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cooking turkey parts

MEANCHEF's picture

For Thanksgiving we are cooking 2 whole breasts, 6 drumsticks and 4 thighs.  Doeas anyone have a clue how to have them all done at approximately the same time?

Agave's picture

(post #36672, reply #1 of 16)

Do you get C.I.?Their turkey recipe for this year is slow roasted parts.Could post it for you if needed.

Gretchen's picture

(post #36672, reply #2 of 16)

So is Mark Bittman's in the NYTimes.

Gretchen

Gretchen
MEANCHEF's picture

(post #36672, reply #3 of 16)

Agave's picture

(post #36672, reply #4 of 16)

Serves 10 to 12. Published November 1, 2008. From Cook's Illustrated.

Instead of drumsticks and thighs, you may use 2 whole leg quarters, 1 1/2 to 2 pounds each. The recipe will also work with turkey breast alone; in step 2, reduce the butter to 1 1/2 tablespoons, the salt to 1 1/2 teaspoons, and the pepper to 1 teaspoon. If you are roasting kosher or self-basting turkey parts, season the turkey with only 1 1/2 teaspoons salt.

Ingredients

Turkey

3 medium onions , chopped medium
3 medium celery ribs , chopped medium
2 medium carrots , peeled and chopped medium
5 sprigs fresh thyme
5 medium garlic cloves , peeled and halved
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
1 whole bone-in, skin-on turkey breast (5 to 7 pounds), trimmed of excess fat and patted dry with paper towels (see note)
4 pounds turkey drumsticks and thighs, trimmed of excess fat and patted dry with paper towels (see note)
3 tablespoons unsalted butter , melted
1 tablespoon table salt
2 teaspoons ground black pepper

Gravy

2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
3 tablespoons unbleached all-purpose flour
2 bay leaves
Table salt and ground black pepper

Instructions

1. For the Turkey: Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 275 degrees. Arrange onions, celery, carrots, thyme, and garlic in even layer on rimmed baking sheet. Pour broth into baking sheet. Place wire rack on top of vegetables (rack will rest on vegetables, not on bottom of baking sheet).

2. Brush turkey pieces on all sides with melted butter. Sprinkle salt and pepper evenly over turkey. Place breast skin-side down and drumsticks and thighs skin-side up on rack on vegetable-filled baking sheet, leaving at least 1/4 inch between pieces.

3. Roast turkey pieces 1 hour. Using wads of paper towels, turn turkey breast skin-side up. Continue roasting until instant-read thermometer registers 160 degrees when inserted in thickest part of breast and 170 to 175 degrees in thickest part of thighs, 1 to 2 hours longer. Remove baking sheet from oven and transfer rack with turkey to second baking sheet. Allow pieces to rest at least 30 minutes or up to 1 1/2 hours.

4. For the Gravy: Strain vegetables and liquid from baking sheet through colander set in large bowl. Press solids with back of spatula to extract as much liquid as possible. Discard vegetables. Transfer liquid in bowl to 4-cup liquid measuring cup. Add chicken broth to measuring cup (you should have about 3 cups liquid).

5. In medium saucepan, heat butter over medium-high heat; when foaming subsides, add flour and cook, stirring constantly, until flour is dark golden brown and fragrant, about 5 minutes. Whisk in broth mixture and bay leaves and gradually bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until gravy is thick and reduced to 2 cups, 15 to 20 minutes. Discard bay leaves. Remove gravy from heat and adjust seasonings with salt and pepper. Keep gravy warm.

6. To Serve: Heat oven to 500 degrees. Place baking sheet with turkey in oven. Roast until skin is golden brown and crisp, about 15 minutes. Remove baking sheet from oven, transfer turkey to cutting board, and let rest 20 minutes. Carve and serve, passing warm gravy separately.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #36672, reply #5 of 16)

Gretchen's picture

(post #36672, reply #6 of 16)

YOU are bad--to the bone.  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
MEANCHEF's picture

(post #36672, reply #7 of 16)

This year we had a whole bunch of people  and various requests for turkey breast, leg, thigh etc  which were incompatable with a whole turkey.  Since 2 turkeys were impossible in one oven, we bought 2 whole turkeys and cut into parts plus added some extra parts.


I dry brined the pieces exactly per the LA times article for 3+ days and then cooked the pieces using the CI method of slow cooking and then blasting at 500 degrees.  The turkey was spectacular.  They key is that every piece of turkey is initially taken out of the oven as it reaches its proper internal temperature.  The resting times can vary from 30 minutes to 1 1/2 hours.  Once all of it is cooked to the proper temperature, the pieces all go back into a 500 degree oven for 15 minutes.  The skin ends up well browned and sizzling.  I would highy recommend the technique.


Jean's picture

(post #36672, reply #8 of 16)

Good to know. Thanks for reporting back.



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tones's picture

(post #36672, reply #9 of 16)

Thank you for your thoughts.  This is something I will do in the future, if not just for a regular dinner.  Glad it turned out for you.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #36672, reply #10 of 16)

This does not qualify for "cooking turkey parts"

but it is quite an interesting recipe and it made me salivate a little - considering the amount of turkey I've had in the past 48 hours, it is surprising I could still salivate for it

http://tinyurl.com/6yclvw

TracyK's picture

(post #36672, reply #11 of 16)

Thanks for the report! I meant to post on this thread a week or so ago... I cooked a turkey thigh for myself using this method, and it was absolutely delicious.


"The world expects us to elect pompous yahoos and instead we have us a 47-year-old prince from the prairie who cheerfully ran the race, and when his opponents threw sand at him, he just smiled back. He'll be the first president in history to look really good making a jump shot. He loves his classy wife and adorable daughters."                          -- Garrison Keilor

Lee's picture

(post #36672, reply #12 of 16)

Mean, did you cover the turkey parts for the entire dry brining period?

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #36672, reply #13 of 16)

Last day was uncovered

Astrid's picture

(post #36672, reply #14 of 16)

I had quite a nice little Thanksgiving for myself and I, 3 drumsticks baked at 350 degrees, salted and buttered and covered for 30 min. then turned and baked another 30 min. covered. I added fresh tarragon, rosemary, marjoram and thyme. The last 15 min. the drums were uncovered to brown. I added glazed carrots and greens and some whole wheat noodles I had on hand. It was all very tasty. :-)

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
MadMom's picture

(post #36672, reply #15 of 16)

Your post makes me wonder.  What exactly would we cook if we were only cooking for ourselves, or would we even bother?  I would probably have a small bowl of dressing, a large bowl of mashed potatoes, some of g-ma's stuffed carrots, peas, rolls, but would I bother with the turkey?  I probably wouldn't, if I could figure out a way to get the gravy without messing with it.  Maybe I could just roast some ground turkey until it gave up all the grease and use the fond from that?  I know I just have to have dressing and gravy and potatoes for leftovers!  I didn't time it right this time, and I have two servings of dressing left, and no potatoes or gravy.  What on earth can I do?  I'll have to think on that, or maybe my good friends here will have suggestions.  Butter and broth for gravy?  It's a hard thing to figure out.



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TracyK's picture

(post #36672, reply #16 of 16)

Nine times out of ten I'm cooking for myself. :-) Of course, it's not holidays.


"The world expects us to elect pompous yahoos and instead we have us a 47-year-old prince from the prairie who cheerfully ran the race, and when his opponents threw sand at him, he just smiled back. He'll be the first president in history to look really good making a jump shot. He loves his classy wife and adorable daughters."                          -- Garrison Keilor