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Coriander(Corriander)

Rich02's picture

OK- you've helped me out with the WW pastry flour and the USDA dried cherries and now we have a giant box of coriander.  I did some research and found both spellings but haven't used it in anything I cooked.  Please keep in mind the clients that I serve and the limited resources and talent involved.  It is mentioned in a lot of middle eastern recipes and also used in sweet desserts.  Am looking for something quick and simple.  Thanks, Rich

It's not what you say or what you do- it's how you make people feel

We did what we did when we knew what we knew, now that we know better, we should do the better thing.   Maya Angelou

roz's picture

(post #35991, reply #1 of 20)

Rich, is it fresh (cilantro) or dried coriander? Fresh is easy...dried could be used in baking and West Asian recipes.

Oh, I just reread your post. Must be dried....a whole box?

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Rich02's picture

(post #35991, reply #2 of 20)

It's in little green bottles from McCormick Gourmet Selection.  They are wrapped in three pack plastic and there must be 75 bottles.  By the way- if NH is in your travel plans this summer, I would be honored to have you visit the Pantry.  Rich

It's not what you say or what you do- it's how you make people feel

We did what we did when we knew what we knew, now that we know better, we should do the better thing.   Maya Angelou

roz's picture

(post #35991, reply #3 of 20)

That's a lot of coriander! I hope everyone likes the taste of it! But you could crush the coriander, some red chilis, salt, garlic and sesame seeds, and sprinkle on flat breads with olive oil.

Use it ground up in quick breads or scones.

Or in Indian cuisine, such as potatoes and/or cauliflower...or red lentil soup or dal.

P.S. Not this summer, but next spring. And I would love to meet you and the pantry!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
ashleyd's picture

(post #35991, reply #8 of 20)

This is one of those rare cases where I think American English is superior to British English (instead of just being different), in the US the green leafy bit is called cilantro and the seeds are coriander, over here we use coriander for both, which can be less than helpful at times!


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

gmunger's picture

(post #35991, reply #4 of 20)

It a common component in spice rubs for meat. Do you have other spices you could combine it with?

 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
gmunger's picture

(post #35991, reply #5 of 20)

The good news is that whole coriander seed has a long shelf life (:

 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
Gretchen's picture

(post #35991, reply #6 of 20)

I think we still don't know if it is whole seed or ground.


It's used in Indian recipes, if it is the spice. If it is dried cilantro (probably not) it is not very flavorful or useful.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Rich02's picture

(post #35991, reply #10 of 20)

Hi Gretchen:  It is whole seeds and while everyone else is at it there is also Black Sesame seeds whole.  Thanks, Rich.

It's not what you say or what you do- it's how you make people feel

We did what we did when we knew what we knew, now that we know better, we should do the better thing.   Maya Angelou

roz's picture

(post #35991, reply #11 of 20)

Black sesame seeds...coriander....something middle eastern or Indian. But it sounds like a lifetime supply!

My husband said to put all the bottles on ebay then buy what you like.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Gretchen's picture

(post #35991, reply #12 of 20)

Black sesame seeds=coating for tuna or salmon for grilling?


Coriander seed--maybe the community garden. Plant 'em.   ;o)


Gretchen
Gretchen
soupereasy's picture

(post #35991, reply #14 of 20)

Doubt people frequenting a food bank are buying tuna to grill. If indeed they even had a grill.;)

smslaw's picture

(post #35991, reply #15 of 20)

Whole seeds?  Plant some! The cilantro grown from seeds you buy specifically to plant may be a little slower to bolt, but the stuff you have may germinate.  With 75 bottles, you have nothing to lose.


Once you plant cilantro, if you leave a plant alone, it reseeds and you'll have plants coming up all over the place.  Unlike mint, though, it is easy to control by just ripping out the plants you don't want.

soupereasy's picture

(post #35991, reply #16 of 20)

Where were you when I tried to grow cilantro? Mind you, I had a lovely haven for bunnies in my mint patch! ;)

smslaw's picture

(post #35991, reply #17 of 20)

In my experience, Cilantro takes a long time to germinate. I won't see any volunteer plants for another month, even though the seeds were dropped in august or september.

samchang's picture

(post #35991, reply #19 of 20)

Do they taste minty?

soupereasy's picture

(post #35991, reply #20 of 20)

LOL! I just watched them never tried one, but as much as they ate I bet they did!;)

ashleyd's picture

(post #35991, reply #9 of 20)

The even better news that even if it is ground then it has a shelf life of more than a year if it is kept in the sealed container, so just open as many packs as you need at a time.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

sbsterling's picture

(post #35991, reply #7 of 20)

There was a simple recipe for coriander chicken in FC not too long ago. Maybe someone else remembers it too. If you're interested I'll try to figure out which issue it was from a little later.

http://neurosesgalore.com
Maedl's picture

(post #35991, reply #13 of 20)

Look for recipes from North Africa as well as the Middle East--I think you'll find some interesting Moroccan recipes that use it. Have a look at this site: http://www.mccormick.com/content.cfm?id=8217

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Dashx's picture

(post #35991, reply #18 of 20)

http://www.taunton.com/finecooking/recipes/coriander-rubbed-pork-chops-orange-hoisin-sauce.aspx?LangType=1033&ac=fp Try this FC pork chop recipe.

I've made it several times (read my review), and everyone loves it. I'm not a pork chop fan; this tastes great with quality chops, and elevates bland grocery store chops. I've also used chicken breasts and thighs, the cooking time needs to be adjusted accordingly. As a side note, the topping, a kind of slaw, I double, and sometimes add other crisp veggies.

Another idea, is to mix the coriander seeds with pepper corns to make a very tasty pepper blend.