you so amusing.


I find it perfect for cooking veggies just "right".


Gretchen
Gretchen
Heather's picture

(post #31160, reply #26 of 47)

Do you need cast iron fingers to pull the husks off the just-nuked cobs?

NanaC's picture

(post #31160, reply #30 of 47)

Do you need cast iron fingers to pull the husks off the just-nuked cobs?


Sort of, Heather, but the husk and silk comes off so easily, I just use a couple of kitchen towels, one to hold the ear, the other to pull off the husk and silk.

Fran

"Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we're here we might as well dance!"

Heather's picture

(post #31160, reply #31 of 47)

I'm going to try this tonight--thanks

Heather's picture

(post #31160, reply #34 of 47)

I did unhusked corn in the microwave last night for the first time and it was great--as you said, much easier to get the silk off after cooking and the corn was delicious. And no pot to wash, no water wasted, no steaming up of the kitchen! I'm a convert.

pamilyn's picture

(post #31160, reply #35 of 47)

We tried this the other night. I thought the corn was good but a pita to get the hot silk off. I think I will silk it first next time.


Lee, how did it go for you?? Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Heather's picture

(post #31160, reply #36 of 47)

a pita to get the hot silk off

I found just the opposite--after cooking it just fell off. I find it a Royal PITA to take off before cooking.

pamilyn's picture

(post #31160, reply #37 of 47)

It's just so hot. I wonder if you could nuke it naked...Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

TracyK's picture

(post #31160, reply #38 of 47)

I use a clean kitchen towel to hold it, and a paper towel to pluck off the silks. :-)

Squirrels are just rats in cuter outfits.
       -- Carrie Bradshaw

Heather's picture

(post #31160, reply #40 of 47)

I wonder if you could nuke it naked

Whatever turns you on. . .I find that an apron is still a good idea for those hot spatters.

tcurda's picture

(post #31160, reply #41 of 47)

Yesterday I tried nuking a damp shucked ear rolled in a paper towel, and it was absolutely delish! I did one today in the husk, and it was way too hot to get the husk/silk off. I'll probably continue to nuke the nekkid ears.

For those of you near Chicago, there's a new strain of sweet corn developed at a farm outside of Harvard. It's been sold primarily in Japan (dunno the reasoning behind that) but is becomeing more and more available in the US, both as ears and as seed for gardeners and producers. It is absolutely the sweetest corn I've ever had, it's almost like biting into a sugar cube.

Their suggestion for cooking is to boil water, and then drop the ears in for 3 minutes. When your first try this corn, don't put anything on it, just eat that first ear nekkid to get the full effect. One thing I've tried is to dip an ear in a can of melted butter, then roll it in parmesan cheese with cayenne pepper. Yummm!!!

The farm is called Tree Garden Farms (they don't have a website yet) and it's on Rt. 173 a mile west of Harvard in northeastern Illinois.

I have absolutely no connection to this operation, I just love good corn, and this stuff is the best I have ever had. Highly reccommended!!!

Tom

Smile - People will wonder what you're up to.

Tom aka tomcatt

Live today like there's no tomorrow.

Smile - People will wonder what you're up to.
NanaC's picture

(post #31160, reply #42 of 47)

Tomcatt, do you know the name of the variety, so we can be on the lookout for it in our area?

Fran

"Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we're here we might as well dance!"

ghcook's picture

(post #31160, reply #45 of 47)

Not Tomcatt but here's a link to a recent article in the Chicago Tribune about it:


http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0508030274aug03,1,5132447.story